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Decoupling Economic Growth from Energy Use: Transition to the Low Carbon Economy

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "C: Energy Economics and Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2022) | Viewed by 10186

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Economic growth has been strongly correlated to energy use for a long time. Any increase in the energy demand has historically been associated with a positive change in economic growth. Events impacting energy markets such as the rise in energy prices, decrease in the energy demand, geopolitical concerns or changes in energy production or holding costs impact economic growth.

On the other side, it is well documented that any increase in energy use generates more carbon emissions and causes environmental quality degradation. Climate change is a global challenge and countries across the world are trying to take actions to avoid its negative effects. Mitigation and adaptation of the effects of climate change needs the implementation of strategies that rely on “decoupling”. In this matter, it should be raised the issue of how energy use can be decoupled from economic growth. The increase of energy efficiency use, the green energy sources (replacing non-renewables with renewables), the use of new technologies in the energy sector and circularization of resources can lead to decoupling the economic growth from carbon emissions. The importance of clean energies is increasing, and technological innovation can be seen as a solution for green growth.

To contribute to the ongoing debate on how to enhance sustainable and green growth, the proposed special issue welcomes papers on green growth and decoupling economic growth from energy use. In this matter, any proposed innovative solutions to shift toward green growth, or the ways how to decouple economic growth from carbon emissions are especially welcomed.

Potential subtopics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Links between Economic Growth and Energy Consumption
  • Economic Growth and Energy Efficiency
  • Renewable energies and Economic Growth
  • Paris Agreement, Economic Growth, and Energy consumption
  • Energy sector in the National Determined Contributions
  • Sustainable Energy Consumption
  • Green Economic Growth and Clean Energy Demand
  • Innovation and managing environmental challenges
  • Energy efficiency and sustainable development goals' achievement
  • Climate finance
  • Green bonds
  • Environmental innovation
  • Others

Prof. Dr. Adel Ben Youssef
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Green Growth
  • Low Carbon Economies
  • Decoupling
  • Economic Growth
  • Energy Use
  • Renewable Energies
  • Sustainable Energy Consumption
  • Clean Energy Demand
  • Environmentally-friendly technologies
  • Innovation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 280 KiB  
Article
Improving ICTs (Mobile Phone and Internet) for Environmental Sustainability in the Western Balkan Countries
by But Dedaj, Gokcen Ogruk-Maz, Mjellma Carabregu-Vokshi, Luljeta Aliu-Mulaj and Khalid M. Kisswani
Energies 2022, 15(11), 4111; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15114111 - 3 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1554
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to replicate an existing study using the Generalized Method of Moments on the impact of ICT penetration (Mobile Phone and Internet) in Western Balkan countries on environmental sustainability through changing CO2 emissions for the period 2000–2015. [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to replicate an existing study using the Generalized Method of Moments on the impact of ICT penetration (Mobile Phone and Internet) in Western Balkan countries on environmental sustainability through changing CO2 emissions for the period 2000–2015. A two-step system GMM method is used to handle both endogeneity of the independent and persistency of the dependent variables. Two important findings are derived: First, we find that mobile phones have a positive impact, whereas the Internet has a positive but insignificant impact on CO2 emissions per capita in noninteractive models. The impact of ICTs is insignificant as far as CO2 emission from liquid fuel consumption is concerned in noninteractive specifications. Based on this finding, we suggest policymakers of Western Balkan countries follow interdisciplinary policies and strategies considering ICTs such as Internet penetration to mitigate CO2 emissions. Second, in interactive models, all marginal effects are negative, and in one specification the impact is statistically significant. We argue that increasing Internet penetration has a negative net effect on CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption. By calculating the policy threshold for this net effect, we discuss the practical implications for policy making in Kosovo where the average Internet penetration is below this threshold. Full article
15 pages, 1015 KiB  
Article
Decoupling Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Economic Growth: A Case Study of Tunisia
by Mounir Dahmani, Mohamed Mabrouki and Ludovic Ragni
Energies 2021, 14(22), 7550; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14227550 - 12 Nov 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 1828
Abstract
The study examined the impact of different factors on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, by applying the extended STIRPAT model and decoupling analysis for Tunisia for the period 1990–2018. Furthermore, the study utilizes Tapio decoupling model, and the Auto-Regressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bounds test [...] Read more.
The study examined the impact of different factors on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, by applying the extended STIRPAT model and decoupling analysis for Tunisia for the period 1990–2018. Furthermore, the study utilizes Tapio decoupling model, and the Auto-Regressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bounds test approach to examine the relationship between the variables of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, economic growth, energy consumption, urbanization, innovation, and trade openness. The findings validated an inverted U-shape relationship between GDP and GHG emissions. In addition, we find that the consumption of renewable energy contributes to the reduction of GHG emissions in the long run. The findings call authority for the adaption of the regulatory framework relating to energy management, energy efficiency and the development of renewable energies, as well as to initiate energy market reforms, implement mitigation strategies and encourage investments in clean energies. Full article
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18 pages, 1771 KiB  
Article
The Role of the Key Components of Renewable Energy (Combustible Renewables and Waste) in the Context of CO2 Emissions and Economic Growth of Selected Countries in Europe
by Shahjahan Ali, Shahnaj Akter and Csaba Fogarassy
Energies 2021, 14(8), 2034; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14082034 - 7 Apr 2021
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2452
Abstract
In the case of developing countries, it is not clear which crisis management tools will ensure sustainable development in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way, as well as reducing CO2 emissions in addition to ensuring GDP growth. The next analysis discusses the [...] Read more.
In the case of developing countries, it is not clear which crisis management tools will ensure sustainable development in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way, as well as reducing CO2 emissions in addition to ensuring GDP growth. The next analysis discusses the details of this issue. The study explores the connection between per capita GDP, emission of CO2, combustible energy, and waste consumption. The Hausman test ratifies that the regression model with the fixed effect is the proper method for the panel balanced data from 1990 to 2019 in the selected 13 countries of the EU. This study ordered the data into three categories (for 13 selected countries, the top nine EU countries (in GDP), and Visegrad countries (Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic and Poland)). The study found a significant positive effect of combustible energy and waste consumption and the negative impact of CO2 emission on GDP per capita. The cointegration test confirms that all three variables are cointegrated. This implies a long-term link among all three variables in the context of all three types of the selected panel. The Granger causality results ensure that there is a two-way cause–effect relation between the variables. The study strongly recommends that developed European Union countries (the top nine EU countries) increase energy production from biomass-based renewable energy and waste to stimulate economic growth. The same strategy was not recommended in the Visegrad countries because of the much lower GDP growth due to the N-shaped Kuznets curve. In these countries, it is advisable to avoid unexpected increases in CO2 emissions from biomass and fossil fuel-burning, to achieve greenhouse gas reductions using other circular, platform-based models instead of simple biomass energy production. Due to the low level of energy efficiency and the lack of application of technological innovation, the energy use of biomass can significantly slow down GDP growth in less developed EU countries (such as the V4 countries). Full article
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24 pages, 2534 KiB  
Article
Impact of Clean Energy on CO2 Emissions and Economic Growth within the Phases of Renewables Diffusion in Selected European Countries
by Mariola Piłatowska and Andrzej Geise
Energies 2021, 14(4), 812; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14040812 - 4 Feb 2021
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 2920
Abstract
This study explores the impact of clean energy and non-renewable energy consumption on CO2 emissions and economic growth within two phases (formative and expansion) of renewable energy diffusion for three selected countries (France, Spain, and Sweden). The vector autoregression (VAR) model is [...] Read more.
This study explores the impact of clean energy and non-renewable energy consumption on CO2 emissions and economic growth within two phases (formative and expansion) of renewable energy diffusion for three selected countries (France, Spain, and Sweden). The vector autoregression (VAR) model is estimated on the basis of annual data disaggregated into quarterly data. The Granger causality results reveal distinctive differences in the causality patterns across countries and two phases of renewables diffusion. Clean energy consumption contributes to a decline of emissions more clearly in the expansion phase in France and Spain. However, this effect seems to be counteracted by the increases in emissions due to economic growth and non-renewable energy consumption. Therefore, clean energy consumption has not yet led to a decoupling of economic growth from emissions in France and Spain; in contrast, the findings for Sweden evidence such a decoupling due to the neutrality between economic growth and emissions. Generally, the findings show that despite the enormous growth of renewables and active mitigation policies, CO2 emissions have not substantially decreased in selected countries or globally. Focused and coordinated policy action, not only at the EU level but also globally, is urgently needed to overhaul existing fossil-fuel economies into low-carbon economies and ultimately meet the relevant climate targets. Full article
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