Nanofibers

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2017) | Viewed by 24880

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Fiber Science & Apparel Design and College of Human Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14456, USA
Interests: green composites; green materials; composites; resins; bioresins; biocomposites; nanofibers; green nanofibers; sustainable materials; fiber/resin interface
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanofibers are fibers with diameters smaller than 100 nm. Because of their ultrahigh surface per unit weight, nanofibers can be used in any application where surface characteristics are critical. Organic nanofibers can be spun by melt processing, electrospinning, electrostatic spinning, force spinning, as well as other methods. Nanocellulosic fibers have been derived from plants as well as bacteria. Nanofibers have been used in many applications including filters (HEPA and ultrafiltration for both liquids and gases), medicine (tissue scaffolding, drug delivery, wound dressing, etc.), pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, medical textiles, sport apparel, etc. Nanofibers are also used in energy applications, such as photovoltaic cells, membrane fuel cells, etc. The current trend in nanofibers is to use them for micropower generation. High strength nanofibers may also be used as reinforcing agent in composite materials.

The Special Issue will include many aspects of nanofibers, but will focus on manufacturing, characterization and applications of nanofibers. 

Prof. Dr. Anil N. Netravali
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Nanofiber production
  • Electrospinning
  • Force Spinning
  • Melt processing
  • Cellulose nanofibers
  • Nanobio fibers
  • Carbon nanofibers
  • Nanofiber modifications
  • Nanofiber applications
  • Nanofiber based composites

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

4342 KiB  
Communication
Tolnaftate-Loaded PolyacrylateElectrospun Nanofibers for an Impressive Regimen on Dermatophytosis
by Shashi Kiran Misra, Himanshu Pandey, Sandip Patil, Pramod W. Ramteke and Avinash C. Pandey
Fibers 2017, 5(4), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib5040041 - 6 Nov 2017
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 7041
Abstract
Dermatophytosis, topical fungal infection is the most common cause of skin bug in the world, generally underestimated and ignored. It is commonly caused by immensely mortifying and keratinophilic fungal eukaryotes which invade keratinized tissues and generate different tinea diseases in Mediterranean countries. We [...] Read more.
Dermatophytosis, topical fungal infection is the most common cause of skin bug in the world, generally underestimated and ignored. It is commonly caused by immensely mortifying and keratinophilic fungal eukaryotes which invade keratinized tissues and generate different tinea diseases in Mediterranean countries. We herein fabricated nanofibers/scaffolds embedded with thiocarbamate derivative topical antifungal tolnaftatefor the first time to target the complete elimination of dermatophyte at the site of infection. In this regard, variable combinations of biocompatible Eudragit grades (ERL100 and ERS100) were selected to provide better adhesion on the site of dermatophytosis, ample absorption of exudates during treatment, and customized controlled drug release. Surface topography analysis indicated that the fabricated nanofibers were regular and defect-free, comprising distinct pockets with nanoscaled diameters. Characterization and compatibility studies of tolnaftate, polymers, and their nanofibers were performed through ATR-FTIR, TGA, and PXRD. Remarkable hydrophilicity and an excellent swelling index were obtained from a 3:1 ratio of ERL100/ERS100 electrospun D3 nanofibers, which is an essential benchmark for the fabrication of nanofibrous scaffolds for alleviating dermatophytosis. In vitro drug release investigation revealed that a nonwoven nanomesh of nanofibers could control the rate of drug release for 8 h. A microdilution assay exhibited inhibition of more than 95% viable cells of Trichophyton rubrum for 96 h. However, Microsporum species rigidly restricted the effect of bioactive antifungal nanofibers and hence showed resistance. In vivo activity on Trichophyton rubrum infected Swiss albino mice revealed complete inhibition of fungal pathogens on successive applications of D3 nanofibers for 7 days. This investigation suggests potential uses of tolnaftate loaded polyacrylate nanofibers as dressing materials/scaffolds for effective management of dermatophytosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanofibers)
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1782 KiB  
Article
In Situ Produced Bacterial Cellulose Nanofiber-Based Hybrids for Nanocomposites
by Kaiyan Qiu and Anil Netravali
Fibers 2017, 5(3), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib5030031 - 22 Aug 2017
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 7812
Abstract
Two high-performance bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofiber-based hybrid structures were produced using an in situ self-assembly approach, one with microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and another with sisal fiber, by incorporating them in the fermentation media. The fabricated BC-MFC hybrid and BC-sisal hybrid fibers showed enhanced [...] Read more.
Two high-performance bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofiber-based hybrid structures were produced using an in situ self-assembly approach, one with microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and another with sisal fiber, by incorporating them in the fermentation media. The fabricated BC-MFC hybrid and BC-sisal hybrid fibers showed enhanced mechanical properties compared to pure BC and sisal fibers, respectively. Tensile tests indicated BC-MFC hybrid and their nanocomposites fabricated with soy protein isolate (SPI) resin had better tensile properties than corresponding BC and BC-SPI nanocomposites. This was because of the uniform distribution of MFC within the BC nanofiber network structure which reduced the defects such as pores and voids or intersections of the BC nanofibers. BC-sisal hybrid fibrous structures were obtained after BC nanofibers self-assembled on the surface of the sisal fibers during the fermentation. The results of the microbond tests indicated that the BC-sisal hybrid fiber/SPI resin bond strength was higher than the control sisal fiber/SPI resin bond with p value of 0.02 at the significance level of 0.05. Higher bond strength is preferred since it can potentially lead to better tensile properties of the composites. The presented work suggests a novel route to fabricate hybrid nanocomposites with higher functional properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanofibers)
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5494 KiB  
Article
Effect of Calcination Temperature on NO–CO Decomposition by Pd Catalyst Nanoparticles Supported on Alumina Nanofibers
by Hyeon Ung Shin, Ahmed Abutaleb, Dinesh Lolla and George G. Chase
Fibers 2017, 5(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib5020022 - 8 Jun 2017
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 8848
Abstract
In this work, palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were blended into a solution of a sacrificial polymer and an aluminum sol gel precursor to form alumina fibers containing the palladium particles. The polymer solution was electrospun into template submicron fibers. These fibers were calcined at [...] Read more.
In this work, palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were blended into a solution of a sacrificial polymer and an aluminum sol gel precursor to form alumina fibers containing the palladium particles. The polymer solution was electrospun into template submicron fibers. These fibers were calcined at temperatures between 650 °C and 1150 °C to remove the polymer and oxidize the aluminum. The internal crystalline morphologies of the calcined fibers transformed with change in the calcination temperature. The calcined fibers were formed into fibrous mats and further tested for their catalytic performances. The Pd particles had a size ranging from 5–20 nm and appeared randomly distributed within and near the surfaces of the alumina fibers. The final metal loading of all Pd/Al2O3 samples ranged from 4.7 wt % to 5.1 wt %. As calcination temperature increased the alumina crystal structure changed from amorphous at 650 °C to alpha crystal structure at 1150 °C. With the increase of calcination temperature, the average fiber diameters and specific surface areas decreased. The catalyst supported fiber media had good conversion of NO and CO gases. Higher calcination temperatures led to higher reaction temperatures from 250 to about 450 °C for total conversion, indicating the effective reactivity of the fiber-supported catalysts decreased with increase in calcination temperature. The fibers formed at the 650 °C calcination temperature had the highest reaction activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanofibers)
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