Risk Assessment and Dietary Exposure of Hazardous Substances in Foods

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Toxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2024 | Viewed by 2442

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Insititute of Apicultural Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100093, China
Interests: contaminants; food safety; exposure risks; risk assessment

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Guest Editor
Institute of Quality Standards and Testing Technology for Agro-Products, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
Interests: persistent organic pollutants; animal feed; bioaccumulation; agro-products; food supply chain; exposure and risk assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food is the foundation of survival for many animals. Therefore, food safety issues are not only related to the quality of foods but also influence the health of consumers in the ecosystem, including humans at the top of the food chain. In recent years, hazardous substances generated by climate change, environmental pollution, pathogenic microorganisms, industrial production, packaging and transportation, and cooking processes, among others, have been discovered extensively in food consumed daily. However, whether these hazardous substances pose risks to us, and, indeed, how they might affect us through diet, is a critical question that must answer. This multidisciplinary Special Issue aims to publish papers related to the identification, risk assessment, and dietary exposure of any known and unknown hazardous substances in foods. The contribution of high-quality research articles, original review papers, commentaries, and communications is encouraged, as the aim of this special issue is to provide readers with a concise overview of recent advances in food safety and inspire researchers to clarify the risk levels, mechanisms, and methods that could be applied in order to control these hazards in foods.

Dr. Suzhen Qi
Dr. Shujun Dong
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • food safety
  • food hazardous
  • food contaminant
  • risk assessment
  • dietary exposure

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 1628 KiB  
Article
The Bioaccessibility and Bioavailability of Pentachlorophenol in Five Animal-Derived Foods Measured by Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion
by Quan Zhou, Huiming Chen, Liangliang Li, Yongning Wu, Xingfen Yang, Aimin Jiang and Weiliang Wu
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1254; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081254 - 19 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a ubiquitous emerging persistent organic pollutant detected in the environment and foodstuffs. Despite the dietary intake of PCP being performed using surveillance data, the assessment does not consider the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of PCP. Pork, beef, pork liver, chicken and [...] Read more.
Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a ubiquitous emerging persistent organic pollutant detected in the environment and foodstuffs. Despite the dietary intake of PCP being performed using surveillance data, the assessment does not consider the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of PCP. Pork, beef, pork liver, chicken and freshwater fish Ctenopharyngodon Idella-fortified by three levels of PCP were processed by RIVM and the Caco-2 cell model after steaming, boiling and pan-frying, and PCP in foods and digestive juices were detected using isotope dilution–UPLC-MS/MS. The culinary treatment and food matrix were significantly influenced (p < 0.05) in terms of the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of PCP. Pan-frying was a significant factor (p < 0.05) influencing the digestion and absorption of PCP in foods, with the following bioaccessibility: pork (81.37–90.36%), beef (72.09–83.63%), pork liver (69.11–78.07%), chicken (63.43–75.52%) and freshwater fish (60.27–72.14%). The bioavailability was as follows: pork (49.39–63.41%), beef (40.32–53.43%), pork liver (33.63–47.11%), chicken (30.63–40.83%) and freshwater fish (17.14–27.09%). Pork and beef with higher fat content were a key factor in facilitating the notable PCP bioaccessibility and bioavailability (p < 0.05). Further, the exposure of PCP to the population was significantly reduced by 42.70–98.46% after the consideration of bioaccessibility and bioavailability, with no potential health risk. It can improve the accuracy of risk assessment for PCP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment and Dietary Exposure of Hazardous Substances in Foods)
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16 pages, 2357 KiB  
Article
Dissipation, Residue and Human Dietary Risk Assessment of Pyraclostrobin and Cyazofamid in Grapes Using an HPLC-UV Detector
by Peiying Zhao, Rong Liu and Longfei Yuan
Foods 2024, 13(2), 314; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020314 - 18 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Pyraclostrobin is a new broad-spectrum methoxyacrylic acid fungicide. Cyazofamid is a new selective foliar spray acaricide. Here, we studied the degradation rate and final residues of pyraclostrobin and cyazofamid in grape and evaluated their dietary risk to consumers. The average recoveries of pyraclostrobin [...] Read more.
Pyraclostrobin is a new broad-spectrum methoxyacrylic acid fungicide. Cyazofamid is a new selective foliar spray acaricide. Here, we studied the degradation rate and final residues of pyraclostrobin and cyazofamid in grape and evaluated their dietary risk to consumers. The average recoveries of pyraclostrobin ether ester, cyazofamid and cyazofamid metabolite (CCIM) in grapes were 84–94%, 92–98% and 99–104%, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 6.0–20.3%, 2.4–10.5% and 1.3–4.0%, respectively, and the LOQs were all 0.05 mg/kg. The digestion dynamics of the experimental sites were in accordance with the first-order kinetic equation. The degradation half-lives of pyraclostrobin ether ester and cyazofamid were 17.8 d–28.9 d and 4.3 d–7.8 d, respectively. The final residues of pyraclostrobin ether ester, cyazofamid and CCIM in grapes were <0.05–1.88 mg/kg, <0.05–0.31 mg/kg and <0.05–0.47 mg/kg, respectively. Using probability models, the total chronic risk values for pyraclostrobin and cyazofamid were calculated to be 0.112–189.617% and 0.021–1.714%, respectively. The results of the contribution analysis indicate that pyraclostrobin poses a much greater risk to Chinese consumers than cyazofamid, especially to children and adolescents, who have a significantly greater risk than adults. This suggests that more consideration should be given to the cumulative risk of compounds for vulnerable groups in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment and Dietary Exposure of Hazardous Substances in Foods)
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19 pages, 1370 KiB  
Article
Health Risk Assessment of Antibiotic Pollutants in Large Yellow Croakers from Zhejiang Aquaculture Sites
by Zongjie Li, Yinyin Jin, Xingyu Wang, Liudong Xu, Liyan Teng, Kang Fu, Baoling Li, Yulu Li, Ying Huang, Ning Ma, Feng Cui and Tingting Chai
Foods 2024, 13(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010031 (registering DOI) - 21 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Intensive aquaculture combatting the decline of large yellow croaker populations can trigger bacterial outbreaks, resulting in extensive antibiotic use. In this study, we screened 5 aquaculture sites in the coastal areas of Zhejiang and identified 17 antibiotics in large yellow croakers using UPLC-MS/MS. [...] Read more.
Intensive aquaculture combatting the decline of large yellow croaker populations can trigger bacterial outbreaks, resulting in extensive antibiotic use. In this study, we screened 5 aquaculture sites in the coastal areas of Zhejiang and identified 17 antibiotics in large yellow croakers using UPLC-MS/MS. The distribution and occurrence of antibiotic pollutants were different in the different tissues of large yellow croakers, being primarily dominated by quinolones. Relatively higher average residue levels of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were detected in the inedible parts, specifically the gills (37.29 μg/kg). Meanwhile, relatively high average residue levels of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were also found in the edible parts, particularly in the muscle (23.18 μg/kg). We observed that the residue levels detected in the swim bladder exceeded the prescribed limit for fish muscle, but there is currently no specific regulatory limit established for this particular tissue. Despite the HI values of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin being below 0.01, the health risks should not be disregarded. The findings of this research provide significant practical implications for assessing antibiotic contamination and enhancing the risk management of coastal regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment and Dietary Exposure of Hazardous Substances in Foods)
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