Lactic Acid Fermentation

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Industrial Fermentation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2023) | Viewed by 3456

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy
Interests: metabolic engineering; biorefinery; clostridium; lactic acid fermentation; butanol
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Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy (ATB), Department of Microbiome Biotechnology, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
Interests: industrial biotechnology; bioconversion; bioengineering; bioprocesses; biomass and residues; biorefineries; microbial conversion processes; microbiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lactic acid (LA) is among the most requested compounds by the food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and chemical industry. Current substantial increase of LA global demand (≈12.5% per year) is mainly related to LA use as building block for manufacturing biodegradable and biocompatible polymers (e.g. polylactide, PLA) with application as general substitutes of petroleum-derived plastics.

Nowadays, about 90% of the global LA is produced by microbial fermentation of food crops (e.g. corn and sugarcane), which raises ethical and economical concerns. The current cost of LA (US$ 1.30–4.0/kg) should decrease to less than US$ 0.8/kg for PLA to be economically competitive with oil-derived polymers.

Research on alternative feedstocks for LA fermentation has focused on non-food feedstocks such as by-products of dairy industry (e.g., milk whey), food waste, glycerol, microalgae, wheat bran or lignocellulose. The present special issue aims to capture the state-of-the-art in the most cutting edge strategies for fermentative production of LA, providing solutions from both environmental and economic sustainability. All level studies, from proof-of-concept to large/industrial scale process, from optimization of fermentation conditions down to microbial physiology, including microbial consortia and metabolic engineering of pure microbial strain(s), both research articles and reviews are welcome, provided their high quality.

Dr. Roberto Mazzoli
Dr. Joachim Venus
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • lactic acid
  • fermentation
  • microbial consortia
  • metabolic engineering
  • purification
  • food waste
  • milk whey
  • lignocellulose
  • lactate dehydrogenase

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 977 KiB  
Article
Effects of Different Cutting Stages and Additives on the Fermentation Quality and Microbial Community of Sudangrass (Sorghum sudanense Stapf.) Silages
by Qiang Yu, Mengxin Li, Yu Zhang, Jinyi Xu, Ping Li, Hong Sun, Yixiao Xie, Rui Dong, Yulong Zheng and Chao Chen
Fermentation 2023, 9(8), 777; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9080777 - 21 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 953
Abstract
(1) Background: Previous studies have indicated that ferulic acid esterase (FAE), cellulase and xylanase have synergistic effects in lignocellulose degradation, and the cutting stage has a major impact on silages. Whether these additives affect the silages at different cutting stages is unclear. (2) [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Previous studies have indicated that ferulic acid esterase (FAE), cellulase and xylanase have synergistic effects in lignocellulose degradation, and the cutting stage has a major impact on silages. Whether these additives affect the silages at different cutting stages is unclear. (2) Methods: Sudangrass height at the tested cutting stages was 1.8 m (S1) and 2.0 m (S2). The silage from the two cutting stages was treated with FAE-producing Lactobacillus plantarum (LP), cellulase and xylanase (CX) and a combination of LP and CX (LP+CX) for 30 and 60 days. (3) Results: Compared with CK, adding LP+CX significantly decreased the pH and the content of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acidic detergent fiber (ADF) (p < 0.05) and increased the lactic acid (LA) concentration (p < 0.05), dry matter (DM) content and crude protein content. Adding LP+CX effectively degraded lignocellulose in sudangrass, and the NDF and ADF degradation rates at the two stages were all more than 30%. In comparison, cutting at the S2 stage led to a lower pH and higher LA and DM contents (p < 0.05). Additives and the cutting stage exerted a strong effect on the silage microbial community, and Firmicutes and Lactiplantibacillus became the most dominant bacterial phyla and genera, especially at the S2 stage. (4) Conclusions: The results suggest that FAE-producing L. plantarum, cellulase and xylanase had synergistic effects on sudangrass silages, especially at the S2 stage, and their use can thus serve as an efficient method for ensiling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lactic Acid Fermentation)
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16 pages, 947 KiB  
Article
Third Generation Lactic Acid Production by Lactobacillus pentosus from the Macroalgae Kappaphycus alvarezii Hydrolysates
by Adam Tabacof, Verônica Calado and Nei Pereira, Jr.
Fermentation 2023, 9(4), 319; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9040319 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1700
Abstract
The evaluation of macroalgae as a new raw material for diverse bioprocesses is of great interest due to their fast growth rate and low environmental impact. Lactic acid has a high value in the bio-based industry and is mainly produced via fermentation. The [...] Read more.
The evaluation of macroalgae as a new raw material for diverse bioprocesses is of great interest due to their fast growth rate and low environmental impact. Lactic acid has a high value in the bio-based industry and is mainly produced via fermentation. The anaerobic lactic acid fermentation of Kappaphycus alvarezii hydrolysates using the high-producing strain Lactobacillus pentosus was evaluated for detoxified and non-treated hydrolysates prepared from concentrated algal biomass and dilute acid solution mixtures. A novel hydrolysate detoxification procedure, combining activated charcoal and over-liming, for 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) removal was used. L. pentosus was found to successfully ferment detoxified and untreated hydrolysates produced in up to 30% and 20% w/v solutions, respectively. Significant production rates (1.88 g/L.h) and short lag phases were achieved in bioreactor fermentation operating at 37 °C and pH 6 with 150 rpm impeller velocity. A 0.94 g/g yield from fermentable sugars (galactose and glucose) was achieved, indicating that K. alvarezii could be used as a raw material for lactic acid production, within the context of Third Generation (3G) biorefinery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lactic Acid Fermentation)
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