State-of-the-Art and New Trends of Power Electronics Technologies and Applications

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Power Electronics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 11826

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Electronics, School of Engineering, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes, Portugal
Interests: power electronics; power quality; active power filters; renewable energy; energy efficiency; electric vehicles; energy storage systems; battery charging systems; smart grids; smart cities; smart homes; technologies for innovative railway systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Algoritmi Research Centre, Department of Industrial Electronics, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: power electronics converters; electric mobility; renewable energy sources; digital control techniques; smart grids
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Power electronics is a comprehensive research area that cuts across many areas of application, having contributed decisively, over several decades, to revolutionizing the lives of citizens and to the modernization and evolution of the vast majority of technologies that we use today, as well as increasing industrial competitiveness in all sectors of activity. Moreover, power electronics is essential for driving the evolution of different assets in the new paradigm of smart grids, covering an enormous range of applications, such as renewables, energy storage systems, load-shift systems, electric mobility, innovative railway systems, solid-state transformers, active rectifiers, power quality conditioners, motor drivers, and also modern industrial processes. Additionally, it is important to highlight that the rapid evolution of power electronics is based on emerging technologies both for the power stage (e.g., new power semiconductors and passive components) and for the control system (e.g., innovative microprocessors and control algorithms). Embracing all these subjects in a transversal way, this Special Issue targets to institute a channel among the well-established state-of-the-art and the new trends of power electronics technologies and applications, linking novel contributions from academics, scientists, and researchers.

The topics of interest are related, but not limited to the following:

  • Power electronics for electric mobility (e.g., charging and traction systems).
  • Power electronics for renewables, energy storage, and load-shift systems.
  • Power electronics for power quality conditioners.
  • Power electronics for wireless power transfer (WPT) systems.
  • Power electronics for industrial electric machine drivers and integrated motor drivers.
  • Solid-state transformers based on power electronics for smart grids.
  • Power electronics for ac, dc, and hybrid power grids.
  • Sustainable electrical power systems supported by power electronics.
  • Smart homes, smart cities, and smart grids enabled by power electronics.
  • Advanced topologies of multilevel and modular power electronics converters.
  • Digital control strategies (e.g., power theories, predictive control, modulation techniques) for power electronics.
  • Advances in digital control platforms (e.g., microprocessors, microcontrollers, DSP, FPGA, real-time HIL) for power electronics.
  • Reliability and lifetime prediction of power electronics converters.
  • High-performance magnetic and capacitor technologies for power electronics converters.
  • Wide-band-gap (WBG) technologies (e.g., SiC, GaN) for power electronics applications.
  • New technologies of gate drivers and protection circuits for WBG technologies applied to power electronics applications.
  • Electromagnetic interferences in power electronics.
  • Innovative soft-switching techniques for power electronics converters.
  • Design of snubber circuits for power electronics converters.
  • High-power and high-density power electronics applications.

Dr. João L. Afonso
Dr. Vítor Monteiro
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 5705 KiB  
Article
Design and Implementation of CNFET SRAM Cells by Using Multi-Threshold Technique
by Shanmugam Kavitha, Chandrasekaran Kumar, Hady H. Fayek and Eugen Rusu
Electronics 2023, 12(7), 1611; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics12071611 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1894
Abstract
This paper presents a CNFET (Carbon Nano-tube FET) based MT (Multi-Threshold)-SRAM (Static Random Access Memory) design based on the leakage reduction mechanism. A multi-threshold logic is employed for reducing the leakage current during read/write operations. Here, the multi-threshold technique is used to insert [...] Read more.
This paper presents a CNFET (Carbon Nano-tube FET) based MT (Multi-Threshold)-SRAM (Static Random Access Memory) design based on the leakage reduction mechanism. A multi-threshold logic is employed for reducing the leakage current during read/write operations. Here, the multi-threshold technique is used to insert the high threshold sleep control to the low threshold circuit. The insertion is performed in a serial manner. The high threshold transistors are very useful for deriving the low sub-threshold current. Meanwhile, the low threshold transistors are promising for improving the circuit performance. The high-low threshold transistor pairs are used to change the channel length by modifying the oxide thickness of the transistors. The overall implementation of the Multi-threshold-based SRAM cells are implemented with the help of CNFET in-order to avoid the short channel effect, mobility degradation which is occurred while considering the channel length below 32 nm in CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) devices. The paper clearly represents the performance improvement of the proposed SRAM cells with above-mentioned technologies. Full article
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22 pages, 7446 KiB  
Article
Development and Experimental Validation of a Reduced-Scale Single-Phase Modular Multilevel Converter Applied to a Railway Static Converter
by Nuno Rodrigues, Jose Cunha, Vitor Monteiro and Joao L. Afonso
Electronics 2023, 12(6), 1367; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics12061367 - 13 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1065
Abstract
With special emphasis in recent years, an increase has been verified not only in demand but also in the price of electricity, arising the need to develop more reliable and efficient electrical energy conversion systems. In this context, emerges the utilization of the [...] Read more.
With special emphasis in recent years, an increase has been verified not only in demand but also in the price of electricity, arising the need to develop more reliable and efficient electrical energy conversion systems. In this context, emerges the utilization of the modular multilevel converter (MMC) based on submodules. The key to the MMC is modularity, which allows the converter to reach higher performance levels, improving the voltage and current output signals of the converter, in a compact solution. The modularity concept allows the increase of the operation voltage using submodules in series, and the increase of the operating current using submodules in parallel. Additionally, in the event of a submodule malfunction, the converter can be reconfigured and continue the operation, albeit at a lower power level. Due to its versatility, the MMC can be used in a variety of applications, such as HVDC power transmission systems, solid-state transformers, renewable energy interfaces, and more recently, railway power systems. In this context, this paper focuses on the development and experimental validation of a single-phase MMC based on the use of half-bridge submodules applied to a railway static converter, where the main focus lies on the AC side control. The control algorithms are fully described for a single-phase MMC reduced-scale prototype implemented (500 W, 230 V–50 Hz, 200 VDC), connecting two submodules in series in the upper arm, two submodules also in series in the lower arm, the respective driver and command circuits, sensing and signal conditioning circuits, as well as a digital control platform recurring to the DSP TMS320F28379D. Experimental results were obtained to validate each submodule individually, and, later, to verify the operation of the MMC with the set of four submodules. Full article
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19 pages, 10884 KiB  
Article
Experimental Validation of a Bidirectional Multilevel dc–dc Power Converter for Electric Vehicle Battery Charging Operating under Normal and Fault Conditions
by Vitor Monteiro, Catia F. Oliveira and Joao L. Afonso
Electronics 2023, 12(4), 851; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics12040851 - 08 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1568
Abstract
This paper presents a bidirectional multilevel dc–dc power converter for electric vehicle (EV) battery charging. The operating principle of the power converter was presented, analyzed, and experimentally validated under normal and fault conditions. The topology under study was integrated into a bipolar dc [...] Read more.
This paper presents a bidirectional multilevel dc–dc power converter for electric vehicle (EV) battery charging. The operating principle of the power converter was presented, analyzed, and experimentally validated under normal and fault conditions. The topology under study was integrated into a bipolar dc grid through the split dc-link of the bidirectional multilevel dc–dc power converter. Considering the failures that can occur in the bipolar dc grid, i.e., in each wire of the bipolar dc grid (positive, negative, and neutral), it was experimentally verified that the dc–dc power converter ensures that the EV battery-charging process continues, regardless of the occurrence or absence of open-circuit failures. In light of this fact, the proposed control algorithms and the presented topology were validated through a set of considerable simulation and experimental results, analyzing the distinct states of the power semiconductors, which compose the bidirectional multilevel dc–dc power converter, for distinct conditions of operation. The developed laboratory prototype of the bidirectional multilevel dc–dc power converter for EV battery charging, which was implemented to obtain the experimental results, is described in detail in this paper. The experimental validation was carried out for the main different fault conditions in the bipolar dc grid in terms of open-circuit failures and, moreover, considering the steady-state and transient-state operations of the dc–dc power converter. The experimental analysis demonstrated that even in the presence of failures in the positive, negative, or neutral wires of the bipolar dc grid, the bidirectional multilevel dc–dc power converter guarantees the correct EV battery-charging operation. Full article
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8 pages, 2000 KiB  
Article
Radiation and Annealing Effects on GaN MOSFETs Irradiated by 1 MeV Electrons
by Tongshan Lu and Chenghua Wang
Electronics 2022, 11(8), 1186; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics11081186 - 08 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1398
Abstract
In this paper, the 650 V N-channel GaN MOSFETs are chosen as the research object to study the radiation and annealing effects under 1 MeV electron irradiation. The output, transfer, and breakdown characteristics are measured before and after electron irradiation. The experimental results [...] Read more.
In this paper, the 650 V N-channel GaN MOSFETs are chosen as the research object to study the radiation and annealing effects under 1 MeV electron irradiation. The output, transfer, and breakdown characteristics are measured before and after electron irradiation. The experimental results show the variation of the I-V curves after irradiation, which is related to the increased conductivity due to the generation of an oxide charge in the GaN MOSFETs. However, the gradual formation of the interface trapped charge offsets the effect of the oxide charge, which decreases the conductivity of the GaN MOSFETs and the drain-source current. The long-term annealing at room temperature degrades the interface trapped charges, leading to the restoration of the I-V characteristics. After room temperature annealing, the breakdown voltage is still higher than the unirradiated level, and this is because the displacement defects caused by electron irradiation cannot be recovered at room temperature. Full article
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15 pages, 4821 KiB  
Article
Demystifying Non-Isolated DC–DC Topologies on Partial Power Processing Architectures
by Jon Anzola, Iosu Aizpuru, Asier Arruti, Jesus Sergio Artal-Sevil and Carlos Bernal
Electronics 2022, 11(3), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics11030480 - 06 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1813
Abstract
This paper discusses the possibility of achieving partial power processing with non-isolated DC–DC topologies. To this end, partial power converter architectures are seen as an interesting solution for reducing the power processed by the converter. We observed via simulations that single-inductor non-isolated topologies [...] Read more.
This paper discusses the possibility of achieving partial power processing with non-isolated DC–DC topologies. To this end, partial power converter architectures are seen as an interesting solution for reducing the power processed by the converter. We observed via simulations that single-inductor non-isolated topologies cannot achieve partial power processing since the obtained current and voltage waveforms were the same as those found in a full-power converter. However, when using double inductor non-isolated topologies, reduced current and improved efficiencies were achieved. In order to confirm the results obtained from the simulations, single- and double-inductor topologies were tested experimentally. Finally, it was concluded that a double-inductor non-isolated topology can improve its performance by using partial power processing. Full article
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21 pages, 8005 KiB  
Article
A Novel Switched-Capacitor Inverter with Reduced Capacitance and Balanced Neutral-Point Voltage
by Zhuyu Xun, Hongfa Ding and Zhou He
Electronics 2021, 10(8), 947; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10080947 - 16 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2128
Abstract
A novel three-phase switched-capacitor multilevel inverter (SCMLI) with reduced capacitance and balanced neutral-point voltage is proposed in this paper. Applying only one DC source, the three-phase seven-level topology possessing voltage-boosting capability is accomplished without the high-voltage stress of power switches. Owing to the [...] Read more.
A novel three-phase switched-capacitor multilevel inverter (SCMLI) with reduced capacitance and balanced neutral-point voltage is proposed in this paper. Applying only one DC source, the three-phase seven-level topology possessing voltage-boosting capability is accomplished without the high-voltage stress of power switches. Owing to the inherent redundant switching states of the proposed topology, two charging approaches that can effectively limit the voltage ripples and path selection for capacitors can be realized. This provides the presented topology with reduced capacitance, balanced neutral-point voltage, good performance in not only the three-phase four-wire system but also the three-phase three-wire system, and low total harmonic distortion (THD) of the output voltage. A comprehensive comparison with previous SCMLIs in various aspects is conducted to validate the merits mentioned above. The simulation results accord with theoretical analyses, confirming the feasibility of the proposed three-phase SCMLI. Full article
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