Current Research Utilizing Mass Spectrometry and Chromatography in Food Analysis

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2024) | Viewed by 4322

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry Biological Pharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: food chemistry; bioactive molecules; liquid chromatography; mass spectrometry; extraction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry Biological Pharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: flavonoids; liquid chromatography; natural product chemistry chromatography; high-performance liquid chromatography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food analysis, both for quality and product control purposes as well as for scientific research, is one of the aspects that affect each of us, even indirectly. Analytical tools such as mass spectrometry and chromatography are the most applied techniques for food analysis, allowing us to obtain information on the composition of nutrients and identify contamination to guarantee consumer health and ensure compliance with food production laws.

The evolution and development of modern and advanced hyphenated and non-hyphenated analytical techniques, such as liquid and gas chromatography or direct infusion mass spectrometry, have led to obtaining even more detailed and precise information for an in-depth knowledge of foods. Using these techniques, it could be possible to obtain a large amount of information that needs to be evaluated. In this regard, the application of chemometric techniques can also be a further aid in the study of complex samples such as food.

This Special Issue is collecting contributions related to the development of mass spectrometry and chromatographic analytical techniques for targeted and untargeted analytes in foods. Both original works and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Marina Russo
Dr. Katia Arena
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food analysis
  • chromatography
  • mass spectrometry
  • chemometric
  • hyphenated techniques
  • direct infusion mass spectrometry
  • food composition
  • food contaminants

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 3630 KiB  
Article
An Analysis of Polysaccharides from Eight Plants by a Novel Heart-Cutting Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography Method
by Haonan Wang, Hongyu Jin, Ruiping Chai, Hailiang Li, Jing Fan, Ying Wang, Feng Wei and Shuangcheng Ma
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1173; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081173 - 12 Apr 2024
Viewed by 596
Abstract
Natural polysaccharides are important active biomolecules. However, the analysis and structural characterization of polysaccharides are challenging tasks that often require multiple techniques and maps to reflect their structural features. This study aimed to propose a new heart-cutting two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D–LC) method for [...] Read more.
Natural polysaccharides are important active biomolecules. However, the analysis and structural characterization of polysaccharides are challenging tasks that often require multiple techniques and maps to reflect their structural features. This study aimed to propose a new heart-cutting two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D–LC) method for separating and analyzing polysaccharides to explore the multidimensional information of polysaccharide structure in a single map. That is, the first-dimension liquid chromatography (1D–LC) presents molecular-weight information, and the second-dimension liquid chromatography (2D–LC) shows the fingerprints of polysaccharides. In this 2D–LC system, the size-exclusion chromatography–hydrophilic interaction chromatography (SEC–HILIC) model was established. Coupling with a charged aerosol detector (CAD) eliminated the need for the derivatization of the polysaccharide sample, allowing the whole process to be completed within 80 min. The methods were all validated in terms of precision, linearity, stability, and repeatability. The capability of the new 2D-LC method was demonstrated in determining various species of natural polysaccharides. Our experimental data demonstrated the feasibility of the whole systematic approach, opening the door for further applications in the field of natural polysaccharide analysis. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 968 KiB  
Article
New and Rapid Analytical Method Using HPLC-MS Detection for Acrylamide Determination in Black Ripe Olives
by Mercedes Brenes-Álvarez, Eva María Ramírez, Manuel Brenes, Pedro García-García, Eduardo Medina and Concepción Romero
Foods 2023, 12(21), 4037; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12214037 - 6 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1186
Abstract
The presence of acrylamide, a known human carcinogen, in various heated foods raises significant concerns among consumers. Therefore, the development of a good analytical method is of paramount interest to the scientific community. Keeping this in view, a rapid, simple, reliable, and low-cost [...] Read more.
The presence of acrylamide, a known human carcinogen, in various heated foods raises significant concerns among consumers. Therefore, the development of a good analytical method is of paramount interest to the scientific community. Keeping this in view, a rapid, simple, reliable, and low-cost analytical method was developed and validated for acrylamide quantification in black ripe olives. The method consisted of the water extraction of the compounds from crushed olives with the addition of (13C3)acrylamide as an internal standard. The quantification was performed using high-pressure liquid chromatography and mass detection with positive electrospray ionization. The limits of detection and quantification were determined to be 4 and 11 µg/kg, respectively. The developed method exhibited excellent results in terms of accuracy (98.4–104.8%) and intra- and inter-day precision limits, both less than 20%. This new method was carried out by analyzing 15 samples of Spanish commercial black ripe olives, revealing a wide range of values, from 79 to 1068 µg/kg of fruit. The new protocol reduces the analysis time to just one hour per sample versus the minimum 24 h required by gas chromatography and mass detection, meaning that it could be a good option for the routine analysis of acrylamide in black ripe olives, and may be extendable to the analysis of this compound in other foods. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 1870 KiB  
Communication
Simultaneous Analysis of Hydrophobic Atractylenolides, Atractylon and Hydrophilic Sugars in Bai-Zhu Using a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Column Tandem Technique
by Zhixing Gu, Xi Nie, Ping Guo, Yuehua Lu and Bo Chen
Foods 2023, 12(21), 3931; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12213931 - 27 Oct 2023
Viewed by 960
Abstract
An analytical method was established using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array and evaporative light scattering detectors (HPLC-DAD-ELSD) with -C18 and -NH2 column tandem for the simultaneous determination of hydrophobic atractylenolide I, II, III, atractylone and hydrophilic compounds glucose, fructose [...] Read more.
An analytical method was established using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array and evaporative light scattering detectors (HPLC-DAD-ELSD) with -C18 and -NH2 column tandem for the simultaneous determination of hydrophobic atractylenolide I, II, III, atractylone and hydrophilic compounds glucose, fructose and sucrose in the dried rhizome of Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz (a natural raw material for health foods, Bai-Zhu aka. in Chinese). The method combines the different separation capabilities of reversed-phase liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. It can provides a new choice for the simultaneous determination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds in traditional Chinese medicines and health foods. It provided a reference method for the quality control of Bai-Zhu. The results showed that the linear correlation coefficients of the established column tandem chromatographic method were all greater than 0.9990, the relative standard deviation was 0.1–2.8%, and the average recovery was 96.7–103.1%. The contents of atractylenolide I, II, III, atractylone, fructose, glucose, and sucrose in 17 batches of Baizhu were 172.3–759.8 μg/g, 201.4–612.8 μg/g, 160.3–534.2 μg/g, 541.4–8723.1 μg/g, 6.9–89.7 mg/g, 0.7–7.9 mg/g, and 1.2–21.0 mg/g, respectively. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 651 KiB  
Article
Determination of Oxygen Heterocyclic Compounds in Foods Using Supercritical Fluid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry
by Giovanna Cafeo, Antonella Satira, Marina Russo, Monica Mondello and Paola Dugo
Foods 2023, 12(18), 3408; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12183408 - 13 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1166
Abstract
The aim of this research was to determine oxygen heterocyclic compounds in twenty-six Citrus- and cinnamon-flavoured foods using supercritical fluid chromatography in combination with triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (SFC-QqQ-MS). According to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on the determination of [...] Read more.
The aim of this research was to determine oxygen heterocyclic compounds in twenty-six Citrus- and cinnamon-flavoured foods using supercritical fluid chromatography in combination with triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (SFC-QqQ-MS). According to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on the determination of these molecules in foods by means of the SFC-QqQ-MS technique. The analytical technique normally used for their determination in foods is liquid chromatography coupled with a photodiode array detector. However, supercritical fluid chromatography is proving to be a valid alternative approach to investigating coumarins, furocoumarins and polymethoxyflavones. According to the results presented herein, each sample analysed showed the presence of molecules of interest. Coumarin was found in all the cinnamon-flavoured samples analysed in a low concentration. The presence of oxygen heterocyclic compounds in all the Citrus-flavoured samples, according to the label, comfirmed that the foods selected for this research article were prepared with Citrus fruits. Among the samples analysed, mandarin juice was the richest in bioactive compounds, representing a good source of polymethoxyflavones in a diet. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop