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Algae Fuel 2015

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2015) | Viewed by 24194

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Center for Biorefining, Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, 1390 Eckles Ave., St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
Interests: pyrolysis; hydrothermal liquefaction; microalgae; food processing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

The desire to increase biofuels production has renewed interest in algal biomass. In recent years, algae related research has been expanded far beyond biofuels, and is going in new directions. The interest in using algae as a vehicle for the production of chemicals, nutraceuticals, medicine, foods, feeds, pigments, etc., and as a means of waste utilization and management, is growing rapidly. This Special Issue is to solicit high quality and original research contributions and critical reviews on all aspects of algae-based technologies, including strain selection and development, cultivation techniques and facilities, harvest, downstream processing, biorefining approach to product development, techno-economic analysis, life cycle analysis, energy policy, etc.

Keywords

  • algae
  • microalgae
  • macroalgae
  • biorefining
  • biofuels
  • chemicals
  • nutraceuticals
  • medicine
  • foods
  • feeds
  • pigments
  • waste treatment
  • waste management
  • cultivation
  • harvest
  • downstream processing
  • techno-economic analysis
  • life cycle analysis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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2145 KiB  
Article
Integration of Microalgae-Based Bioenergy Production into a Petrochemical Complex: Techno-Economic Assessment
by Ana L. Gonçalves, Maria C. M. Alvim-Ferraz, Fernando G. Martins, Manuel Simões and José C. M. Pires
Energies 2016, 9(4), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/en9040224 - 23 Mar 2016
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 6131
Abstract
The rapid development of modern society has resulted in an increased demand for energy, mainly from fossil fuels. The use of this source of energy has led to the accumulation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. In this context, microalgae [...] Read more.
The rapid development of modern society has resulted in an increased demand for energy, mainly from fossil fuels. The use of this source of energy has led to the accumulation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. In this context, microalgae culturing may be an effective solution to reduce the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, since these microorganisms can capture CO2 and, simultaneously, produce bioenergy. This work consists of a techno-economic assessment of a microalgal production facility integrated in a petrochemical complex, in which established infrastructure allows efficient material and energy transport. Seven different scenarios were considered regarding photosynthetic, lipids extraction and anaerobic digestion efficiencies. This analysis has demonstrated six economically viable scenarios able to: (i) reduce CO2 emissions from a thermoelectric power plant; (ii) treat domestic wastewaters (which were used as culture medium); and (iii) produce lipids and electrical and thermal energy. For a 100-ha facility, considering a photosynthetic efficiency of 3%, a lipids extraction efficiency of 75% and an anaerobic digestion efficiency of 45% (scenario 3), an economically viable process was obtained (net present value of 22.6 million euros), being effective in both CO2 removal (accounting for 1.1 × 104 t per year) and energy production (annual energy produced was 1.6 × 107 kWh and annual lipids productivity was 1.9 × 103 m3). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Algae Fuel 2015)
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Review

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845 KiB  
Review
The Environmental Biorefinery: Using Microalgae to Remediate Wastewater, a Win-Win Paradigm
by Florian Delrue, Pablo David Álvarez-Díaz, Sophie Fon-Sing, Gatien Fleury and Jean-François Sassi
Energies 2016, 9(3), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/en9030132 - 25 Feb 2016
Cited by 144 | Viewed by 11347
Abstract
Microalgae have been shown to be a source of multiple bio-based products ranging from high value molecules to commodities. Along with their potential to produce a large variety of products, microalgae can also be used for the depollution of wastewaters of different origins [...] Read more.
Microalgae have been shown to be a source of multiple bio-based products ranging from high value molecules to commodities. Along with their potential to produce a large variety of products, microalgae can also be used for the depollution of wastewaters of different origins (urban, industrial, and agricultural). This paper is focused on the importance of harnessing the bioremediation capacity of microalgae to treat wastewaters in order to develop the microalgae industry (especially the microalgae biofuel industry) and to find other alternatives to the classic wastewater treatment processes. The current research on the potential of microalgae to treat a specific wastewater or a targeted pollutant is reviewed and discussed. Then, both strategies of selecting the best microalgae strain to treat a specific wastewater or pollutant and using a natural or an artificial consortium to perform the treatment will be detailed. The process options for treating wastewaters using microalgae will be discussed up to the final valorization of the biomass. The last part is dedicated to the challenges which research need to address in order to develop the potential of microalgae to treat wastewaters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Algae Fuel 2015)
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Other

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1486 KiB  
Technical Note
Evaluation of Cell Disruption of Chlorella Vulgaris by Pressure-Assisted Ozonation and Ultrasonication
by Yuanxing Huang, Shengnan Qin, Daofang Zhang, Liang Li and Yan Mu
Energies 2016, 9(3), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/en9030173 - 08 Mar 2016
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 5883
Abstract
This study evaluated the effectiveness of pressure-assisted ozonation (PAO) in Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) cell disruption, and compared the disruption result with that of the ultrasonication (US) by using four quantification indicators: cell counting, ultra violet (UV) absorbance, turbidity and visible [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the effectiveness of pressure-assisted ozonation (PAO) in Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) cell disruption, and compared the disruption result with that of the ultrasonication (US) by using four quantification indicators: cell counting, ultra violet (UV) absorbance, turbidity and visible light absorbance. It was found that under the condition of 0.8 MPa and 80 cycles, PAO treatment achieved cell rupture of 80.3%, with the power of 1080 W and treatment time of 60 min, US achieved cell rupture of 83.8%. Cell counting was a reliable indicator and applicable to both PAO and US treatments. Turbidity and visible light absorbance gave similar results and featured as the simplest operation. UV absorbance reflected the metabolite release due to cell breakage; however, it was less reproducible when it was applied to quantify the cell rupture by PAO. Its trend indicated that during cell disruption metabolite degradation occurred, especially after significant rupture in the case of excessive PAO treatment. The cellular morphology of C. vulgaris cells during PAO and US treatments was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) which certified that the cells damage was caused by both physical and chemical attack. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Algae Fuel 2015)
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