Ecological Restoration in Marine Environments

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2024 | Viewed by 1035

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Italian Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA), Chioggia, Venice, Italy
Interests: transitional and coastal waters; environmental impact assessment; ecological and chemical status quality; statistical data analysis; ecological restoration; water framework directive; climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Italian Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA), Chioggia, Venice, Italy
Interests: transitional waters; restoration of coastal lagoon; monitoring human impact; water framework directive; environmental lagoon management; nature-based solutions; climate change; ecological status quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few decades, many marine and coastal ecosystems have experienced a decrease in their environmental status. Multiple stressors, such as pollutants, excess of nutrient inputs, fishing and harvesting of aquatic resources, shipping activities and some recreational activities, direct destruction or reduction in habitats, and other ecosystem alterations, as well as issues related to climate change, such as sea-level rise, coastal squeeze and erosion, can impact biological processes, alter ecosystem functions and decrease global and local biodiversity. The protection and restoration of these ecosystems are a high priority. Thus, they may recover from anthropogenic perturbations by following natural restoration. Otherwise, anthropogenic interventions can redirect the recovery through ecological restoration.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to bring together scientific studies carried out on ecological restoration in marine, coastal and transitional waters. Submissions on the following issues related to ecological restoration, among other issues, are welcome:

  • Case studies;
  • New approaches to assess goals’ restorative activities;
  • Remediation of impacted areas;
  • Restoration ecology: address causes and study the process;
  • Nature-based solutions;
  • Ecological service assessment in restoration;
  • Eco-engineering measures.

Dr. Federica Cacciatore
Dr. Rossella Boscolo Brusà
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine, coastal and transitional waters
  • habitat status
  • wildlife/species
  • ecological services
  • nature based solutions
  • environmental restoration

Published Papers (1 paper)

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6 pages, 221 KiB  
Opinion
Challenges in Restoring Mediterranean Seagrass Ecosystems in the Anthropocene
by Monica Montefalcone
Environments 2024, 11(5), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments11050086 - 23 Apr 2024
Viewed by 781
Abstract
The intense human pressures in the Anthropocene epoch are causing an alarming decline in marine coastal ecosystems and an unprecedented loss of biodiversity. This situation underscores the urgency of making ecological restoration a global priority to recover degraded ecosystems. Meadows of the endemic [...] Read more.
The intense human pressures in the Anthropocene epoch are causing an alarming decline in marine coastal ecosystems and an unprecedented loss of biodiversity. This situation underscores the urgency of making ecological restoration a global priority to recover degraded ecosystems. Meadows of the endemic Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica have lost more than half of their original extent in the last century, necessitating immediate conservation and management measures, supported by active restoration interventions. This paper explores new opportunities and provides specific recommendations to enhance restoration as a fundamental strategy for reversing the decline of P. oceanica ecosystems in the Mediterranean Sea. When a return to a historical pristine reference condition may not be feasible in the short term or desirable given current environmental conditions and uncertainty, transplanting the tolerant and fast-growing seagrass species Cymodocea nodosa could facilitate natural recolonization. This would occur through secondary ecological succession, benefiting the sensitive and slow-growing species P. oceanica. Future global and local efforts should primarily focus on proactive management to prevent further alterations by planning appropriate conservation measures in a timely manner to mitigate and reverse global changes. As a secondary step, restoration programs can be implemented with a focus on ‘target-oriented’ rather than ‘reference-oriented’ conditions, aiming to establish ecosystems capable of sustaining the future rather than replicating the historical environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecological Restoration in Marine Environments)
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