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Burial Characteristics and Exploitation of Natural Gas Hydrate

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "H: Geo-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 1968

Special Issue Editors

Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.4 Nengyuan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640, China
Interests: marine geology; phase change and biogeochemical reaction; experimental and numerical simulation; formation and deposition of gas hydrates

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Guest Editor
School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai 519082, China
Interests: marine geology; deep-water deposition; oil; gas; gas hydrates
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

For this Special Issue, we seek papers contributing to the survey, exploration and exploitation of natural gas hydrates, appropriate topics including the field, experimental, or computational-based approaches.

The Guest Editor invites submissions to a Special Issue of Energies regarding the subject area of “Burial Characteristics and Exploitation of Natural Gas Hydrate”. Gas hydrate is a potential energy resource possibly able to enhance climate change and trigger a submarine geohazard, its inventory capable of being 1-7000 × 1015 m3 methane, most located in the continental slopes and less than 10% in the permafrost region. A popular topic for more than two decades, several field trails have been conducted in both the permafrost and slopes.

This Special Issue will focus on the burial characteristics of hydrates in reservoirs, as well as the advances and challenges of their exploitation, topics of interest for publication including, but not limited to:

  • Burial of sediments and organic matter;
  • Degradation of organic matter;
  • Methane production and consumption;
  • Characteristics of the reservoir, deposits and sediments;
  • Rock–water interaction;
  • Biogeochemical reaction and authigenic minerals;
  • Bottom-simulating reflector (BSR);
  • Gas, water and sand production;
  • Depressurization;
  • Thermal stimulation;
  • CO2 injection;
  • N2 injection;
  • Instability of the reservoir;
  • Experimental and numerical simulations.

Dr. Lihua Liu
Prof. Dr. Ming Su
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural gas hydrate
  • gas production
  • sedimentation rate
  • stability of the reservoir
  • sand production
  • authigenic mineral
  • bottom-simulating reflector (BSR)
  • numerical simulation
  • biogeochemical reaction

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 7655 KiB  
Article
Integration of Pore-Scale Visualization and an Ultrasonic Test System of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments
by Qingtao Bu, Qingguo Meng, Jie Dong, Chengfeng Li, Changling Liu, Jinhuan Zhao, Zihao Wang, Wengao Zhao, Jiale Kang and Gaowei Hu
Energies 2022, 15(14), 4938; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15144938 - 06 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1308
Abstract
The acoustic characteristics of hydrates are important parameters in geophysical hydrate exploration and hydrate resource estimation. The microscale distribution of hydrate has an important influence on the acoustic response of a hydrate-bearing reservoir. Although microscale hydrate distributions can be determined using means such [...] Read more.
The acoustic characteristics of hydrates are important parameters in geophysical hydrate exploration and hydrate resource estimation. The microscale distribution of hydrate has an important influence on the acoustic response of a hydrate-bearing reservoir. Although microscale hydrate distributions can be determined using means such as X-ray computed tomography (X-CT), it is difficult to obtain acoustic parameters for the same sample. In this study, we developed an experimental system that integrated pore-scale visualization and an ultrasonic testing system for methane-hydrate-bearing sediments. Simultaneous X-CT observation and acoustic detection could be achieved in the same hydrate sample, which provided a new method for synchronously monitoring microscale distributions during acoustic testing of natural gas hydrate samples. Hydrate formation experiments were carried out in sandy sediments, during which the acoustic characteristics of hydrate-bearing sediments were detected, while X-ray computed tomography was performed simultaneously. This study found that hydrates formed mainly at the gas–water interface in the early stage, mainly in the pore fluid in the middle stage, and came into contact with sediments in the later stage. The development of this experimental device solved the difficult problem of determining the quantitative relationship between the microscale hydrate distribution and the acoustic properties of the reservoir. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burial Characteristics and Exploitation of Natural Gas Hydrate)
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