Emerging Technologies for Advanced Water Purification II

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2023) | Viewed by 6737

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Western Macedonia, GR-50132 Kozani, Greece
Interests: advanced oxidation processes; electrochemistry; photocatalysis; persulfate; sonochemistry; wastewater treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environment, Ionian University, 29100 Zakynthos, Greece
Interests: synthesis and characterization of materials for pollutant degradation and energy production
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environment, Ionian University, 29100 Zakynthos, Greece
Interests: water quality; water and wastewater treatment; water analysis; water chemistry; environmental pollution; environmental analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the reuse of wastewater has increased dramatically, due to the constant increase in water demand. This is due both to population growth and urbanization and to climate change. From this perspective, research in the field of advanced water management and treatment has increased significantly. New technologies have emerged to address new challenges, such as the degradation of persistent pollutants and emerging contaminants, non-biodegradable wastewater, and pathogens.

This Special Issue welcomes submissions on advanced wastewater management and treatment including, but not limited to, the following:

- Physico-chemical processes (membrane technologies, coagulation-flocculation, etc.);

- Advanced oxidation processes (photocatalysis, ozone Fenton, activated persulfate, sonochemistry, electrochemical oxidation, etc.);

- Applications of new catalytic materials for advanced wastewater treatment;

- Combination of biological and physicochemical processes—hybrid treatment;

- Advanced biological treatment (moving bed and membrane bioreactors, etc.);

- Bioremediation and phytoremediation;

- Studies carried out in pilot plants or related to size scaling;

- Applications of artificial intelligence to advanced waste treatment;

- Simulation of advanced treatment of wastewater or drinking water.

The publications in the first volume, which we believe may be of interest to you, can be found at the following link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/environments/special_issues/Technologies_Water

Dr. Zacharias Frontistis
Dr. Athanasia Petala
Dr. Adamantia A. Kampioti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-biodegradable wastewater
  • emerging contaminants
  • advanced wastewater treatment
  • physicochemical treatment
  • MBR reactor
  • bioremediation
  • advanced oxidation processes
  • pilot plants
  • simulation of wastewater treatment

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 563 KiB  
Article
Fungal Arsenic Tolerance and Bioaccumulation: Local Strains from Polluted Water vs. Allochthonous Strains
by Laura Canonica, Grazia Cecchi, Vittorio Capra, Simone Di Piazza, Alessandro Girelli, Sandro Zappatore and Mirca Zotti
Environments 2024, 11(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments11010023 - 22 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1681
Abstract
The paper deals with the possible use of fungi to decontaminate polluted waters. Specifically, the focus is the selection of the most promising fungal strain capable of bioaccumulating arsenic, which is a globally widespread environmental contaminant. To this aim, allochthonous fungal strains from [...] Read more.
The paper deals with the possible use of fungi to decontaminate polluted waters. Specifically, the focus is the selection of the most promising fungal strain capable of bioaccumulating arsenic, which is a globally widespread environmental contaminant. To this aim, allochthonous fungal strains from the ColD UNIGE JRU MIRRI strains collection were selected. Their capability to survive and accumulate this kind of pollutant was evaluated and compared with that of an autochthonous fungi set directly isolated from the arsenic polluted water. A preliminary screening at various concentrations of arsenic (0, 200, 400, 800, 1600 μg L−1) revealed that the best performing strains were Aspergillus niger and Penicillium expansum among the autochthonous strains and Aspergillus niger and Penicillium expansum among the allochthonous strains. Moreover, all the strains were subjected to bioaccumulation tests at a 1600 μg L−1 concentration. Local and allochthonous fungal strains showed different behaviors: the allochthonous strains grew rapidly and in a sustained way but without expressing any bioaccumulation activity. On the contrary, the indigenous fungi, despite a moderate growth, showed a good bioaccumulation capacity (in particular, Aspergillus niger). The results highlight the importance of employing native strains isolated from contaminated matrices to make a mycoremediation protocol more efficient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Technologies for Advanced Water Purification II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1404 KiB  
Article
Synergy Effect during Water Treatment by Electric Discharge and Chlorination
by Antonina P. Malyushevskaya, Piotr Koszelnik, Anna Yushchishina, Olena Mitryasova, Andrii Mats and Renata Gruca-Rokosz
Environments 2023, 10(6), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments10060093 - 1 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1773
Abstract
Water treatment, such as disinfection, is an integral stage of its use for human life. The use of plasma technology with high-voltage electric discharge in a liquid for obtaining a bactericidal effect is discussed. It has been experimentally shown that among the factors [...] Read more.
Water treatment, such as disinfection, is an integral stage of its use for human life. The use of plasma technology with high-voltage electric discharge in a liquid for obtaining a bactericidal effect is discussed. It has been experimentally shown that among the factors accompanying a high-voltage electric discharge in a liquid and affecting the viability of bacteria, cavitation is the main one. Simultaneous use of electric discharge in the special cavitation mode and oxidizing agents makes it possible to achieve stable disinfection of water. At the same time, bactericidal doses of the oxidizing agent are reduced by a factor of 10 relative to existing standards, and the energy costs for electric discharge exposure, enhanced by small doses of an oxidizing agent, are reduced by 6 times compared to the costs of disinfection by only an electric discharge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Technologies for Advanced Water Purification II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 4918 KiB  
Article
Modeling and Optimization of Hexavalent Chromium Adsorption by Activated Eucalyptus Biochar Using Response Surface Methodology and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System
by Adeyinka Sikiru Yusuff, Niyi Babatunde Ishola, Afeez Olayinka Gbadamosi and Emmanuel I. Epelle
Environments 2023, 10(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments10030055 - 17 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2442
Abstract
Due to its excellent textural features, non-toxicity, low cost and high uptake capacity, biochar has been synthesized from various biomasses and utilized as a biosorbent to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) from contaminated water. Herein, activated eucalyptus biochar (AEB) was prepared via [...] Read more.
Due to its excellent textural features, non-toxicity, low cost and high uptake capacity, biochar has been synthesized from various biomasses and utilized as a biosorbent to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) from contaminated water. Herein, activated eucalyptus biochar (AEB) was prepared via a pyrolysis-chemical activation process and then used as a less expensive biosorbent to adsorb Cr6+ ions from an aqueous solution. Proximate, ultimate, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses were employed in appraising the biosorbent characteristics. Furthermore, response surface methodology (RSM) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) were applied to establish the best operating conditions. Based on the results obtained, there was little discrepancy between the observed data and the data predicted by RSM and ANFIS approaches. In terms of prediction accuracy, ANFIS (MAE = 2.512 and R2=0.9200) was superior to RSM (MAE = 2.512 and R2=0.9002). Under best-optimized conditions (initial Cr6+ concentration = 38.14 mg/L, biosorbent dosage = 1.33 g/L and pH = 4.35), which were offered by the ANFIS–ACO technique, the maximum percentage removal of 99.92 ± 0.18% was achieved. The AEB performed exceptionally well due to its better textural characteristics, well-developed porous framework, and dominance of active surface functional groups, which were confirmed by BET, SEM, and FTIR analyses. The comparison of RSM, ACO and GA for process parameter optimization has not been reported in the open literature for Cr6+ adsorption by AEB and hence has been shown in this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Technologies for Advanced Water Purification II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop