New Insights in Soil Quality and Management

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 364

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
LEAF—Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food Research Center, Associate Laboratory TERRA, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: soil quality; soil remediation; biochar; technosols

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
LEAF—Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food Research Center, Associate Laboratory TERRA, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: soil quality; nature-based techniques; environmental geochemistry, soil-plant interactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Chemistry Research Unit (CIQUP), Institute of Molecular Sciences (IMS), Department of Geosciences, Environment and Spatial Plannings, Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto (FCUP), Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
Interests: environmental sciences; soil physical chemistry; climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil is one of the most relevant and influential system components as a regulator of ecosystem services and functions. It is a central component in the regulation of nutrient cycles, the control and buffering of contamination (food security and water quality), as well as the control and regulation of the C cycle, among others. Methods used to determine soil quality and soil management, according to different sources of impacts, such as polymetallic contamination, pesticides, forest fires, desertification, erosion, etc., are constantly evolving and innovating. The biological component of soils and its interrelation with physico-chemical properties, as well as the use of new non-invasive or destructive determination techniques, such as remote sensing, to infer diverse soil properties, are some of the current advances that intervene in decision-making processes and help to improve soil quality indicators and soil management.

This Special Issue aims to present the most relevant advances in the following: different indicators and modes of soil management, such as the establishment of quality indicators (physical, chemical, or biological) in soils, as well as indicators and indices of risk in relation to different ecosystem and human health disturbances; the creation of predictive models of soil quality and management using remote sensing and AI techniques; the development of indicators and sensors for determining soil quality; methods of soil quality assessment; and the various strategies and forms of sustainable soil management. Studies are encouraged to consider applied solutions in the fields of agriculture, forestry, industry, and mining, as well as to explore urban soils in real situations and medium–long-term studies.

Dr. Diego Arán
Dr. Erika S. Santos
Prof. Dr. Joaquim Esteves Da Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • soil quality
  • soil management
  • environmental and human risk
  • ecosystem services
  • environmental geochemistry
  • remote sensing
  • preditive models
  • nature-based techniques

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1022 KiB  
Article
The Potential Impact of Long-Term Copper Fungicide Sprays on Soil Health in Avocado Orchards
by Dumsane Themba Matse, Thangavelautham Geretharan, Eileen F. van Gorp, Sean Anderson, Paramsothy Jeyakumar and Christopher W. N. Anderson
Environments 2024, 11(6), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments11060109 (registering DOI) - 25 May 2024
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Abstract
The long-term use of copper (Cu)-based fungicide sprays in orchards is associated with changes in soil Cu levels. However, there is a gap in knowledge regarding the potential accumulation of Cu in orchards and the associated impacts on the soil microbial structure. This [...] Read more.
The long-term use of copper (Cu)-based fungicide sprays in orchards is associated with changes in soil Cu levels. However, there is a gap in knowledge regarding the potential accumulation of Cu in orchards and the associated impacts on the soil microbial structure. This study assessed the possibility of Cu accumulation in different avocado orchard farms and further evaluated the potential effect on soil microbial activities. Soil Cu levels were quantified in Tauranga and Northland, and three avocado orchards were analysed in each experimental location. All avocado farms in both sites received Cu-based fungicide sprays for over eight years. Soil samples were collected at a 0–20 cm depth from all six orchards. The soil total and bioavailable Cu, changes in soil chemical properties, microbial biomass, dehydrogenase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and acid phosphatase activity were measured. The results revealed that the total Cu and bioavailable Cu concentrations in Tauranga orchards were 81.3 and 0.32, 196.7 and 0.82, and 33.6 and 0.31 mg Cu kg−1 in Farms 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In Northland orchards, the total Cu and bioavailable Cu were 54.5 and 0.06, 18.4 and 0.77, and 46 and 0.34 mg Cu kg−1 in Farm 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Five out of six of the avocado orchard farms assessed in this study had total Cu concentrations greater than 30 mg Cu kg−1 reported in New Zealand native land. The magnitude of Cu accumulation was linked with soil pH and C content. No clear trend was observed between soil Cu concentrations and the soil microbial activity. Our study results demonstrated that the long-term use of Cu-based fungicide sprays can elevate Cu concentrations in orchard soils. Mitigation strategies need to be explored to abate the accumulation of Cu in orchard soils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in Soil Quality and Management)
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