energies-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Sustainable Energy Artificial Islands

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A: Sustainable Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 3200

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
Interests: sustainable energy systems; building-integrated sustainable energy systems; circular economy; building circularity; circular value chain; sustainable development goals; LCA; sustainable engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3004-531 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: sustainable energy islands; sustainable energy systems; wind energy technology; wind energy structures; wind turbine towers; sustainable development; aluminium structures; structural steelwork; robustness of sustainable energy systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of Sustainable Energy Artificial Islands (SEAI) is, nowadays, proposed as an optimised sustainable energy mega-system to enhance the sustainability and resilience of the environment. The recent communications of international and national centres of decision define their strong resolve to quickly and efficiently respond to the climate and environmental-related challenges that are this generation’s defining task. This is a new growth strategy that aims to transform countries into a fair and prosperous society, with a modern, resource-efficient, and competitive economy where there are no net emissions of greenhouse gases in 2050, where the environment and health of citizens are protected, and where economic growth is decoupled from resource use. A sustainable globe requires significant investment efforts across all sectors of the economy and, in particular, in sustainable energy. Aiming to successfully reach the 2030 climate and energy targets, including at least 40% cuts in greenhouse gas emissions with reference to 1990 levels and at least a 32% share for renewable energy, additional investments per year by 2030 will be required. Already, many countries confirmed their intention to present an impact-assessed plan to strongly increase their climate ambitions for 2030; therefore, additional investments will be necessary to achieve the broader environmental objectives that they set.

Besides the strategic decisions that need to be made to proceed toward a sustainable future in the built environment, sustainable energy technology has seen, in recent decades, very fast growth, much beyond the early stage concepts of ocean thermal energy. In addition, innovative technologies have been recently developed to store the produced sustainable energy locally; then, the energy is transferred using smart systems to improve network efficiency, which have been investigated and developed. Nowadays, there are more than 350,000 wind turbines spinning around the globe, with about 10% of them combined with alternative sustainable energy systems (photovoltaics, wave and tidal energy systems, etc.). Due to continuous technological advances, the concept of Sustainable Energy Artificial Islands (i.e., offshore wind power combined with other renewable energy sources and energy storage) seems to have recently become far more cost effective and much more widespread than expected, and energy islands are foreseen to become, during the next decade, the top source of sustainable energy generating capacity in Europe, in the USA and in Canada, and the second largest in China.

As a matter of fact, according to the experience gained in Japan, Singapore, Denmark, the UK and elsewhere, the related projects during pre-design, design, construction, maintenance and demolition have a lot of problems that need investigation, analysis, design, realisation and scientific discussion. Therefore, the proposed Special Issue is expected to be a unique forum where all the above-mentioned phenomena, difficulties, discrepancies and prospects of applications will be collected and scientifically discussed.

Prof. Dr. Charalampos Baniotopoulos
Dr. Carlos Rebelo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • imised
  • conceptual design of Sustainable Energy Artificial Islands (SEAI) (shape, material, type of island)
  • sustainable energy source potential (wind, wave, solar, etc.)
  • modular floating systems—design, optimisation and interconnection of modules
  • mooring systems
  • optimised application of SEAI
  • mitigation of oscillations in SEAI
  • green hydrogen production and transportation
  • electrical network challenges in SEAI
  • construction management in SEAI projects
  • sustainability analysis, LCA of SEAI
  • resilience of SEAI
  • maintenance of SEAI

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

20 pages, 5929 KiB  
Article
Passive Shunted Piezoelectric Systems for Vibration Control of Wind Turbine Towers: A Feasibility Study
by Maria-Styliani Daraki, Konstantinos Marakakis, Panagiotis Alevras, Georgia A. Foutsitzi and Georgios E. Stavroulakis
Energies 2024, 17(10), 2420; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17102420 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 673
Abstract
Many countries have a variety of offshore and onshore wind turbines that face extreme aging challenges. Issues with harmful vibrations that must be minimized are addressed in this paper. A new method of wind turbine tower vibration control using piezoelectricity and shunt circuits [...] Read more.
Many countries have a variety of offshore and onshore wind turbines that face extreme aging challenges. Issues with harmful vibrations that must be minimized are addressed in this paper. A new method of wind turbine tower vibration control using piezoelectricity and shunt circuits is proposed in this paper. The passive vibration control method is shown to improve the tower’s structural performance under various environmental loads, like wind and seismic excitations. To examine the effectiveness of the suggested shunted piezoelectric system, a simple surrogate finite element model of a wind turbine tower is considered, and various investigations at the second eigenfrequency are carried out. An alternative way of modeling the studied structure is considered and the results demonstrate better performance. The advantages of setting up structural damping systems for decreasing tower vibrational loads and boosting their structural stability and resilience against extreme events are highlighted throughout this work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Energy Artificial Islands)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 7216 KiB  
Article
Conceptual Design of a Floating Modular Energy Island for Energy Independency: A Case Study in Crete
by Ika Kurniawati, Beatriz Beaumont, Ramon Varghese, Danka Kostadinović, Ivan Sokol, Hassan Hemida, Panagiotis Alevras and Charalampos Baniotopoulos
Energies 2023, 16(16), 5921; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16165921 - 10 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1969
Abstract
This paper aims to investigate the development of a floating artificial sustainable energy island at a conceptual design level that would enhance the energy independence of islands focusing on a case study on the island of Crete. This paper provides a baseline assessment [...] Read more.
This paper aims to investigate the development of a floating artificial sustainable energy island at a conceptual design level that would enhance the energy independence of islands focusing on a case study on the island of Crete. This paper provides a baseline assessment showing the immense potential of wind and solar energy in and around Crete integrating the third significant renewable energy source (RES) of ocean waves into the energy island. The selection of the best location for the floating offshore platforms that compose the energy island is addressed through exploiting the great potential of the above-mentioned RES, taking into consideration criteria with regard to several significant human activities. To this end, the concept of an innovative floating modular energy island (FMEI) that integrates different renewable energy resources is proposed; in addition, a case study that focuses on the energy independency of a big island illustrates the concept referring to the substitution of the local thermal power plants that are currently in operation in Crete with sustainable energy power. Although focused on the renewable energy resources around Crete, the work of this paper provides a basis for a systematic offshore renewable energy assessment as it proposes a new methodology that could be used anywhere around the globe. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Energy Artificial Islands)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop