Advances in the Study of Coping, Emotional Regulation, Prosocial Behavior, and Other Indicators of Psychological Well-Being

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 33554

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Prosocial behaviors are closely related to other skills and behaviors, such as coping strategies. The use of productive and effective coping strategies when faced with issues such as school coexistence and deteriorating interpersonal relationships, which are currently occurring at a high rate in educational centers, is associated with more favorable results such as socio-emotional adaptation, a greater degree of overall/general adaptation, empathy, prosocial behavior, and psychological well-being.

The relationship between personal psychological factors such as well-being, prosociality, the emotional dimension (either in its positive aspects, such as empathy and emotional regulation, or in its negative aspects, such as depression and anxiety), and the use of coping strategies must be addressed. Coping strategies, emotional regulation, and prosocial behavior are relevant variables for the design of psychoeducational intervention programs that promote effective coping strategies education in different contexts for adequate emotional adjustment, as well as to avoid aggression and violence. Research has also demonstrated the importance of prosocial behavior and the practical use of coping strategies in terms of promoting academic achievement.

This Special Issue invites you to submit empirical research or review articles on emotion-focused coping and its relationship with prosocial behavior, quality of life, and psychological well-being at different developmental stages. Articles that more generally address coping with daily stress, emotional regulation, education and promotion of empathy, and the development of prosocial behavior and solidarity actions in different educational, social, professional, and health-related contexts, are also encouraged.

Dr. Francisco Manuel Morales Rodríguez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coping
  • emotional regulation
  • program intervention
  • prosocial behavior
  • well-being
  • empathy
  • solidarity

Published Papers (16 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 568 KiB  
Article
The Perth Empathy Scale: Psychometric Properties of the Polish Version and Its Mental Health Correlates
by Paweł Larionow and David A. Preece
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(11), 2615-2629; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13110182 - 10 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1613
Abstract
The Perth Empathy Scale (PES) is a 20-item self-report questionnaire that assesses people’s ability to recognize emotions in others (i.e., cognitive empathy) and vicariously experience other’s emotions (i.e., affective empathy), across positive and negative emotions. Originally developed in English, the aim of our [...] Read more.
The Perth Empathy Scale (PES) is a 20-item self-report questionnaire that assesses people’s ability to recognize emotions in others (i.e., cognitive empathy) and vicariously experience other’s emotions (i.e., affective empathy), across positive and negative emotions. Originally developed in English, the aim of our study was to introduce the first Polish version of the PES and test its psychometric performance. Our sample was 318 people (184 females, 134 males) with ages ranging from 18 to 77. The factor structure was verified with confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was tested in terms of internal consistency and test–retest reliability. To explore convergent, divergent, and discriminant validity, we examined relationships between the PES and measures of depression, anxiety, and emotional intelligence. It was shown that the scale was characterized by the intended four-factor solution, thus supporting factorial validity. The internal consistency reliability was also good and test–retest reliability was moderate. The convergent, divergent, and discriminant validity were strong. The clinical importance of assessing affective empathy across both positive and negative emotions was supported. Overall, our results therefore suggest that the Polish version of the PES has strong psychometric performance and clinical relevance as a measure of the multidimensional empathy construct. Full article
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29 pages, 1531 KiB  
Article
The Association between Nonsuicidal Self-Injury and Perfectionism in Adolescence: The Role of Mental Disorders
by Dora Gyori, Bernadett Frida Farkas, Daniel Komaromy, Lili Olga Horvath, Nora Kollarovics, Peter Garas and Judit Balazs
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(11), 2299-2327; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13110163 - 24 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1200
Abstract
Previous evidence has drawn attention to the fact that maladaptive perfectionism is a risk factor for engagement in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Until now, few studies have examined this topic, especially among community adolescents. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship [...] Read more.
Previous evidence has drawn attention to the fact that maladaptive perfectionism is a risk factor for engagement in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Until now, few studies have examined this topic, especially among community adolescents. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between perfectionism dimensions and NSSI functions to examine the potential mediating effect of mental disorders. Altogether, 146 Hungarian community adolescents (ages 13–18 years) were involved. All participants completed the Hungarian adaptation of the Inventory of Statements about Self-Injury (ISAS), the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (FMPS), and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Kid. To analyse the interrelationships among NSSI, perfectionism, and mental disorders, we conducted regression and network analysis. Of the 146 adolescents, 90 (61.64%, girls: 71.11%) engaged in NSSI. The Concern over Mistakes and Doubts about Action scales of the FMPS significantly and positively predicted both NSSI intrapersonal and interpersonal motivation, with comparable effect sizes, and this association was fully mediated by anxiety disorders. There was a significant direct negative relationship between the FMPS Organisation dimension and both main NSSI functions. This study draws attention to an increasing trend and the extremely high NSSI prevalence rate among community adolescents. Adolescents with perfectionistic concerns are at heightened risk for anxiety disorders, which can increase their vulnerability to NSSI engagement. Full article
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13 pages, 497 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Relationship between Prosocial Behavior and Well-Being: Basic Psychological Need as the Mediator
by Linwei Li, Aqeel Khan and Mohd Rustam Mohd Rameli
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(10), 2179-2191; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13100153 - 07 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1682
Abstract
Previous research has established a positive link between prosocial behavior (PB) and psychological well-being. However, limited studies have explored the relationship between PB and well-being (WB), particularly among vocational students. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms, including mediating factors, remain understudied in this context. This [...] Read more.
Previous research has established a positive link between prosocial behavior (PB) and psychological well-being. However, limited studies have explored the relationship between PB and well-being (WB), particularly among vocational students. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms, including mediating factors, remain understudied in this context. This study aimed to investigate the association between PB and WB among vocational students while examining the mediating role of basic psychological needs. A sample of 221 vocational students (mean age = 19.68 years, SD = 1.57) completed anonymous questionnaires assessing PB, basic psychological needs, and WB. The results revealed a positive correlation between PB and WB in vocational students (r = 0.22, p < 0.01), with basic psychological needs partially mediating this relationship (β = 0.14, t = 10.85, p < 0.001, 95% CI = (0.18, 0.23)). These findings enhance our understanding of the association between PB and vocational students’ WB, shed light on the mechanisms involved, and offer insights into promoting the well-being of vocational students. Full article
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25 pages, 5260 KiB  
Article
Emotional Competences of Primary Education Teachers: A Need in School Post COVID-19
by Roberto Sanz-Ponce, Elena López-Luján, Ángela Serrano-Sarmiento and Juan Antonio Giménez-Beut
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(10), 1961-1985; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13100141 - 22 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1133
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the number of students with mental health problems: depression, anxiety, stress. Faced with this reality, teachers and schools must be prepared to respond quickly and effectively. Therefore, the objective of this article is to analyze the emotional competences [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the number of students with mental health problems: depression, anxiety, stress. Faced with this reality, teachers and schools must be prepared to respond quickly and effectively. Therefore, the objective of this article is to analyze the emotional competences of primary school teachers in the city of Valencia based on the following sociodemographic variables: sex, age, professional experience, type of center and whether they have children. For this purpose, a quantitative methodological approach has been followed, through which the emotional competencies of primary education teachers are analyzed. These results allow us to establish teacher profiles according to sociodemographic variables and help to detect possible training deficiencies. A sample of 371 teachers of primary education in the city of Valencia has been analyzed. The Questionnaire on Teaching Competences of Primary Education Teachers, carried out under the Planned Action Model, has been used, and descriptive, univariate, bivariate and cluster analyses have been carried out. The mean, the standard deviation and the interquartile range (IQR) have been analyzed, as well as non-parametric tests such as the Wilcoxon, Kruskal–Wallis or Z test. The most significant results are that teachers have a greater ability to interpret emotions and to listen to students. On the contrary, it is teachers who most reject prejudice, discrimination and racism. Younger teachers are the ones who implement more inclusive learning environments. Finally, in general, all teachers are very respectful of students and claim to know how to manage classroom conflicts. The results obtained, in general terms, coincide with most of the research on teachers’ emotional competencies. Some aspects simply do not coincide with the literature. The teachers who participated in our research perceive themselves as having a greater capacity to observe and interpret students’ emotions, to generate learning situations that cater to diversity and to listen to their students. Other studies place these competencies at lower levels. Full article
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12 pages, 316 KiB  
Article
Testing the Associations between Coping, Mental Health, and Satisfaction with Life in Portuguese Workers
by Filipe Rodrigues, Pedro Morouço and Tiago Santos
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(7), 1245-1256; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13070092 - 11 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1948
Abstract
The present study aimed to explore the relationships between coping strategies, symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress, and satisfaction with life among Portuguese workers. A sample of 402 participants (207 male, 195 female), ranging in age from 18 to 70 years (M = [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to explore the relationships between coping strategies, symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress, and satisfaction with life among Portuguese workers. A sample of 402 participants (207 male, 195 female), ranging in age from 18 to 70 years (M = 32.90, SD = 11.75), was included in the study. Participants reported varying levels of work experience, ranging from 1 to 45 years (M = 10.62, SD = 4.07). The sample encompassed diverse occupations, including arts and design (n = 28), engineering (n = 23), marketing (n = 27), administration (n = 50), transportation and logistics (n = 57), clerks (n = 63), lawyers (n = 21), factory workers (n = 20), accountant and finance (n = 41), journalism (n = 27), health care (n = 29), and others (n = 16). To examine the associations between each determinant and satisfaction with life, hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted. Two models were tested, with predictors entered in blocks based on theoretical and empirical considerations. The second model accounted for 52.4% of the variance in satisfaction with life (F (14, 384) = 3.884, p < 0.001, R2 = 0.27, adjusted R2 = 0.24). Depressive symptoms and stress consistently exhibited a significant association (p < 0.05) with satisfaction with life across all tested models. In terms of coping mechanisms, instrumental support reinterpretation, disengagement, and humor demonstrated a significant association with satisfaction with life (p < 0.05). The findings suggest that employing adaptive coping strategies may help mitigate symptoms of mental distress and enhance satisfaction with life. By understanding the relationships between coping strategies, mental health symptoms, and satisfaction with life, interventions can be developed to promote well-being and improve overall quality of life among Portuguese workers. Full article
16 pages, 318 KiB  
Article
The Effect of STEAM Activities Based on Experiential Learning on Ninth Graders’ Mental Motivation
by Naela Mater, Wajeeh Daher and Fayez Mahamid
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(7), 1229-1244; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13070091 - 10 Jul 2023
Viewed by 2097
Abstract
The impact of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) on pupils’ learning has been increasingly highlighted recently. This study aims to shed light on the effect of STEAM activities based on experiential learning on ninth graders’ mental motivation and learning. The present [...] Read more.
The impact of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) on pupils’ learning has been increasingly highlighted recently. This study aims to shed light on the effect of STEAM activities based on experiential learning on ninth graders’ mental motivation and learning. The present research adopted a mixed methodology (quantitative and qualitative). The study sample consisted of 90 students divided into three groups. The tools utilized in conducting the study included California Measurement Mental Motivation, and semi-structured interviews with (10) participants. The tools’ validity and reliability were verified. After data were analyzed, the findings showed statically significant differences between students’ post average scores regarding mental motivation due to teaching method, and in favor of the experimental groups (face-to-face STEAM activities, online STEAM activities). This provides tangible proof for the need to include STEAM activities in school curricula to enhance learners’ curiosity, problem-solving skills and self-confidence through learning, as well as their task accomplishment ability. Full article
17 pages, 1711 KiB  
Article
Perceived Moral Norms in an Extended Theory of Planned Behavior in Predicting University Students’ Bystander Intentions toward Relational Bullying
by Mareike Brehmer
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(7), 1202-1218; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13070089 - 02 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2194
Abstract
Relational forms of bullying, such as social exclusion, are prevalent among students in higher education (HE) and pose challenges to the creation of a safe and inclusive learning environment for young adults. Based on research showing how bystanders in bullying incidents can counteract [...] Read more.
Relational forms of bullying, such as social exclusion, are prevalent among students in higher education (HE) and pose challenges to the creation of a safe and inclusive learning environment for young adults. Based on research showing how bystanders in bullying incidents can counteract bullying effectively, the present study investigated the extent to which bystanders’ prosocial behavioral intentions may be predicted using an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB). Students’ behavioral intentions toward the physical–social exclusion of peers in a hypothetical group work setting were investigated in a sample of 419 university students in the United Kingdom. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that moral norms significantly predicted intention over and above cognitive attitude, descriptive norms, and perceived behavioral control. In contrast, emotional attitudes and injunctive norms were not significant predictors of intention. Moreover, significant weak mediation effects could be shown for moral norms as a mediator of the relationships between standard TPB predictors and intention. The present study contributes knowledge to the growing research body on applications of the TPB and on bystander intentions in bullying in HE. Implications for a development in preventive measures to foster university students’ prosocial intentions toward bullying are discussed. Full article
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11 pages, 274 KiB  
Article
Depressive, Anxiety, and Stress Symptoms in Parents of Children Being Admitted for Febrile Seizures in a Tertiary Hospital in the East Coast of Malaysia
by Azizah Othman, Salmi Abdul Razak, Ariffin Nasir, Anis Kausar Ghazali and Muhammad Amiro Rasheeq Mohd Radzi
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(6), 1015-1025; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13060077 - 09 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1713
Abstract
Febrile seizures in children are an alarming experience for parents. This study aimed to assess the psychological functioning of parents of children when they were being admitted for treatment of febrile seizures in the hospital, the importance of which is clear, since parents [...] Read more.
Febrile seizures in children are an alarming experience for parents. This study aimed to assess the psychological functioning of parents of children when they were being admitted for treatment of febrile seizures in the hospital, the importance of which is clear, since parents are the primary custodian of their children. This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 110 participants whose child had been admitted for a febrile seizure to Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia from September 2020 until June 2021. The depression, anxiety, and stress levels were determined based on a validated Bahasa Melayu questionnaire of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21). In addition, multiple logistic regression was used to determine the associated factors related to the participants’ psychological functioning. The mean age of children with febrile seizures were 21 months old, and most children showed features of simple febrile seizures (71.8%). The prevalence of anxiety, stress, and depression were 58.2%, 29%, and 23.6%, respectively. Using multiple logistic regression, child age, family history of febrile seizures, family history of epilepsy, and length of stay in the ward were found to be significantly associated with anxiety when adjusted for other variables. Otherwise, for depression and stress, no significant associated variables were found when adjusted for other variables. Anxiety was highly reported by participants when their children were admitted for febrile seizures. Several factors impacted their anxiety, including the lower the child’s age was, participants with no family history of febrile seizures before, and the longer duration of hospital stay. Therefore, further study and intervention on reducing the parent’s anxiety could be emphasized in the future. Full article
16 pages, 1606 KiB  
Article
The Effectiveness of a Recreational Behavioural Programme in Reducing Anger among Children with Intellectual Disabilities at the Primary Stage
by Ahmed R. Elsayed and Ahmed K. Hassan
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(6), 948-963; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13060072 - 02 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1168
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the impact of a recreational behavioural programme on reducing the degree of anger among children with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the primary stage. The study was implemented with 24 children who were randomly divided into two groups: an [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the impact of a recreational behavioural programme on reducing the degree of anger among children with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the primary stage. The study was implemented with 24 children who were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental group (n = 12, age = 10.80 ± 1.03 years, IQ = 63.10 ± 4.43 scores, ASW = 55.50 ± 1.51 scores) and a control group (n = 12, age = 10.80 ± 0.92 years, IQ = 63.00 ± 4.16 scores, ASW = 56.00 ± 1.15 scores). We used the PROMIS anger scale with a modification that was used to measure the degree of anger, and the recreational behavioural programme was implemented three times per week for six weeks. The results of the research showed that the improvement percentages for Anger Triggers (AT), Inner Anger (IA), and External Anger (EA) were 9.73%, 9.04%, and 9.60%, respectively, and the Anger scale as a whole (ASW) rate was 9.46%. r = (0.89–0.91). The experimental group using the recreational behavioural programme also outperformed the control group, as the results indicated a decrease in the intensity of anger in the direction of the experimental group. The differences in the improvement percentages for Anger Triggers (AT) Inner Anger (IA), and External Anger (EA) were 32.97%, 31.03%, and 26.63%, respectively, and the Anger scale as a whole (ASW) rate was 30.09%, r = (0.82–0.86). The results of the study confirmed the effectiveness of the recreational activity programme in developing social interaction among children with intellectual disabilities, which indicates the success of the recreational behavioural programme in reducing the degree of anger among children with IDs. Therefore, the recreational behavioural programme had a positive effect in terms of reducing the degree of anger among children with IDs in the primary stage. Full article
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12 pages, 315 KiB  
Article
Antecedents Predicting Students’ Active Use of Learning Strategies in Schools of Low SES Context within the Framework of Self-Determination Theory
by Agne Brandisauskiene, Loreta Buksnyte-Marmiene and Jurate Cesnaviciene
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(3), 568-579; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13030044 - 06 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1778
Abstract
Meeting a student’s autonomy, competence, and relatedness needs is one of the conditions to help him/her learn effectively. In this study, we aim to understand how teacher support (relationship with students, their autonomy support) and general classroom atmosphere (equity, relationships between students) predict [...] Read more.
Meeting a student’s autonomy, competence, and relatedness needs is one of the conditions to help him/her learn effectively. In this study, we aim to understand how teacher support (relationship with students, their autonomy support) and general classroom atmosphere (equity, relationships between students) predict students’ learning; that is, the learning strategies they use. Data were collected from 24 secondary schools in 9 municipalities in Lithuania with low SES (socioeconomic status) contexts (N = 632 students; 330 girls and 302 boys). The following instruments were used in the research: What Is Happening in this Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire, a short form of the Learning Climate Questionnaire (LCQ), and the Learning Strategies scale. The results showed that girls use learning strategies statistically significantly more actively than boys. Students’ use of learning strategies in a sample of both boys and girls are predicted by perceived teacher support, student cohesiveness, and perceived autonomy support. Therefore, responding to the relatedness and autonomy needs of students from low SES is very significant because it can increase their engagement in the learning process. The difference found, that equity is a significant predictor of learning strategies in the sample of girls, but not in boys, encourages further research and interpretation of such research results. Full article
15 pages, 1545 KiB  
Article
The Role of Emotional Intelligence and Metacognition in Teachers’ Stress during Pandemic Remote Working: A Moderated Mediation Model
by Calogero Iacolino, Brenda Cervellione, Rachele Isgrò, Ester Maria Concetta Lombardo, Giuseppina Ferracane, Massimiliano Barattucci and Tiziana Ramaci
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(1), 81-95; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13010006 - 03 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3436
Abstract
During the COVID-19 pandemic, in adapting to social and work changes and new technological methods for remote teaching, teachers were subjected to increased work pressure, which affected their well-being and led to increased negative stress and burnout. This study was designed to test [...] Read more.
During the COVID-19 pandemic, in adapting to social and work changes and new technological methods for remote teaching, teachers were subjected to increased work pressure, which affected their well-being and led to increased negative stress and burnout. This study was designed to test whether dysfunctional outcomes resulting from adapting to new ways of teaching via technological tools can be mitigated by the protective factors of emotional intelligence and metacognition. The study involved 604 teachers in Sicily filling out a questionnaire consisting of four different scales: (1) the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SREIT); (2) the Metacognitive Functions Screening Scale (MFSS-30); (3) the Link Burnout Questionnaire (LBQ); and (4) the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale STSS-I. The results show that emotional intelligence mediates the relationship between certain remote work risk factors, as well as stress and burnout. In addition, metacognition was found to be a significant moderating factor in the relationship between risk factors and emotional intelligence. With regard to the United Nations’ Agenda 2030 Goals, our results emphasize the importance of teachers’ emotional and metacognitive skills in promoting quality of life and psychological well-being. Full article
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10 pages, 527 KiB  
Article
The Volunteer Satisfaction Survey (VSS): Adaptation and Psychometric Properties among Portuguese Volunteers
by Cátia Martins, Saúl Neves de Jesus, José Tomás da Silva, Conceição Ribeiro, Cristina Nunes, Francisca Ferreira Cunha and Beatriz Marcelo
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(1), 23-32; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13010002 - 30 Dec 2022
Viewed by 2150
Abstract
(1) Background: Volunteering satisfaction is one significant construct that nourishes the sustaining of volunteer work, and it is present in reference models such as the three-stage volunteer process model (VPM). The volunteer satisfaction survey (VSS), created by Vecina, Chacón and Sueiro, evaluates three [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Volunteering satisfaction is one significant construct that nourishes the sustaining of volunteer work, and it is present in reference models such as the three-stage volunteer process model (VPM). The volunteer satisfaction survey (VSS), created by Vecina, Chacón and Sueiro, evaluates three different domains of volunteer satisfaction: specific motivations, organization management and volunteering tasks. The aim of this study was to adapt the instrument and explore the psychometric properties of the 17 items of the VSS in a sample of Portuguese volunteers. (2) Methods: The sample was composed of 335 Portuguese volunteers (aged between 14 and 81 years), mainly women (76.4%). Measures included volunteer satisfaction, work engagement and organizational commitment. (3) Results: The original three-factor model was tested with a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and the model fitted the data. Satisfactory levels of internal consistency, discriminant and convergent validity were found. (4) Conclusions: The VSS reveals good psychometric properties and can be considered a useful tool for professionals and future research for volunteers’ satisfaction assessment. Full article
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9 pages, 560 KiB  
Article
Relationships between Spirituality, Happiness, and Prosocial Bystander Behavior in Bullying—The Mediating Role of Altruism
by Fernanda Inéz García-Vázquez, Maria Fernanda Durón-Ramos, Rubén Pérez-Rios and Ricardo Ernesto Pérez-Ibarra
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(12), 1833-1841; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12120128 - 06 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2455
Abstract
Positive psychology is vital in increasing prosocial behavior and reducing bullying. However, limited studies have analyzed the influence of positive personal characteristics on the prosocial behaviors of bystanders in bullying. The present study examined direct and indirect relationships between spirituality, happiness, altruism, and [...] Read more.
Positive psychology is vital in increasing prosocial behavior and reducing bullying. However, limited studies have analyzed the influence of positive personal characteristics on the prosocial behaviors of bystanders in bullying. The present study examined direct and indirect relationships between spirituality, happiness, altruism, and prosocial bystander behavior in bullying. Participants in this study were 685 students from Northwestern Mexico; 51% were male and 49% female, between 12 and 18 years old (M = 14.3 years, SD = 1.68). A structural equation model (SEM) was calculated. The results indicate that happiness and altruism were related to prosocial bystander behavior. Spirituality and happiness have an indirect relationship by increasing prosocial bystander behavior through the positive effects of altruism. The SEM explained 48% of the variance of the prosocial bystander. The implications for improving defensive behavior in bullying and reducing school violence are discussed. Full article
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18 pages, 2140 KiB  
Article
Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Mental Health and Lifestyle in Thai Occupational Therapy Students: A Mixed Method Study
by Tiam Srikhamjak, Kanyarak Yanawuth, Kornkamon Sucharittham, Chitsanucha Larprabang, Patcharaporn Wangsattabongkot, Tanyathorn Hauwadhanasuk, Chirathip Thawisuk, Peeradech Thichanpiang and Anuchart Kaunnil
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(11), 1682-1699; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12110118 - 18 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2433
Abstract
The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have led to global reports of hazards to mental health. However, reports regarding lifestyle changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic are lacking. Using a convergent mixed methods design, we conducted individual interviews with twelve occupational therapy students [...] Read more.
The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have led to global reports of hazards to mental health. However, reports regarding lifestyle changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic are lacking. Using a convergent mixed methods design, we conducted individual interviews with twelve occupational therapy students and interpreted the results by content analysis. We completed a survey of Thai Sensory Patterns Assessment (TSPA) concerning perspectives from occupational therapy students (n = 99). They identified two major themes: (i) adaptive responses were consistent with areas of occupation during the COVID-19 pandemic; (ii) multidimensional challenges were related to sensory patterns of purposeful and meaningful activities. The participants reported both positive and negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on their lives. It had both positive and negative effects on the lifestyle of students affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The positive effect was that most students learned better ways to protect and care for themselves. During the COVID-19 pandemic, occupational therapy students were most concerned about their online learning activities, economic problems, isolation from society, and lifestyle. The negative effects of this include stress, anxiety, loneliness, frustration, boredom, and exhaustion for occupational therapy students. As an impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, occupational therapy students adapted to new lifestyles and experienced mental health issues related to their studies, families, friends, economics, social climate, and future job opportunities. Educators may use the findings of this study to prevent negative impacts on mental health and promote academic achievement in the future, as well as general well-being, efficacy, and empowerment of students in the new normal post-COVID-19 pandemic era. Full article
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13 pages, 886 KiB  
Article
Serial Mediation Model of Social Capital Effects over Academic Stress in University Students
by Mario Eduardo Castro Torres, Pablo Marcelo Vargas-Piérola, Carlos F. Pinto and Rubén Alvarado
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(11), 1644-1656; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12110115 - 16 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2940
Abstract
Background: Although several studies have shown that social capital and social support decreases academic stress (AS), there has been lack of atheoretical model to explain how this occurs. This study aims to verify a model that explains the effect of bonding social capital [...] Read more.
Background: Although several studies have shown that social capital and social support decreases academic stress (AS), there has been lack of atheoretical model to explain how this occurs. This study aims to verify a model that explains the effect of bonding social capital (BSC) over academic stress psychological symptoms (PsyS), considering the multiple sequential mediation of socio-emotional support (SES), self-efficacy (sEffic) and self-esteem (sEstee). Methods: In a transversal study, 150 undergraduate volunteer students were recruited using non-probabilistic purposive sampling. Data were collected using psychological questionnaires and were processed through partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). Results: Goodness of fit of the models (SRMR = 0.056, 0.057, <HI95) (dULS, dG < HI95), reliability and validity are adequate. The indirect effect of BSC over PsyS (β = −0.196; IC 95% [−0.297, −0.098]) is relevant and significant and is serial mediated by SES and sEffic. Conclusions: From a very precise conceptual definition, a model is generated, within which empirical evidence explains the relationship between BSC and PsyS, emphasizing the role of BSC in the development of personal resources to cope with AS. This can be applied to policies and public health programs that affect these variables. Full article
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Review
The Effect of Digital Mindfulness Interventions on Depressive, Anxiety, and Stress Symptoms in Pregnant Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Monique L. Mefrouche, Eva-Maria Siegmann, Stephanie Böhme, Matthias Berking and Johannes Kornhuber
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(9), 1694-1706; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13090122 - 01 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1579
Abstract
Introduction. Pregnancy is a unique time in a woman’s life that can be both exciting and challenging. It is also a period that can be associated with significant stress, anxiety, and depression, which can have negative consequences for both the mother and [...] Read more.
Introduction. Pregnancy is a unique time in a woman’s life that can be both exciting and challenging. It is also a period that can be associated with significant stress, anxiety, and depression, which can have negative consequences for both the mother and the baby. Mindfulness interventions are known to be a well-suited treatment and prevention method for psychiatric symptoms in pregnancy, and web-based applications have been explored. We here present an up-to-date systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized–controlled trials to investigate the effect of digital-based mindfulness interventions on depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms during pregnancy. Methods. The systematic literature search and data extraction was performed by two independent raters. It resulted in 13 eligible studies overall comprising 1373 participants. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses for depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms after completion of a digital mindfulness intervention (compared to a control group). Results. Digital mindfulness intervention methods were significantly able to reduce depression (g = −0.47, 95% CI [−0.9; −0.09]) and anxiety symptoms (g = −0.41, 95% CI [−0.77; −0.05]), but not stress symptoms. These effects were moderated by the attrition rate (βDepression = 0.025, pDepression < 0.01; βAnxiety = 0.022, pAnxiety < 0.01; βStress = 0.022, pStress < 0.01). Primiparity also had a significant influence on the intervention effect regarding depression symptoms (β = 0.033, p = 0.024). Conclusions. Digital mindfulness interventions are a promising method to reduce mental health symptoms in pregnant women. We identified certain parameters moderating this effect, for example, primiparity and the attrition rate. Full article
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