Health Sciences before, during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 23933

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, "Carol Davila” University, 8 Eroii Sanitari Boulevard, 050474 Bucharest, Romania
2. Center of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Fundeni Clinical Institute, 258 Fundeni Road, 022328 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: cancer diagnostics; haematology; oncology; internal medicine; natural products; myeloproliferative neoplasms; lymphoproliferative neoplasms; diabetes; obesity; oxidative stress; antioxidants; inflammation

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Co-Guest Editor
1. Department of Pathophysiology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, 200349 Craiova, Romania
2. Clinic of Hematology, Filantropia City Hospital, 200143 Craiova, Romania
Interests: hematology; internal medicine; pathophysiology; modern methods of teaching
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the teaching of health sciences (i.e., medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, midwifery, and nursing) has changed dramatically. Since face-to-face learning was cancelled in the countries severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, most universities implemented online methods of teaching–learning–evaluation to deliver educational content to undergraduate and graduate students. However, especially during a time when there is a great need of well-trained personnel to join the healthcare workforce, the absence of clinical experience might negatively impact on the future prospects of students in the various health science fields.

Apart from the students enrolled in the study of health sciences, the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has drastically changed the practice of medicine in hospitals worldwide. Some patients suffered directly from COVID-19, whereas others experienced the negative impact of the pandemic on the management of their chronic disorders.

This Special Issue aims to explore the theme of “Health Sciences Before, During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic”. Original research articles, short communications, narrative or systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and other submission types dealing with all aspects of health science education during the COVID-19 pandemic are encouraged. In addition, we welcome manuscripts focused on pre-pandemic health science education, as well as future prospects regarding the evolution of this field. Moreover, we welcome the submission of interdisciplinary research (original articles, reviews, case reports, etc., including non-clinical investigations) focused on clinical medicine both before and during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Papers related to clinical medicine but not directly related to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic are also accepted.

Dr. Mihnea-Alexandru Găman
Prof. Dr. Amelia Maria Găman

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • medical teaching
  • medical education
  • clinical medicine
  • burnout
  • anxiety
  • depression
  • modern methods of teaching
  • COVID-19
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • pandemic

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 229 KiB  
Editorial
Health Sciences before, during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Mihnea-Alexandru Găman
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(4), 759-761; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13040057 - 06 Apr 2023
Viewed by 973
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has heavily influenced the teaching and practical training required for students enrolled in health sciences courses globally both at undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate levels [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Sciences before, during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic)

Research

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11 pages, 977 KiB  
Article
The Mediating Role of Job Satisfaction in the Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction among Teachers during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Aleksandra M. Rogowska and Hanna Meres
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(7), 666-676; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12070050 - 21 Jun 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3628
Abstract
This study examines the indirect effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between emotional intelligence and life satisfaction among teachers during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland. A sample of 322 teachers aged 23–71 (M = 45.37, SD = [...] Read more.
This study examines the indirect effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between emotional intelligence and life satisfaction among teachers during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland. A sample of 322 teachers aged 23–71 (M = 45.37, SD = 8.99) participated in a cross-sectional online survey. The online survey (Google form) contained some demographic information and standardized psychological questionnaires: the Multivariate Emotional Intelligence Scale (MEIS) for measuring emotional intelligence, the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ)—a short form for job satisfaction assessment, and the Life Satisfaction Scale (SWLS). Emotional intelligence is a significant positive predictor of job satisfaction and life satisfaction, and job satisfaction is a strong positive predictor of life satisfaction. Job satisfaction partly mediates the relationship between emotional intelligence and life satisfaction. To maintain the well-being of teachers during a pandemic, schools should implement training to improve emotional intelligence and increase job satisfaction by supporting distance e-learning among teachers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Sciences before, during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic)
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18 pages, 6104 KiB  
Article
COVID-19 Limitations on Doodling as a Measure of Burnout
by Carol Nash
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(4), 1688-1705; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11040118 - 16 Dec 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3271
Abstract
Pre-COVID-19, doodling was identified as a measure of burnout in researchers attending a weekly, in-person health narratives research group manifesting team mindfulness. Under the group’s supportive conditions, variations in doodling served to measure change in participants reported depression and anxiety—internal states directly associated [...] Read more.
Pre-COVID-19, doodling was identified as a measure of burnout in researchers attending a weekly, in-person health narratives research group manifesting team mindfulness. Under the group’s supportive conditions, variations in doodling served to measure change in participants reported depression and anxiety—internal states directly associated with burnout, adversely affecting healthcare researchers, their employment, and their research. COVID-19 demanded social distancing during the group’s 2020/21 academic meetings. Conducted online, the group’s participants who chose to doodle did so alone during the pandemic. Whether the sequestering of group participants during COVID-19 altered the ability of doodling to act as a measure of depression and anxiety was investigated. Participants considered that doodling during the group’s online meetings increased their enjoyment and attention level—some expressed that it helped them to relax. However, unlike face-to-face meetings during previous non-COVID-19 years, solitary doodling during online meetings was unable to reflect researchers’ depression or anxiety. The COVID-19 limitations that necessitated doodling alone maintained the benefits group members saw in doodling but hampered the ability of doodling to act as a measure of burnout, in contrast to previous in-person doodling. This result is seen to correspond to one aspect of the group’s change in team mindfulness resulting from COVID-19 constraints. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Sciences before, during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic)
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Review

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10 pages, 956 KiB  
Review
Infrared Radiation in the Management of Musculoskeletal Conditions and Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review
by Christos Tsagkaris, Andreas S. Papazoglou, Anna Eleftheriades, Stavros Tsakopoulos, Athanasios Alexiou, Mihnea-Alexandru Găman and Dimitrios V. Moysidis
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(3), 334-343; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12030024 - 14 Mar 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 9817
Abstract
Infrared radiation (IR) is a promising complementary treatment for musculoskeletal conditions and chronic pain. By means of a systematic review, we evaluated the contribution of IR to the management of these ailments. PubMed-MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane Library–Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were [...] Read more.
Infrared radiation (IR) is a promising complementary treatment for musculoskeletal conditions and chronic pain. By means of a systematic review, we evaluated the contribution of IR to the management of these ailments. PubMed-MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane Library–Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched until 20 December 2021. The literature search yielded 233 relevant records. Following the screening of titles and abstracts, 42 full-texts were evaluated. As per inclusion/exclusion criteria, 13 publications were entered into the qualitative assessment. These studies described the effects of IR in humans: three studies focused on osteoarthritis, four studies on fibromyalgia, and six encompassed a wider range of diseases (ankylosing spondylitis, recovery from sports injuries, myofascial pain syndrome). Based on the findings of our systematic review, we noted a decrease in pain levels, as evaluated by the visual analog scale (VAS), in patients suffering from musculoskeletal disorders treated with IR. In addition, IR use led to a decrease in Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FiQ) scores in subjects diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Nevertheless, IR has failed to facilitate muscle recovery following athletic injuries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Sciences before, during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic)
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Other

12 pages, 2332 KiB  
Systematic Review
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Triggers Atrial Conduction Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Dimitrios V. Moysidis, Andreas S. Papazoglou, Christos Tsagkaris, Vasileios Oikonomou, Anna Loudovikou, Anastasios Kartas, Nikolaos Stalikas, Efstratios Karagiannidis, Mihnea-Alexandru Găman, Marios Papadakis, Chrysi Christodoulaki and Periklis Panagopoulos
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(7), 802-813; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12070059 - 13 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1792
Abstract
Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is closely related to various adverse cardiovascular manifestations and increased cardiovascular risk. However, atrial fibrillation (AF) development and atrial conduction abnormalities have not been thoroughly studied in patients with PCOS. Methods: This meta-analysis (CRD42021261375) was conducted in accordance [...] Read more.
Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is closely related to various adverse cardiovascular manifestations and increased cardiovascular risk. However, atrial fibrillation (AF) development and atrial conduction abnormalities have not been thoroughly studied in patients with PCOS. Methods: This meta-analysis (CRD42021261375) was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Our aim was to investigate associations between PCOS and disorders in atrial conduction parameters linked with an increased risk for AF occurrence. Results: Five cohort studies with aggregate data on 406 adult women (229 with PCOS and 177 age-matched without PCOS) were included in this analysis. Our results showed a significantly increased mean difference in P-wave maximum duration (+7.63 ± 7.07 msec; p < 0.01) and P-wave dispersion (+11.42 ± 5.22 msec; p = 0.03) of patients with PCOS compared to healthy women. The mean difference in P-wave minimum duration (−2.22 ± 2.68 msec; p = 0.11) did not reach the statistical threshold between the compared groups. Echocardiographic measurements of atrial electromechanical delay (AED) also indicated a statistically significant mean difference in favour of the PCOS group in all assessed parameters, except for atrial electromechanical coupling (PA) in the tricuspid annulus. Particularly, PCOS was associated with increased lateral PA, septal PA, inter- and intra-AED durations (mean difference: +17.31 ± 9.02 msec; p < 0.01, +11.63 ± 7.42 msec; p < 0.01, +15.31 ± 9.18 msec; p < 0.01, +9.31 ± 6.85 msec; p < 0.01, respectively). Conclusions: PCOS is strongly associated with alterations in several electrocardiographic and echocardiographic parameters indicating abnormal atrial conduction. Therefore, PCOS could be considered as a causal or triggering factor of AF. Larger studies are needed to confirm these results and investigate direct associations between PCOS and AF. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Sciences before, during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic)
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7 pages, 2695 KiB  
Brief Report
High-Fidelity Simulation-Based Education: Description of an Original Crisis Resource Management and Sedation Learning for Dental Surgeons
by Issam Tanoubi, Roger Perron, Marie-Ève Bélanger, Mihai Georgescu, Arnaud Robitaille and Pierre Drolet
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(2), 91-97; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12020008 - 24 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2935
Abstract
Dental surgery includes invasive procedures performed under sedation or monitored anesthesia care (MAC). It is associated with respiratory risks, resulting in death or neurological sequelae without prompt and appropriate management. Management of airway complications also implies mastering crisis resource management (CRM) principles, essentially [...] Read more.
Dental surgery includes invasive procedures performed under sedation or monitored anesthesia care (MAC). It is associated with respiratory risks, resulting in death or neurological sequelae without prompt and appropriate management. Management of airway complications also implies mastering crisis resource management (CRM) principles, essentially non-technical skills to improve patient safety. In response to the need to enhance patient safety and to securely perform surgical procedures outside the operating room due to reduced surgical activity during the worldwide spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, we realized, in our simulation center, a course based on high fidelity simulation to teach procedural sedation and management of related complications. The simulation center accredited this educational program as a continuing professional development formation. The course includes technical skills practice, theoretical presentation, and mastering non-technical skills related to CRM principles. This brief report describes a relatively innovative teaching technique in dentistry, highlights its interest, and reports the subjective opinion of learners as to the pedagogical and professional impact of this training. A learner’s satisfaction survey supports the utility of our sedation and CRM programs. A high degree of satisfaction and perceived value reflect robust learners’ engagement. All medical specialties should encourage high-fidelity simulation continuing professional development courses that incorporate technical skills and crisis management principles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Sciences before, during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic)
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