Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 24294

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Promoting a Healthy Society (PHeSo) Research Group, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: global health; physical and sports activities as a strategy to promote a healthy society; physical activity interventions; exercise training physical exercise; physical health; assessment of physical capacity; health, quality of life in groups of subjects and active lifestyle (elderly; children, type 2 diabetes, Parkinson, etc.); balance and muscle strength; rehabilitation; osteoporosis; fall prevention; validity and reliability of physical fitness testing; active tourism; outdoor behavioral healthcare; wilderness therapy; forest bathing; shinrin-yoku; Buddhist walking
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sports Science, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: sport science; global health; physical education; physical activity; physical fitness; physical performance; physical exercise training; physical capacity assessment; health, quality of life and active lifestyle (children, adolescents, adults)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Promoting a Healthy Society (PHeSo) Research Group, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: education sciences; physical education; special educational needs; educational psychology; global health; physical health; physical activity interventions; physical exercise training; assessment of physical capacity; health, quality of life and active lifestyle; balance and muscle strength; fall prevention; validity and reliability of physical fitness testing; active ageing; adherence to physical activity; outdoor behavioral healthcare; active tourism; physical activities in nature
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Research Group on Physical and Health Literacy and Health-Related Quality of Life (PHYQOL), Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, 10003 Caceres, Spain
2. Departamento de Desporto e Saúde, Escola de Saúde e Desenvolvimento Humano, Universidade de Évora, 16 7004-516 Évora, Portugal
Interests: fitness; sport; adolescent; children; physical condition; obesity; health; well-being; physical literacy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The importance of physical education and physical activity is unquestionable. They positively influence the functioning of the body, providing multiple benefits at therapeutic and preventive levels. It is therefore important to promote healthy lifestyles for optimal human health.

Following the success of the previous edition, this Special Issue aims to disseminate national and/or international research studies on the topics of physical education, physical activity and human health. We aim to highlight the relevance of these studies in addressing various issues and contribute to a better understanding of these topics.

We welcome submissions on the above topics in the form of: reliability studies, validity studies, correlational studies, observational studies, study protocols, longitudinal studies, cross-sectional studies, case reports, qualitative studies, studies with discourse analysis, bibliometric reviews, narrative reviews, scoping reviews, systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Topics of interest include:

  • Physical education;
  • Physical activity;
  • Human health;
  • Exercise or sport and health;
  • Welfare;
  • Healthy habits;
  • Gender and sport;
  • The political economy of sport;
  • Sport;
  • Corporal expression;
  • Inclusive and adapted sport;
  • Physical literacy;
  • Fitness tests.

Dr. José Carmelo Adsuar
Dr. Roxana Paola Palacios Cartagena
Dr. Carmen Galán Arroyo
Dr. María Mendoza Muñoz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health
  • physical activity
  • exercise
  • culture
  • sports performance
  • sports training
  • health promotion
  • health
  • inclusion
  • health-related quality of life
  • obesity

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 594 KiB  
Article
Is Frequency of Practice of Different Types of Physical Activity Associated with Health and a Healthy Lifestyle at Different Ages?
by Liudmila Liutsko, Sergey Leonov, Alexander Pashenko and Irina Polikanova
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2024, 14(1), 256-271; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe14010017 - 22 Jan 2024
Viewed by 665
Abstract
Physical activity (PA) has been shown to be related to physical and mental health. Yet there are few studies on how the frequency of PA relates to health and a healthy lifestyle. We aimed to investigate how the frequency of different PAs is [...] Read more.
Physical activity (PA) has been shown to be related to physical and mental health. Yet there are few studies on how the frequency of PA relates to health and a healthy lifestyle. We aimed to investigate how the frequency of different PAs is associated with the following health indicators: body mass index (BMI), substance consumption, physical health, and mental health. We focused on three types of PA: (1) medium- to high-intensity aerobic exercise; (2) low- to medium-intensity relaxing exercise; and (3) outdoor leisure PA. A total of 9617 volunteers, aged 19 to 81, participated in the study. The relationships between the frequencies of the three types of PA and health-related and sociodemographic factors were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression. We found that women more frequently engaged in PA type 2, and men in types 1 and 3. A higher frequency of PA was associated with lower BMI and less or no smoking behavior; higher education (PAs 1 and 3); higher age (PAs 2 and 3); better physical health (PAs 1 and 3); and better mental health (PA 3). In conclusion, higher frequency of different PAs was significantly associated with better physical and mental health, less smoking, higher age, and a higher level of education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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15 pages, 1902 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Wearing Different Face Masks on Vigorous Physical Exercise Performance and Perceived Exertion among COVID-19 Infected vs. Uninfected Female Students
by Nourhen Mezghani, Achraf Ammar, Omar Boukhris, Liwa Masmoudi, Mohamed Ali Boujelbane, Rayda Ben Ayed, Turki Mohsen Alzahrani, Atyh Hadadi, Rihab Abid, Ibrahim Ouergui, Jordan M. Glenn, Khaled Trabelsi and Hamdi Chtourou
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(11), 2709-2723; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13110187 - 15 Nov 2023
Viewed by 978
Abstract
Under certain circumstances, masks are an effective and immediate solution to reduce the spread of viral infection. However, the impact of masks on the ability to perform vigorous exercise remains an area of concern. Primarily, this impact has been explored in healthy subjects, [...] Read more.
Under certain circumstances, masks are an effective and immediate solution to reduce the spread of viral infection. However, the impact of masks on the ability to perform vigorous exercise remains an area of concern. Primarily, this impact has been explored in healthy subjects, yielding contradictory findings, and little is known of it among COVID-19-infected individuals. This study examined the effects of surgical masks, N-95 masks, and unmasked conditions on the performance and perceived exertion (RPE) of infected vs. non-infected young women during high-intensity, repeated sprint exercise (5mSRT). Following a familiarization session, eighty-three (42 COVID-19-previously infected (PIG) and 43 non-infected (NIG)), female participants (age 20.02 ± 1.05 years, BMI 21.07 ± 2.1 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to one of three mask conditions: unmasked, surgical mask, or N95 mask. All participants attended three test sessions (i.e., one session for each mask condition) at least one week apart. At the beginning of each test session, data related to participants’ physical activity (PA) and sleep behaviours during the previous week were collected. In each test session, participants performed the 5mSRT, during which performance indicators (best distance (BD), total distance (TD), fatigue index (FI) and percentage decrement (PD)) were collected, along with RPE. ANOVA indicated no significant main effects of Groups and Masks, and no significant interaction for Groups × Masks for BD, FI, PD, RPE and most sleep and PA behaviours (p > 0.05). For TD, the Groups × Mask interaction was significant (p = 0.031 and ƞp2 = 0.042). Posthoc analysis revealed, in the unmasked condition, there was no difference in TD between PIG and NIG (p > 0.05). However, when wearing a surgical mask, PIG covered lower TD compared to NIG (p < 0.05). Additionally, different types of masks did not affect TD in NIG, while PIG performed the worst using the surgical mask (p < 0.05). These results suggest post-COVID-19 individuals can maintain physical fitness through regular exercise (i.e., sport science curricula) in unmasked conditions, but not when wearing a surgical mask. Furthermore, the impact of different types of face masks on physical performance seems to be minimal, particularly in uninfected populations; future research is warranted to further explore this impact in post-COVID conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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19 pages, 1770 KiB  
Article
Ramadan Fasting and Short-Term Maximal Physical Performance: Searching for Optimal Timing of the Last Meal “Suhoor” in Female Pre-University Handball Players
by Houda Bougrine, Atef Salem, Nidhal Nasser, Achraf Ammar, Hamdi Chtourou and Nizar Souissi
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(10), 2160-2178; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13100152 - 07 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1306
Abstract
Aiming to identify the ideal suhoor timing for maintaining optimal physical performance and health indicators during Ramadan intermittent fasting, the present study compares the effects of early vs. late Suhoor on short-term high-intensity physical exercise while controlling the body mass index (BMI) oral [...] Read more.
Aiming to identify the ideal suhoor timing for maintaining optimal physical performance and health indicators during Ramadan intermittent fasting, the present study compares the effects of early vs. late Suhoor on short-term high-intensity physical exercise while controlling the body mass index (BMI) oral temperature (OT), dietary intake, and sleep patterns. In a randomized design, 19 female pre-university handball players (age: 16.8 ± 0.4 y; height: 1.70 ± 0.9 m; and body mass: 61.5 ± 6.9 kg) underwent two test sessions (at 08:00 a.m. and 05:00 p.m.) at four different conditions: ten days prior to Ramadan (R − 10), the final ten days of Ramadan (R) including both Early Suhoor R(ES) and Late Suhoor R(LS) conditions, and the ten days immediately following Ramadan (R + 10). A recovery period of at least 48 h has been set between successive test sessions at each period. Outcome measures included the Countermovement Jumps Test (CMJ), Modified Agility t-Test (MATT), Repeated Sprint Ability (RSA), and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), OT, BMI, and daily diary intake were assessed across the three periods. The total scores of PSQI decreased significantly during R and R + 10 compared to R − 10. When performed in the afternoon, CMJ, MATT, and RSA performance decreased significantly at R(ES) and R(LS) conditions compared to R − 10. However, these performances decreased only after R(ES) when performed in the morning. Furthermore, performances were lower during R(ES) compared to R(LS) in the afternoon for all tests and the morning for MATT and RSA tests. These findings support prior research showing a deterioration of physical performance during Ramadan fasting and indicate a more pronounced impact following early Suhoor condition. Therefore, consuming a late suhoor, closer to pre-dawn time, could be suggested as an effective strategy to minimize physical performance decline during short-term high-intensity exercise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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21 pages, 391 KiB  
Article
Association of Outdoor Physical Activity and Sports with Life Satisfaction among Women of Reproductive Age According to a European Representative Sample—A Longitudinal Analysis
by Viktória Prémusz, Alexandra Makai, Pongrác Ács, Evelin Derkács and Tamás Laczkó
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(9), 1859-1879; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13090135 - 14 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1057
Abstract
(1) Background: Low life satisfaction (LS) is associated with impaired mental and physical health. Outdoor physical activity (PA) has diverse somatic and psychological benefits. This study aimed to analyse the associations between sports settings and LS in women of reproductive age. (2) Methods: [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Low life satisfaction (LS) is associated with impaired mental and physical health. Outdoor physical activity (PA) has diverse somatic and psychological benefits. This study aimed to analyse the associations between sports settings and LS in women of reproductive age. (2) Methods: Special Eurobarometer on Sport and Physical Activity (2022, 2018, 2013) data on regularity and settings of sports/PA, LS and sociodemographic variables were analysed. The representative sample consisted of 18,489 women (34.60 ± 9.36 years). Pearson χ2 test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were conducted, using IBM SPSS version 28.0 according to the STROBE guidelines. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. (3) There was a significant difference in LS based on sports settings (χ2 = 409.696, p < 0.001). In the outdoor group, a 21.4% higher probability of being “very satisfied” compared to the non-outdoor, 30.0% higher compared to the inactive group, was found (R2N = 0.151). Dividing the sample by age, a significant effect remained in middle adulthood (35–44 years p = 0.002 and 45–49 years p = 0.033). (4) Conclusions: Our results underline the importance of the promotion of outdoor, green exercise and the development of special interventions to maintain or improve the psychological well-being of women in reproductive age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
10 pages, 295 KiB  
Article
“Out-of-Hospital and with Qualified Exercise Professionals”: Keys to the CORTEX-SP Physical Exercise Program According to the Experience of the Participants
by Mikel Tous-Espelosin, Uxue Fernandez-Lasa and Estibaliz Romaratezabala
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(9), 1728-1737; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13090125 - 05 Sep 2023
Viewed by 641
Abstract
Physical exercise programs are useful and necessary for the treatment of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to assess the experiences of participants with schizophrenia in an out-of-hospital exercise program designed and supervised by qualified exercise professionals. Thirty-five individuals with schizophrenia from [...] Read more.
Physical exercise programs are useful and necessary for the treatment of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to assess the experiences of participants with schizophrenia in an out-of-hospital exercise program designed and supervised by qualified exercise professionals. Thirty-five individuals with schizophrenia from the intervention group of the CORTEX-SP study were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and content analysis was performed using inductive coding. Two main categories emerged: the importance of the program being conducted out-of-hospital, and the individuals responsible for the program being qualified exercise professionals. The participants highlighted the importance of conducting the program outside the psychiatric center since it gave them greater satisfaction. They perceived greater seriousness and a greater number of resources and felt encouraged to repeat the program or prolong it. The success of the program, in addition to the space, was due to the personnel in charge of the program, i.e., the qualified exercise professionals, and the fact that the activities were designed and supervised. Participants emphasized the qualifications of the exercise professionals, key for this type of program, their social skills and the level of involvement with participants and their follow-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
11 pages, 314 KiB  
Article
Motivation among Teenage Football Players: A Longitudinal Investigation throughout a Competitive Season
by Filipe Rodrigues, Diogo Monteiro, Rui Matos, Miguel Jacinto, Raúl Antunes and Nuno Amaro
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(9), 1717-1727; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13090124 - 04 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1339
Abstract
The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic changes in behavioral regulations among teenage football players throughout a competitive season, with three measurement points (T1, T2, and T3). The total sample size for the study comprised 108 participants (78 male; 30 female). The [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic changes in behavioral regulations among teenage football players throughout a competitive season, with three measurement points (T1, T2, and T3). The total sample size for the study comprised 108 participants (78 male; 30 female). The participants’ mean age was 14.31 (SD = 1.48). A MANOVA repeated measures analysis was performed within the group for all six behavioral regulations based on self-determination theory. The results of the study revealed noteworthy patterns in the behavioral regulations and intrinsic motivation scores over the competitive season. Identified regulation demonstrated a significant increase from T1 to T3 (p < 0.01, η2p = 0.13). Intrinsic motivation displayed a significant decrease over the same period from T1 to T3 (p < 0.01, η2p = 0.12). On the other hand, amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, and integrated regulation did not show significant changes between the three time points. The findings have practical implications for coaches and sports practitioners, as they highlight the need to create a supportive and autonomy-promoting environment to sustain athletes’ intrinsic motivation throughout a competitive season. Also, recognizing the increase in identified regulation can inform strategies that align team goals and training sessions with players’ individual values, thereby enhancing their commitment and dedication to the team’s success. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
18 pages, 1131 KiB  
Article
Creating Value in Non-Profit Sports Organizations: An Analysis of the DART Model and Its Performance Implications
by Jorge Iván Brand Ortíz, Silvana Janeth Correa Henao, Laura Cristina Henao Colorado and Alejandro Valencia-Arias
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(9), 1676-1693; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13090121 - 01 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 993
Abstract
This study aims to analyze the impact of value creation and cocreation, as measured by the dialogue, access, risk assessment, and transparency (DART) model, on the performance of non-profit sports organizations (NPSOs). To assess this impact, the authors analyzed data collected from sports [...] Read more.
This study aims to analyze the impact of value creation and cocreation, as measured by the dialogue, access, risk assessment, and transparency (DART) model, on the performance of non-profit sports organizations (NPSOs). To assess this impact, the authors analyzed data collected from sports and administration managers of NPSOs, specifically Colombian amateur soccer clubs. The study used partial-least-squares structural-equation modeling (PLS-SEM) with constructs of the reflexive-formative type. The results indicate that value creation has a positive impact on the performance of NPSOs through the mediating effect of value cocreation. Despite the limitations of this study, including the limited research on the relationship between value creation and cocreation and NPSO performance in Colombia, the findings contribute to the understanding of the mediating effect of cocreation. The authors found that cocreation mainly affects the sport, customers/members, communication and image, finance, and organization dimensions of NPSOs in developing countries. This study draws attention to the potential benefits of cocreation for NPSOs and emphasizes the importance of creating value in this context. The study concludes that further studies on the constructs proposed in this research would help to understand the phenomenon of innovation and its impact on NPSOs. Overall, this study provides valuable insights for managers and policymakers in NPSOs—especially in developing countries—on the importance of value cocreation in improving their performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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10 pages, 1476 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Asymmetry of Muscle Activation and Strength in Paralympic Powerlifting Athletes
by Leonardo dos Santos, Felipe J. Aidar, Rafael Luiz Mesquita Souza, Dihogo Gama de Matos, Stefania Cataldi, Gianpiero Greco, Márcio Getirana-Mota, Anderson Carlos Marçal, Lucio Marques Vieira Souza, Jymmys Lopes dos Santos, Paulo Francisco de Almeida-Neto, Breno Guilherme de Araújo Tinoco Cabral, Georgian Badicu, Hadi Nobari and Raphael Frabrício de Souza
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(9), 1645-1654; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13090119 - 01 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 969
Abstract
Background: Strength training is a complex task, as it requires a combination of many variables. In paralympic powerlifting (PP) asymmetries for the evaluation of activation, and static force indicators have been increasingly studied. Objective: To investigate the asymmetries in the strength and muscle [...] Read more.
Background: Strength training is a complex task, as it requires a combination of many variables. In paralympic powerlifting (PP) asymmetries for the evaluation of activation, and static force indicators have been increasingly studied. Objective: To investigate the asymmetries in the strength and muscle activation indicators, before and after a training session of PP athletes. Methodology: Twelve elite athletes from the PP participated in the study, and asymmetry was evaluated through surface electromyography (sEMG) and static strength indicators. Evaluations were made before and after a protocol of five series of five repetitions (5 × 5), with 80% of 1-Maximum Repetition (1RM). Results: In the pectoral muscles, there were differences in the non-dominant limbs between the before and after in the sEMG. There were differences in the pectoralis muscle in the non-dominant limb between moments before (110.75 ± 59.52%) and after (130.53 ± 98.48%, p < 0.001), and there was no difference in triceps activation. In the Maximum Isometric Strength (MIF), there was a difference in the non-dominant limb between before (710.36 ± 129.36) and after (620.27 ± 69.73; p < 0.030). There was a difference before in the dominant (626.89 ± 120.16; 95% CI 550.55–703.24) and non-dominant (710.36 ± 129.36; p = 0.011) limbs. There was no difference in time to MIF. Conclusion: PP athletes showed small levels of asymmetry before and after training, and adaptation to training tends to promote fewer asymmetries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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21 pages, 11316 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Core Complex Training on Some Basketball-Related Aspects of Physical Strength and Shooting Performance
by Ahmed K. Hassan, Abdulmalek K. Bursais, Mohammed S. Alibrahim, Hossam S. Selim, Ahmed M. Abdelwahab and Badry E. Hammad
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(9), 1624-1644; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13090118 - 28 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1411
Abstract
Exercises for the core can be categorized as promoting core-stability, core-strength, or functionality, as these are crucial aspects of most sports activities. This study aimed to examine the effects of using core complex training (CCT), complex training (CT), and core exercise (CE) on [...] Read more.
Exercises for the core can be categorized as promoting core-stability, core-strength, or functionality, as these are crucial aspects of most sports activities. This study aimed to examine the effects of using core complex training (CCT), complex training (CT), and core exercise (CE) on some aspects of muscle strength and shooting performance in basketball players. The 36 participants were divided into three groups of 12 each, and then the experimental approach was applied to each group. The groups were labeled as follows: the core complex training group (N = 12; age, 18.58 ± 0.67 years; height, 178.08 ± 0.79 cm; weight, 76.42 ± 1.38 kg; training age, 7.42 ± 0.51 years); the complex training group (N = 12; age, 18.50 ± 0.52 years; height, 177.92 ± 1.31 cm; weight, 76.67 ± 1.78 kg; training age, 7.33 ± 0.49 years); and the core exercise group (n = 12; age, 18.42 ± 0.52 years; height, 177.75 ± 1.29 cm; weight, 76.58 ± 1.38 kg; training age, 7.42 ± 0.67 years). For ten weeks, each of the three groups participated in three training sessions every week. This study investigates the impact of core complex training on basketball shooting ability and muscle strength. The eight-week program, consisting of weight training, plyometric exercises, and core exercises, yielded improvements in muscle strength and shooting accuracy. In tests of muscular strength and basketball shooting ability, the CCT group outperformed the CE and CT groups. The F value varied from 3.75 to 58.77, which are function values with a p < 0.05 significance level. The core complex training group exhibited superior muscle strength to that of both the complex training group and the core exercise group, in some areas. This is shown in the results of the javelin quadrathlon medicine ball test, the core muscle strength and stability test, the sit-up abdomen test, the sit-up back test, the standing long jump test, the Sargent jump test, and the shooting test (p < 0.005). Due to the effect of the core complex training program on improving performance efficiency and muscle strength, which affects the results of matches, we have recommended using the proven basic strength training program at other age stages, with the objective of including the concept, importance, and design of compound basic strength training in training programs used by basketball coaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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12 pages, 1200 KiB  
Article
Decoding Hip Muscle Activation: A Comparative Electromyographic Analysis of Turn-Out Bent Knee Pulse and Single-Leg Banded Glute Bridge Exercises in Healthy Female Subjects
by Qais Gasibat, Cristina Ioana Alexe, Gabriela Raveica, Dragoș Ioan Tohănean, Koronas Vasilios and Dan Iulian Alexe
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(9), 1612-1623; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13090117 - 26 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1753
Abstract
Individuals with lower extremity injuries and back pain may exhibit weakness and stiffness in important muscles such as the gluteus maximus and external hip rotators. To aid clinicians in understanding the impact of exercises on factors like stability, endurance, and strength, electromyography (EMG) [...] Read more.
Individuals with lower extremity injuries and back pain may exhibit weakness and stiffness in important muscles such as the gluteus maximus and external hip rotators. To aid clinicians in understanding the impact of exercises on factors like stability, endurance, and strength, electromyography (EMG) examination can be employed to monitor muscle activation. In this investigation, the EMG activity of the gluteus maximus and medius were compared between two exercises: the turn-out bent knee pulse and the single-leg banded glute bridge. The study enrolled a group of 64 healthy young women, aged 19 to 24 years. The raw data collected were standardized and represented as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC). To assess the reliability of the EMG recordings, the test–retest analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC3,1). Statistical analysis involved conducting a one-way ANOVA to compare the EMG amplitudes between the two exercises. Remarkably, the results demonstrated a significantly higher EMG signal amplitude during the single-leg banded glute bridge exercise (mean ± SD: 90 ± 28% MVIC) when compared to the turn-out bent knee pulse exercise (mean ± SD: 70 ± 15% MVIC) (F = 16.584, p = 0.001). The study found that the single-leg banded glute bridge exercise had a significantly higher EMG signal amplitude compared to the turn-out bent knee pulse exercise. This suggests that the single-leg banded glute bridge exercise may be more effective in strengthening the gluteus maximus and medius muscles. Overall, this study highlights the importance of targeted muscle training in rehabilitation protocols and the use of EMG examination to monitor muscle activation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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14 pages, 1242 KiB  
Article
Testing the Psychometric Properties of an Arabic Version of the Brunel Mood Scale among Physical Education Students
by Hajer Sahli, Faten Sahli, Mouna Saidane, Mahmoud Rebhi, Noomen Guelmami, Khaled Trabelsi, Haitham Jahrami, Achraf Ammar, Peter C. Terry and Makram Zghibi
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(8), 1539-1552; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13080112 - 18 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1329
Abstract
In our study, we translated and tested the psychometric properties of an Arabic version of the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS), referred to as the Arabic Mood Scale (ARAMS), among physical education university students. A total of 681 participants completed the ARAMS in exploratory [...] Read more.
In our study, we translated and tested the psychometric properties of an Arabic version of the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS), referred to as the Arabic Mood Scale (ARAMS), among physical education university students. A total of 681 participants completed the ARAMS in exploratory and confirmatory phases. Exploratory analyses were conducted on data from 253 students between the ages of 19 and 25 years (M = 21.14 ± 1.65 years) of whom 132 were women (52.2%) and 121 were men (47.8%). Confirmatory analyses were conducted on data from 428 students between the ages of 19 and 25 years (M = 20.93 ± 1.55 years) of whom 203 were women (52.6%) and 225 were men (47.4%). The measurement model of the ARAMS was initially evaluated using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and was subsequently tested via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). EFA identified a 24-item, 6-factor structure that aligned with the original BRUMS measurement model, and CFA demonstrated congruence between the two models. Internal consistency of the six subscales exceeded adequacy levels with good Cronbach’s alpha and McDonald’s Omega values respectively for anger (0.811; 0.812), confusion (0.830; 0.830), depression (0.858; 0.859), fatigue (0.823; 0.825), and tension (0.824; 0.825), and an acceptable value for vigor (0.749; 0.748). Findings support the factorial validity and internal consistency of the ARAMS, which appears to be a suitable measure for use in Arabic physical education contexts. Further validation studies are required before the ARAMS is used in other Arabic-language contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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14 pages, 1149 KiB  
Article
Self-Concept and Self-Esteem, Determinants of Greater Life Satisfaction in Mountain and Climbing Technicians and Athletes
by Laura Martín-Talavera, Óscar Gavín-Chocano, Guillermo Sanz-Junoy and David Molero
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(7), 1188-1201; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13070088 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2379
Abstract
In recent decades, the exponential growth that sports practice in mountain and climbing disciplines have experienced has led to trying to find an explanation for the predisposition of those socio-emotional factors of these athletes that are considered in the search for sensations and [...] Read more.
In recent decades, the exponential growth that sports practice in mountain and climbing disciplines have experienced has led to trying to find an explanation for the predisposition of those socio-emotional factors of these athletes that are considered in the search for sensations and the achievement of greater satisfaction with life. In this study, 4818 people with a sports license in the Spanish Federation of Mountain and Climbing Sports (FEDME) participated; 67.1% were men and 32.9% women. The mean age of the participants was 49.42 years (±11.9), between a range of 18 to 76 years. The following instruments were used: the Self-concept scale (AF5), the Rosenberg Self-esteem Questionnaire and the Life satisfaction scale (SWLS). The objective of this research was to study the enhancing effect of self-esteem between self-concept (physical, emotional and social) and life satisfaction. A reflective model of structural equations (PLS-SEM) was applied based on the proposed theoretical framework from an explanatory–predictive perspective. The results show the self-esteem determination coefficients [(Q2 = 0.141); (R2 = 0.302)] and life satisfaction [(Q2 = 0.243); (R2 = 0.342)] in the estimation of the model, indicating an adequate fit. Mountaineering and climbing sports can be very rewarding, but they can also be challenging and frustrating. Having a good self-concept and good self-esteem allows the athlete to enjoy achieving greater life satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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15 pages, 334 KiB  
Article
Using Psychometric Testing Procedures for Scale Validity, Reliability, and Invariance Analysis: The PRETIE-Q Portuguese Version
by Filipe Rodrigues, Pedro Morouço, Raul Antunes, Diogo Monteiro, Miguel Jacinto, Nuno Figueiredo, Filipe Santos, Vasco Bastos and Diogo Teixeira
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(7), 1158-1172; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13070086 - 23 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1537
Abstract
This study investigated the psychometric nature of preference for and tolerance of exercise intensity in physical activity. It initially re-examined the Preference for and Tolerance of the Intensity of Exercise Questionnaire (PRETIE-Q) among Portuguese exercisers, looking at its applicability to different exercise activities [...] Read more.
This study investigated the psychometric nature of preference for and tolerance of exercise intensity in physical activity. It initially re-examined the Preference for and Tolerance of the Intensity of Exercise Questionnaire (PRETIE-Q) among Portuguese exercisers, looking at its applicability to different exercise activities and exercise experiences. Then, to investigate the applicability of the measure in different groups, its invariance was examined. The sample consisted of 1117 participants (528 male, 589 female) aged 18–81 years old (Mage = 36.81, SD = 11.89). All participants reported at baseline that they were exercising, on average, 3.93 days (SD = 1.36) per week. The exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) displayed the best fit. The ESEM did show invariance when tested for multigroup analysis. The conclusion of this research is that the ESEM demonstrated the best fit, displaying invariance in multigroup analysis. Furthermore, when assessing preference and tolerance in various exercise modalities, the PRETIE-Q should be primarily used as a multidimensional instrument due to the differential recognition of preference and tolerance in seemingly similar physical activity circumstances, highlighting the importance of employing context-verified measures to evaluate exercise-intensity preference and tolerance based on sample characteristics or real-time context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
14 pages, 561 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Cognitively Challenging Physical Activity Games versus Health-Related Fitness Activities on Students’ Executive Functions and Situational Interest in Physical Education: A Group-Randomized Controlled Trial
by Athanasios Kolovelonis and Marios Goudas
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(5), 796-809; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13050060 - 26 Apr 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3397
Abstract
This study compared cognitively challenging physical activity games and health-related fitness activities in terms of their effects on students’ executive functions and situational interest in physical education. A total of 102 fourth- and fifth-grade students (56 boys, 46 girls) participated in this study. [...] Read more.
This study compared cognitively challenging physical activity games and health-related fitness activities in terms of their effects on students’ executive functions and situational interest in physical education. A total of 102 fourth- and fifth-grade students (56 boys, 46 girls) participated in this study. A group-randomized controlled trial design involving an acute experiment was used. Two intact classes of students (one fourth-grade and one fifth-grade) were randomly assigned to each one of the three groups. Students in Group 1 participated in cognitively challenging physical activity games, students in Group 2 participated in activities for developing their health-related fitness, and Group 3 students were the control group without physical education. Executive functions were measured pre- and post-intervention with the design fluency test, whereas situational interest was only measured post-intervention with the situational interest scale. Group 1 students who played cognitively challenging physical activity games had increased their executive functions’ scores more than the Group 2 students involved in health-related fitness activities. Students of both these groups outperformed control group students. Moreover, Group 1 students reported higher levels of instant enjoyment and total interest than Group 2 students. The results of this study suggest that cognitively challenging physical activity games can be an effective means for enhancing executive functions, and motivate students to be involved in interesting and enjoyable forms of physical activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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17 pages, 793 KiB  
Article
The Impact of a Challenge-Based Learning Experience in Physical Education on Students’ Motivation and Engagement
by Luis Simón-Chico, Alba González-Peño, Ernesto Hernández-Cuadrado and Evelia Franco
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(4), 684-700; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13040052 - 26 Mar 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3046
Abstract
The present study investigated how challenge-based learning (CBL) in physical education (PE) may affect students’ basic psychological needs (BPNs), motivational regulations, engagement, and learning in comparison with a traditional teaching (TT) methodology. A quasiexperimental study with experimental and control groups was carried out. [...] Read more.
The present study investigated how challenge-based learning (CBL) in physical education (PE) may affect students’ basic psychological needs (BPNs), motivational regulations, engagement, and learning in comparison with a traditional teaching (TT) methodology. A quasiexperimental study with experimental and control groups was carried out. In total, 50 participants (16 boys and 34 girls) between 13 and 15 years old (Mage = 13.35, SD = 0.62) were involved in the experience for 6 weeks (ncontrol = 24; nexperimental = 26). Validated questionnaires were administered both before and after the intervention in both groups. Furthermore, theoretical knowledge and badminton-specific motor skill tests were carried out in both groups after the intervention. An analysis showed that after the intervention, students in the CBL condition improved their autonomy (Mbefore = 3.15 vs. Mafter = 3.39; ES = 0.26 *), competence (Mbefore = 4.01 vs. Mafter = 4.18; ES = 0.33 *), and relatedness satisfaction (Mbefore = 3.86 vs. Mafter = 4.06; ES = 0.32 *). As for behavioural engagement measures, students in the CBL condition exhibited higher scores after than those from before (Mbefore = 4.12 vs. Mafter = 4.36; ES = 0.35 *). No significant changes were observed for motivational regulations or agentic engagement. On learning outcomes, students in the experimental group achieved higher scores in both theoretical knowledge (Mcontol = 6.48 vs. Mexperimental = 6.79) and badminton-specific motor skills (Mcontol = 6.85 vs. Mexperimental = 7.65) than the control group did. The present study findings highlight that CBL might be a valid and effective methodological approach for students in PE to achieve adaptive motivational, behavioural, and learning outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Physical Activity and Human Health)
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