Trends and Challenges in Higher Education

A topical collection in Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This collection belongs to the section "Higher Education".

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Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Collection Editor
Jefferson College of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA
Interests: higher education; smart hospitals; telemedicine; medical education; simulation;team training; patient safety curriculum design; work based assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Collection Editor
The Graduate School, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
Interests: higher education; curriculum design; work based assessment; access; equity; medical education; team training; disaster medicine; humanitarian health; climate change and health

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the field of education, interest in new methodologies, contexts, and technologies is rising. This Topical Collection intends, in this context, to address new research and trends in all dimensions of the educational process.

It will establish a global platform for the investigation and monitoring of specific challenges concerning education, namely: innovations in learning and pedagogies, digital technologies applied to Education, and new learning contexts.

Original research is requested, and authors are encouraged to contribute to the following topics with research papers: case studies and demonstrations, presenting original scientific observations, methodological aspects, concepts, and instructional technologies.

Specifically, the Topical Collection will be focused on:

  1. Technological Developments in Education: mobile technology, virtual environments, augmented reality, automation and robotics, and other tools for universal learning, focusing on issues that are not addressed by existing research.
  2. Digital Education: mobile learning, eLearning, game-based learning, social media in education, new learning models and technologies, and wearable technologies for education.
  3. Case Studies in Education: empirical studies in higher education regarding digital technologies, new methodologies, new evaluation techniques and tools, perceptions of learning processes efficiency and digital learning best practices.

Prof. Paul Barach
Prof. Dr. Donald A. Donahue
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • higher education
  • secondary education
  • digital education
  • innovations in education
  • new pedagogical methods
  • learning contexts
  • medical education
  • competency assessment
  • simulation
  • engaging learners digitally
  • patient safety – event analysis & learning assessment
  • harnessing the science of learning in the setting of a pandemic
  • work based assessment
  • faculty development

Published Papers (18 papers)

2024

Jump to: 2023, 2022, 2021

18 pages, 942 KiB  
Article
Examining Front-Line Administrative Services in a Selected Public Higher Education Institution
by Mthokozisi Luthuli, Ntando Nkomo and Smangele Moyane
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 422; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14040422 - 17 Apr 2024
Viewed by 152
Abstract
The South African government’s commitment to people-friendly public service since 1994 has influenced the quality of service provided by front-line administrative staff in public higher learning institutions. This study explores the experiences of front-line administrative staff at the Durban University of Technology (DUT), [...] Read more.
The South African government’s commitment to people-friendly public service since 1994 has influenced the quality of service provided by front-line administrative staff in public higher learning institutions. This study explores the experiences of front-line administrative staff at the Durban University of Technology (DUT), focusing on the challenges faced and their impact on teaching, learning, and overall academic activities. Against the backdrop of public higher education institutions (HEIs) in South Africa, the study addresses the persistent challenges in service delivery and the crucial role of front-line administrative staff. Employing a post-positivist paradigm, the research adopts a hybrid methodological approach, combining qualitative and quantitative methods. A survey design is utilized to gather data from first-time entry students (FTENs) enrolled in the Business and Information Management program at DUT, employing convenience sampling and a self-administered questionnaire. The study’s findings illuminate the inefficiencies in front-line administrative services, elucidating their impact on diverse stakeholders and emphasizing the pressing need for enhancement. The study found that the majority of students perceived the services positively, with only a small number expressing dissatisfaction and nearly all participants noted the institution’s adherence to the Batho Pele Principles positively, though a few had contrasting experiences. The findings further revealed areas of improvement for the service. By focusing on the experiences of FTENs, the study contributes to the broader discourse on enhancing service delivery in public higher learning institutions. Addressing these challenges is crucial for the fulfilment of the core mission of HEIs providing quality education and fostering a positive learning environment. Full article
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2023

Jump to: 2024, 2022, 2021

12 pages, 473 KiB  
Article
The Impacts of the COVID-19 Traffic Light System on Staff in Tertiary Education in New Zealand
by Lee-Anne Taylor, Jodee Reid and Anita Jagroop-Dearing
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14010048 - 31 Dec 2023
Viewed by 803
Abstract
The global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic demanded a swift transition in the usual educational mode of delivery from face to face to online. New Zealand established “a traffic light system” after initial COVID-19 lockdowns, and educational delivery adapted accordingly at a tertiary [...] Read more.
The global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic demanded a swift transition in the usual educational mode of delivery from face to face to online. New Zealand established “a traffic light system” after initial COVID-19 lockdowns, and educational delivery adapted accordingly at a tertiary education provider in Te Pūkenga, Eastern Institute of Technology. This study investigates the ramifications of the traffic light system on this institute’s staff, employing semi-structured interviews and an inductive semantic thematic analysis. The findings reveal a universal impact on staff, characterized by an augmented workload attributed to students’ absences and illnesses. This led to increased support demands of staff for their students’ academic progression. Anxiety, stress, and guilt emerged as prevalent emotions linked to student support. Despite the staff adapting to the mandates, a notable challenge arose from the discord between educational and industry directives, causing confusion among the students. While the study indicates staff resilience in navigating the traffic light changes, it underscores the imperative of recognizing the toll on their wellbeing. The research calls for a proactive consideration of future challenges, emphasizing the importance of safeguarding the mental and emotional health of tertiary education staff amidst potential uncertainties in educational delivery. Full article
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18 pages, 1388 KiB  
Article
Do Cases Always Deliver What They Promise? A Quality Analysis of Business Cases in Higher Education
by Christian Hofmeister and Matthias Pilz
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14010007 (registering DOI) - 21 Dec 2023
Viewed by 676
Abstract
Although the usage of case studies is very common in teaching worldwide, there has been inadequate discussion concerning the quality with respect to teaching and learning. The focus of this article is to assess the pedagogic aspect of business case studies in academic [...] Read more.
Although the usage of case studies is very common in teaching worldwide, there has been inadequate discussion concerning the quality with respect to teaching and learning. The focus of this article is to assess the pedagogic aspect of business case studies in academic teaching. On the basis of a specific tool to detect the pedagogical quality of business cases and related teaching notes, a total of nine award-winning case studies delivered by a well-known publishing house were analysed. The findings indicate that the pedagogical quality varies from case to case. There are deficits concerning the focus on problem orientation and the complexity of the cases. Further weaknesses have been identified in some case studies regarding the learner’s autonomy and prior knowledge, while with respect to real-life orientation, most case studies have a high level of accordance with a pedagogic optimum. Full article
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19 pages, 3239 KiB  
Article
Validation of the Italian Version of the Community of Inquiry Survey
by Salvatore Nizzolino, Agustí Canals and Marco Temperini
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1200; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121200 - 29 Nov 2023
Viewed by 928
Abstract
This work presents the process of validation of the community of inquiry (CoI) survey in its Italian version. For over two decades, the CoI framework has been used to conceptualize online higher-order teaching/learning experiences as processes of inquiry in which participants collaborate in [...] Read more.
This work presents the process of validation of the community of inquiry (CoI) survey in its Italian version. For over two decades, the CoI framework has been used to conceptualize online higher-order teaching/learning experiences as processes of inquiry in which participants collaborate in discourse and critical reflection to cocreate knowledge and achieve meaningful learning. The CoI is hinged on the mutual interaction of three dimensions named presences: teaching presence, social presence, and cognitive presence. The official survey to detect the level of presence perceived by learners has been predominantly conducted in English. In recent years, a number of scholars have deemed that its original format suits at least a B2 level of English proficiency, and several translations in other languages have been validated. Accordingly, the validation of the Italian version aims to improve the accuracy of the CoI questionnaire conducted among native Italian learners (n = 234). Analyses show satisfactory outputs in terms of validity and reliability of the 34 Likert-scale items, whilst adaptations to other languages open new perspectives grounded on cultural variables. Full article
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14 pages, 754 KiB  
Article
The Perceived Value of Remote Access Online Learning: An Instrument Construction and Validation Case Study
by Damian J. Rivers
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1176; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121176 - 23 Nov 2023
Viewed by 726
Abstract
The fundamental nature of the transaction between the student-as-consumer and the university-as-service provider changed during the COVID-19 pandemic as educational activities switched to a remote-access online learning format. Educational practices were primarily shaped in response to a public health crisis rather than the [...] Read more.
The fundamental nature of the transaction between the student-as-consumer and the university-as-service provider changed during the COVID-19 pandemic as educational activities switched to a remote-access online learning format. Educational practices were primarily shaped in response to a public health crisis rather than the knowledge related needs and expectations of students relative to a society in flux. As students and universities emerge into the post-pandemic landscape and in-person education returns, it is important to assess the broader consequences of such dramatic educational shifts and to understand how students-as-consumers experienced remote access online learning. The current article reports on the construction and validation of a short-survey measure used to model factors impacting the perceived value of remote access online learning from the perspective of Japanese university students. The study examines the contribution of measures pertaining to the ability to self-regulate, the provision of university support services, the perception of the learning management system, and the anticipated impact on future career opportunities. Through the application of structural equation modeling, the predictor variables accounted for 73.1% of the variance observed in the perceived value of remote access online learning. Furthermore, the tested measurement model affirmed six out of the eight hypotheses. The results are discussed in relation to educational provisions in the post-pandemic society from the perspective of student-as-consumer and university-as-service provider. Full article
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14 pages, 292 KiB  
Article
“I’d Rather Do It Single-Handed”—Nursing Students’ Struggles with Group Assignments: A Qualitative Study
by Aimei Mao, Pak-Leng Cheong, Iat-Kio Van and Hon-Lon Tam
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 1053; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13101053 - 20 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1084
Abstract
This study, framed by the GRPI (Goal, Role, Process, and Interaction) teamwork model, explores team dynamics among nursing students in performing group assignments, utilizing a qualitative research design. Twenty-three nursing students from Year 1 to Year 4 at a nursing school in Macau [...] Read more.
This study, framed by the GRPI (Goal, Role, Process, and Interaction) teamwork model, explores team dynamics among nursing students in performing group assignments, utilizing a qualitative research design. Twenty-three nursing students from Year 1 to Year 4 at a nursing school in Macau were invited. Semi-structured personal interviews were carried out. In addition, three teachers who were involved in instructing and assessing group assignments of nursing students were also interviewed. Data were analyzed using inductive and deductive approaches. The study found that although the barriers to accomplishing effective teamwork were embedded into the four dimensions of the DRPI model, they were interplayed. Communication was fundamental for teamwork, thus leading to a modified DRPI model. Teammates did not equally share the workload. Despite interpersonal conflicts among teammates, nursing students managed to stay in superficial harmony with their peers. They became more familiar with teamwork while advancing into their senior years but with decreased group communications. This study highlights various factors preventing students from transferring individualism to team players. Teaming is not an equal learning opportunity for teammates. Culturally upheld value of harmony prevails in the interpersonal relationships of the team members, which may compromise the teamwork spirit cultivation expectations from the teachers. Full article
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15 pages, 1048 KiB  
Article
An Analysis of the Mediational Effect of Socio-Cultural Factors on Student’s Career Choice Outcomes in the Built Environment: Applying the Socio-Cognitive Career Theory
by Mariam Akinlolu, Temitope Omotayo, Obas John Ebohon and Damilola Ekundayo
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 1035; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13101035 - 16 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1881
Abstract
Investigations into career development revealed the significant influence of social and cultural determinants, notably familial factors, on children’s professional aspirations. Such aspirations are moulded by their milieu, individual interests, academic environments, and socio-economic contexts. South Africa’s unique socio-political history introduces complexity into career [...] Read more.
Investigations into career development revealed the significant influence of social and cultural determinants, notably familial factors, on children’s professional aspirations. Such aspirations are moulded by their milieu, individual interests, academic environments, and socio-economic contexts. South Africa’s unique socio-political history introduces complexity into career development pathways. The intricate relationships between ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic backgrounds vis-a-vis career outcomes of South African youth remain underexplored. This research aimed to understand these influences within the construction domain, emphasising cognitive facets such as self-efficacy and societal endorsements. The Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) served as the foundational framework, with structural equation modelling employed for causal analysis. A focus was given to early university students, predominantly from Construction Management. The study showcased pathways for informed career decisions in construction and underscored the relevance of the SCCT, especially for women in traditionally male-dominated sectors. The study culminated in unveiling pathways for informed career decisions in construction, reinforcing the pertinence of the SCCT framework, especially concerning women in traditionally male-dominated spheres like construction. Acknowledging the scarcity of empirical studies using SCCT within the construction sphere is pertinent. Full article
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16 pages, 1475 KiB  
Review
Intergenerational Learning and Its Impact on the Improvement of Educational Processes
by Juan Manuel Trujillo-Torres, Inmaculada Aznar-Díaz, María Pilar Cáceres-Reche, Trinidad Mentado-Labao and Aleix Barrera-Corominas
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 1019; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13101019 - 09 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1719
Abstract
The promotion of intergenerational dialogue is postulated as one of the most frequently used strategies to promote meaningful learning. The objective is to analyze the impact of intergenerational dynamics on the learning process. To this end, this work is based on the methodology [...] Read more.
The promotion of intergenerational dialogue is postulated as one of the most frequently used strategies to promote meaningful learning. The objective is to analyze the impact of intergenerational dynamics on the learning process. To this end, this work is based on the methodology of a systematic review following the PRISMA method through the establishment of inclusion and exclusion criteria and analysis of their suitability. The priority indicator was to collect empirical experiences in the WOS and Scopus databases that implemented strategies on intergenerational learning and promoted improvements in learning, obtaining a total of 14 documents to be analyzed. The results of the review reaffirm the effectiveness of promoting dynamics of this type, observing positive outcomes in different sets of samples in six main areas: (1) attitudes, well-being, and happiness; (2) integration of vulnerable groups; (3) improvement of family relationships; (4) promotion of social and human values; (5) prevention of diseases and increased knowledge about health; and (6) combating the generational digital divide. There are also weaknesses associated with these experiences, such as the strong involvement required by the participants or the initial prejudices that exist between one generation and another. Full article
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19 pages, 592 KiB  
Review
Literature Review of Accreditation Systems in Higher Education
by Nelson Duarte and Ricardo Vardasca
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(6), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13060582 - 07 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4134
Abstract
This study investigates the accreditation processes in higher education across various countries, focusing on the time and bureaucratic burden associated with accrediting new courses. The aim is to identify strategies to accelerate the accreditation process for new courses in higher education institutions. A [...] Read more.
This study investigates the accreditation processes in higher education across various countries, focusing on the time and bureaucratic burden associated with accrediting new courses. The aim is to identify strategies to accelerate the accreditation process for new courses in higher education institutions. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to achieve this objective, examining the accreditation processes in Portugal, Spain, the United States, France, China, Japan, Sweden, the United Kingdom, India, and Germany. The study’s key findings revealed that the accreditation process is generally efficient in most countries, with courses receiving accreditation within a reasonable timeframe. However, the process can be more complex and time-consuming for institutions seeking accreditation for the first time or offering new or innovative courses. Institutions must meet all established criteria and promptly provide all required documentation to expedite the accreditation process. The implications of these findings suggest that higher education institutions should collaborate closely with relevant accrediting agencies to ensure a streamlined accreditation process. Institutions should also consider agency requirements and course specialization when developing new courses. Furthermore, governments play a crucial role in promoting transparency and competition among higher education institutions, which can lead to enhanced quality assurance and increased customer satisfaction in the education sector. Full article
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15 pages, 493 KiB  
Article
Universities’ and Academics’ Resources Shaping Satisfaction and Engagement: An Empirical Investigation of the Higher Education System
by Jana Prodanova and Ljupco Kocarev
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(4), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13040390 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1501
Abstract
Higher education research has claimed that the successful future of the educational service is highly dependent on the competencies and observations of the participants in the system, where service quality, employee satisfaction and engagement play an essential role in organizational competitiveness. Therefore, to [...] Read more.
Higher education research has claimed that the successful future of the educational service is highly dependent on the competencies and observations of the participants in the system, where service quality, employee satisfaction and engagement play an essential role in organizational competitiveness. Therefore, to contribute to the scarce investigation of the role of the institutions’ efforts in the support of engaged academics, we aim to assess the quality of higher education from an internal angle by investigating universities’ and academics’ resources as the antecedents of job satisfaction and engagement. The data from a survey with 322 academics from Macedonian public universities were analyzed using partial least squares structural equations modelling. The results of the estimated model reveal that institutional and educational capacities and academics’ adequate competencies are essential for accomplishing favorable perceptions, leading to a committed community dedicated to improving the higher education system. The implications underline that it is vital to recognize the institution’s potential by identifying and assessing the resources and capacities it possesses or can access. Moreover, to involve satisfied employees, universities must encourage academics’ position and integrity in the institution and promote harmonious collaboration while motivating their capacities and excellence development. Full article
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9 pages, 234 KiB  
Opinion
The Changing Face of Veterinary Professionalism—Implications for Veterinary Education
by Stuart Gordon, Tim Parkinson, Stacey Byers, Kerri Nigito, Adria Rodriguez, Catherine Werners-Butler, Jaelene Haynes and Talia Guttin
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(2), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13020182 - 09 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2437
Abstract
Veterinary professionals need to maintain currency with the rapidly expanding knowledge, techniques, and diagnostic skills available to the profession, while also accommodating the developing needs and expectations of clients and other veterinary stakeholders. Today, societal influence and expectations impose a heavy demand on [...] Read more.
Veterinary professionals need to maintain currency with the rapidly expanding knowledge, techniques, and diagnostic skills available to the profession, while also accommodating the developing needs and expectations of clients and other veterinary stakeholders. Today, societal influence and expectations impose a heavy demand on veterinary practitioners, making it essential for tertiary veterinary education to equip veterinary graduates with the skills necessary to face these challenges and flourish in their profession. This paper explores four challenges faced by veterinary education in the development, maintenance, and upkeep of professional skills training: the divarication between employer expectations and veterinary education, the impact of demographic changes on the profession, the influence of institutional structures on the teaching of professionalism, and the risks associated with outdated models of professionalism training. The teaching of professionalism in veterinary education must continually evolve. One issue that may hinder this process is a divergence between the expectations of employers and tertiary institutions regarding the employability skills required by veterinary graduates. Veterinary professionalism education must also consider changing demographics within the profession and within society to provide all new graduates with the skills and tools necessary to succeed in the workplace, establish a sustainable work–life balance, combat burnout in new graduates, and be equipped to serve the general public. Failure to do this could result in professionalism teaching becoming complicit in a socialization process that perpetuates gender and cultural inequalities. This paper outlines some of the changes that have occurred in the veterinary profession and their implications on veterinary professionalism education. The article champions the necessity for veterinary professionalism education to evolve in concert with the constant changes in the profession. Full article

2022

Jump to: 2024, 2023, 2021

18 pages, 1105 KiB  
Article
A Long-Life Predictive Guidance with Homogeneous Competence Promotion for University Teaching Design
by Juan Jose Aciego, Alicia Claros Colome, Ignacio Gonzalez-Prieto, Angel Gonzalez-Prieto and Mario J. Duran
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13010031 - 28 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1246
Abstract
Even though planning the educational action to optimize student performance is a very complex task, teachers typically face this challenging issue with no external assistance. Previous experience is, in most cases, the main driving force in curriculum design. This procedure commonly overlooks the [...] Read more.
Even though planning the educational action to optimize student performance is a very complex task, teachers typically face this challenging issue with no external assistance. Previous experience is, in most cases, the main driving force in curriculum design. This procedure commonly overlooks the students’ perception and weakly integrates the students’ feedback by using a non-systematic approach. Furthermore, transverse competences are, unfortunately, typically omitted in this procedure. This work suggests the use of a predictive tool that determines the optimal application time of different methodological instruments. The suggested method can be used for an infinite number of scenarios of promoted competences. The results can be regarded as a guide to modify the course structure, but, more importantly, it offers valuable information to understand better what is occurring in the teaching-learning process and detect anomalies in the subject and avoid the students’ exclusion. The predictive scheme simultaneously considers the teacher’s perspective, the student’s feedback, and the previous scores in a systematic manner. Therefore, results provide a broader picture of the educational process. The proposal is assessed in a course of Electrical Machines at the University of Malaga during the academic year 2021–2022. Full article
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47 pages, 4224 KiB  
Article
The Challenge of an Interactive Audiovisual-Supported Lesson Plan: Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in Adult Education
by Constantinos Nicolaou, Maria Matsiola and George Kalliris
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 836; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12110836 - 19 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2558
Abstract
The rapid development in the fields of science, and information and communications technologies (ICTs) in recent years, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic, have brought about and continue to generate transformations in education, especially in adult education. In the present enhanced research article, [...] Read more.
The rapid development in the fields of science, and information and communications technologies (ICTs) in recent years, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic, have brought about and continue to generate transformations in education, especially in adult education. In the present enhanced research article, an interactive audiovisual-supported lesson plan template and its non-verbal role in our psychological and mental health are presented in-depth. Applying a multi-methodological approach, this interactive communication-themed adult lesson plan was executed and researched in the framework of an interactive seminar in Greece and Cyprus. The research sample consisted of adult educators as adult learners and involved empirical research where technology-enhanced research methods were applied as qualitative action research with quasi-experiments. Specifically, the attitudes and views of an adult educators’ group regarding the research interactive seminar that they participated in were re-investigated through secondary analysis. Similarly, the suitability of specific ICTs as well as whether they help or change the physical or psychological and mental health of the participants at the end of a teaching–learning procedure as a pilot case study were explored. The research results, effects and findings confirm the current debate on the employment of contemporary ICTs within the framework of the educational process of technology-enhanced learning in education (including adult education) as derived both by the literature, and by the research results, effects and findings of various other studies and research papers. Finally, this study can be used as a basis for creating and/or developing an audiovisual-supported lesson plan aimed at adult learners as an alternative approach. Full article
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32 pages, 3068 KiB  
Article
How UK HE STEM Students Were Motivated to Switch Their Cameras on: A Study of the Development of Compassionate Communications in Task-focused Online Group Meetings
by J. M. P. V. K. Jayasundara, Theo Gilbert, Saskia Kersten and Li Meng
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(5), 317; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12050317 - 30 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3015
Abstract
HE’s pandemic-driven shift to online platforms has increased social and learning disconnection amongst students. In online group work/teamwork, many are reluctant to switch on their cameras to be more present to others. Compassion in group work/teamwork is defined as noticing, not normalizing, one’s [...] Read more.
HE’s pandemic-driven shift to online platforms has increased social and learning disconnection amongst students. In online group work/teamwork, many are reluctant to switch on their cameras to be more present to others. Compassion in group work/teamwork is defined as noticing, not normalizing, one’s own and/or others’ distress or disadvantaging and taking wise action to prevent or reduce this. This notion of compassion is being assessed in the HE sector using filmed task-focused in-class group work meetings to identify levels of both inclusivity and criticality around the team. This study investigates the use and outcomes of using the compassionate communications strategies (that were developed in and for the offline classroom) in online team meetings. In this mixed-methods study, two groups of four international STEM students, each from a sample of five UK universities, were video-recorded in task-focused group work meetings (TGMs) before and after an online interactive 90-min training session (‘the intervention’) on the Cognitive Skills of Compassionate Communications (CSCC) in teams. A comparison of the (pre and post CSCC intervention) quantitative and qualitative data results indicated, post-intervention, a significant increase in students’ screen gaze attentiveness to each other, and reasons why students’ motivation to switch on their cameras had changed. Full article
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14 pages, 307 KiB  
Article
Tales of Doctoral Students: Motivations and Expectations on the Route to the Unknown
by Sara Diogo, Andreia Gonçalves, Sónia Cardoso and Teresa Carvalho
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(4), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040286 - 18 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3167
Abstract
This paper provides a reflection on the way changes taking place in doctoral education are being perceived and internalized by doctoral students. The Doctoral perceptions are analyzed through Ph.D. candidates’ motivations to enroll in the program and to their levels of satisfaction with [...] Read more.
This paper provides a reflection on the way changes taking place in doctoral education are being perceived and internalized by doctoral students. The Doctoral perceptions are analyzed through Ph.D. candidates’ motivations to enroll in the program and to their levels of satisfaction with the supervision experience. Comparisons between national and international students, as well as differences according to doctoral programs’ scientific areas, i.e., between students enrolled in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and in Social Sciences, Languages and Humanities (SSLH) are established. Based on a case study developed in a Portuguese university, conclusions point to the dominance of a romanticized, traditional view of doctoral education, with the academic profession at its core. This view is mostly shared by international students and those from SSLH scientific areas. In turn, national Ph.D. candidates and those from STEM areas have incorporated a more instrumental view of doctoral education, aiming for training participants to professions outside academia. Full article
17 pages, 299 KiB  
Article
Teaching Staff and Student Perceptions of Staff Support for Student Mental Health: A University Case Study
by Helen Payne
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(4), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040237 - 25 Mar 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4357
Abstract
Background: There are significant concerns for student mental health in higher education. New factors affect student mental health, and campus counselling services are overwhelmed. Struggling students turn to ideally placed familiar teaching staff for support. This qualitative study, conducted in an East of [...] Read more.
Background: There are significant concerns for student mental health in higher education. New factors affect student mental health, and campus counselling services are overwhelmed. Struggling students turn to ideally placed familiar teaching staff for support. This qualitative study, conducted in an East of England university, aimed to explore student and staff perceptions of support offered by teaching staff to students grappling with their mental health. It is unique, combining both staff and student perceptions, many of which overlapped. Methods: A thematic analysis was conducted of in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a small number of self-selecting staff/students. Findings (results): Staff felt inadequate in several aspects, and students agreed to give useful suggestions for their preferred support. Conclusions: It was cautiously established that staff training in mental health literacy (knowledge, skills, attributes, and understanding) was required. Specific training was recommended in pastoral care for personal tutors and for staff pedagogy on health professional programmes. Finally, teaching staff needed support when supporting students with poor mental health. Such training and support can be integrated into a preventative, university-wide, holistic policy for student mental health commensurate with the University Mental Health Charter. Embedding such supportive practice into the curriculum is preferable to add-on services and/or interventions. Full article

2021

Jump to: 2024, 2023, 2022

13 pages, 288 KiB  
Review
Fostering the Development of Professionalism in Veterinary Students: Challenges and Implications for Veterinary Professionalism Curricula
by Stuart Gordon, Dianne Gardner, Jenny Weston, Charlotte Bolwell, Jackie Benschop and Tim Parkinson
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 720; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11110720 - 09 Nov 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2643
Abstract
The importance of professional skills teaching and assessment within veterinary education has recently been highlighted in the veterinary education literature. This academic discourse follows the acknowledgement by both veterinary employers and graduates themselves that new graduates often lack the professional skills and attitudes [...] Read more.
The importance of professional skills teaching and assessment within veterinary education has recently been highlighted in the veterinary education literature. This academic discourse follows the acknowledgement by both veterinary employers and graduates themselves that new graduates often lack the professional skills and attitudes needed for success in clinical veterinary practice. Traditionally, veterinary curricula have focused solely on teaching content knowledge and clinical skills; however, veterinary education curricula clearly must also contain dedicated instruction in veterinary professionalism. This must include instruction in communication skills, emotional intelligence, cultural awareness, teamwork abilities, dispute resolution strategies and the awareness that multiple approaches may be required to resolve challenges. It has become unrealistic to expect students to rely on observation and role modelling to foster the development of professionalism. There is a need to incorporate explicit learning activities that reinforce the knowledge, attitudes, values, and behaviours that characterise veterinary professionalism. While role modelling remains a key aspect of the veterinary professionalism learning that takes place through the informal/hidden curriculum, many students have often had more experiences with negative role models than with positive ones. This can lead to the development of a tolerance or normalisation of negative behaviours and a decline in students’ perceptions of professionalism. This article aims to continue recent conversations on professional skills teaching within veterinary education, define what is meant by veterinary professionalism and consider the plethora of terminology used when trying to establish a definition, highlight those attributes of veterinary professionalism deemed important by veterinary stakeholders for career success and employability, and explore the challenges of incorporating the teaching and assessment of professional traits into veterinary education. Full article
12 pages, 660 KiB  
Article
University Professor Training in Times of COVID-19: Analysis of Training Programs and Perception of Impact on Teaching Practices
by Anabel Ramos-Pla, Isabel del Arco and Òscar Flores Alarcia
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 684; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11110684 - 27 Oct 2021
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 3045
Abstract
During the confinement and post-confinement period, the continuous training centers at different Catalan universities adapted the lifelong learning of professors. The present study analyzes the education of lecturers from Catalan universities before and after the pandemic, as well as their perception of its [...] Read more.
During the confinement and post-confinement period, the continuous training centers at different Catalan universities adapted the lifelong learning of professors. The present study analyzes the education of lecturers from Catalan universities before and after the pandemic, as well as their perception of its impact. A documentary analysis was performed of the continuous training programs for professors. Posteriorly, an enquiry was made about the perception of impact of this training, through a descriptive and inferential analysis with the use of a questionnaire designed ad hoc. Results indicated an increase in training associated with institutional digital tools, online evaluation, and design of online courses. The efforts by the professors to implement the knowledge acquired is underlined, with a higher perception of impact observed in the areas of Social and Legal Sciences and Arts and Humanities. In addition, the main difficulties perceived were the lack of time for adapting their practice of teaching with the knowledge acquired, as well as the complexity of performing an online evaluation. It is concluded that there is a need for continuous training programs that help establish support networks and collaboration between professors for the improvement of teaching, and in which one of the priorities is online evaluation. Full article
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