Social and Emotional Education in Schools

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Education and Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2022) | Viewed by 31824

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN, UK
Interests: the contribution of schools to wellbeing; mental health; personal and social development; counselling and guidance in schools

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For many years now, the focus of education has been very much on cognitive development and outcomes. Even in areas of education known for a wide and wholistic view of child development, such as early years education, this is the case. There has been a recognition recently, even from organisations such as the OECD (Organisation for Economic Development), that this narrowing of focus needs to change and that there needs to be much more emphasis upon the social and emotional aspects of education. The recent impact of COVID-19 has also led to a call for a re-imagining of the purpose, nature, and location of education. In this Special Issue, we would like to focus on this reimaging of the social and emotional aspects of education. We invite contributions that focus on learning mainly in schools or educational settings and that explore how and what schools can do to contribute to the social and emotional education of young people.

Debates about social and emotional education have tended to focus on programmes for health education or for the development of mental health, social skills, or emotional aspects of young people’s education. We are keen to explore in this Special Issue how to go beyond programmes, although they clearly have a part to play in the curricular offer. We would welcome contributions that explore the conception of social and emotional education and its place in the current landscape; that engage with how schools can develop these aspects, including the implications for how schools are run and the expected outcomes of such education. Other aspects might include how learning is conceived of and how these aspects relate to pedagogy as well as the curriculum.

Prof. Dr. Colleen McLaughlin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • the social and emotional learning aspects of education
  • the school’s contribution to social and emotional development
  • wholistic approaches to education
  • personal, social, and health education
  • learning for wellbeing

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 177 KiB  
Editorial
Editorial for the Special Edition on Social and Emotional Education
by Colleen McLaughlin
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 502; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13050502 - 16 May 2023
Viewed by 982
Abstract
This collection of eight articles in this special edition clearly exemplifies the variety of thoughts and definitions relating to the territory of social and emotional education [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

16 pages, 1461 KiB  
Article
Gratitude and Adolescents’ Mental Health and Well-Being: Effects and Gender Differences for a Positive Social Media Intervention in High Schools
by Giacomo Bono, Taylor Duffy and Erin L. Merz
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(3), 320; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13030320 - 21 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3111
Abstract
Gratitude interventions can provide cost-effective support for mental health to under-resourced schools. This study aims to better understand the effects of a promising intervention Bono et al. evaluated in 2020. Using a quasi-experimental design (where classes were assigned to a thanking app, gratitude [...] Read more.
Gratitude interventions can provide cost-effective support for mental health to under-resourced schools. This study aims to better understand the effects of a promising intervention Bono et al. evaluated in 2020. Using a quasi-experimental design (where classes were assigned to a thanking app, gratitude curriculum, app + curriculum, or control condition), that evaluation found that the full (combined) intervention impacted students’ self-reported trait gratitude, anxiety, and subjective well-being (SWB) over six weeks, compared against only the control condition. However, here, we evaluated the individual intervention components’ effectiveness on students (N = 326) using multilevel modeling. As hypothesized, the full intervention impacted students’ gratitude, anxiety, and SWB, compared to the control condition, but impacted SWB more than the app-only condition, suggesting that teaching gratitude science makes thanking more meaningful. Then, we examined if stress mediated these effects. Perceived stress partially mediated the relationships of gratitude with depression and SWB and fully mediated the relationship of gratitude with anxiety. Additionally, changes in perceived stress and SWB differed by gender. Finally, we qualitatively analyzed thanks exchanges during the intervention using informal content analysis and found themes of psychological safety—a critical feature neglected in other interventions. We conclude with recommendations for optimizing school gratitude interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)
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15 pages, 280 KiB  
Article
MetaEmotions at School: A Program for Promoting Emotional and MetaEmotional Intelligence at School; a Research-Intervention Study
by Antonella D’Amico and Alessandro Geraci
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(9), 589; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12090589 - 29 Aug 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2141
Abstract
MetaEmotions at Schools is a SEL program that aims at promoting the culture of emotional and metaemotional intelligence in schools, and at improving emotional awareness both among teachers and students. It is a train-the-trainers program that unfolds in five steps, respectively, aimed at [...] Read more.
MetaEmotions at Schools is a SEL program that aims at promoting the culture of emotional and metaemotional intelligence in schools, and at improving emotional awareness both among teachers and students. It is a train-the-trainers program that unfolds in five steps, respectively, aimed at stimulating teachers and students to: (1) develop emotional literacy; (2) create emotionally inclusive environments; (3) build tools, materials and methods for emotionally inclusive classes; (4) develop didactic method mediated by emotions; (5) become ambassadors of the metaemotional intelligence at school and beyond. In this study, we report some results of the first application of the training program, focusing in particular on the effect of the program on emotional and metaemotional intelligence of participants. A total of 264 pupils from lower secondary schools of five Italian cities were recruited and divided in 9 intervention and 9 comparison classes. All participants were administered with emotional and metaemotional intelligence assessment tools before and after the training program. The results showed that emotional abilities scores in the intervention groups tended to be stable over time compared to the comparison groups ones which tended to decrease. Moreover, the pupils showed a reduced tendency to overestimate their emotional abilities. These results pave the way to further applications of the program and shed the light on areas of improvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)
18 pages, 849 KiB  
Article
The Emotional Competence Assessment Questionnaire (ECAQ) for Children Aged from 3 to 5 Years: Validity and Reliability Evidence
by Montse Bartroli, Ariadna Angulo-Brunet, Marina Bosque-Prous, Catrina Clotas and Albert Espelt
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(7), 489; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12070489 - 15 Jul 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3870
Abstract
In order to assess emotional competence in children, it is necessary to have psychometrically sound measures. To the best of our knowledge, there is no available tool to assess emotional competence in children from 3 to 5 years old that assesses the five [...] Read more.
In order to assess emotional competence in children, it is necessary to have psychometrically sound measures. To the best of our knowledge, there is no available tool to assess emotional competence in children from 3 to 5 years old that assesses the five emotional competences of the Bisquerra model and can be easily and quickly answered in the school environment. The objective of this study is to develop a measure, the Emotional Competence Assessment Questionnaire (ECAQ), and to provide evidence of its psychometric quality. Qualitative evidence was obtained from a systematic review, from two expert committees and from five discussion groups. On the other hand, quantitative validity and reliability evidence was obtained from a sample of 1088 students and other smaller subsamples. The results suggest that the ECAQ is a short and easy-to-use tool, easily understood by administrators. The quantitative results confirm a general factor of emotional competence adjusted for three specific factors. This factor has excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The ECAQ has therefore been shown to be a promising tool for assessing emotional competence in children between 3 and 5 years of age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)
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16 pages, 3724 KiB  
Article
Translanguaging as a Strategy for Supporting Multilingual Learners’ Social Emotional Learning
by Juyoung Song, Deborah Howard and Walny Olazabal-Arias
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(7), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12070475 - 9 Jul 2022
Viewed by 5974
Abstract
In this study, two teachers of multilingual learners in the U.S. report case stories about how they implemented translanguaging approaches in support of their students’ social emotional learning. Translanguaging refers to bilinguals’ meaning-making process using their multilingual resources. In the first case story, [...] Read more.
In this study, two teachers of multilingual learners in the U.S. report case stories about how they implemented translanguaging approaches in support of their students’ social emotional learning. Translanguaging refers to bilinguals’ meaning-making process using their multilingual resources. In the first case story, Deborah created and utilized multilingual writing checklists in her 3rd grade classroom to encourage and support students’ multilingual writing practices. She enacted translanguaging as a collaborative space, which enabled students to shift their roles from learners to teachers, helping them to increase their confidence and collaboration. In the second case story, Walny applied translanguaging approaches to reading in his 9th grade English classroom. He utilized translanguaging to explain literary concepts, create a multilingual reading list, and send letters to families in students’ first languages, enacting translanguaging as a space for connecting the multilingual texts. His approaches enhanced his students’ engagement with the text, the teacher, and the peers. The results highlight the significance of teachers’ advocating for multilingual learners’ use of their entire linguistic repertoire for their academic success and personal growth, providing implications for language teacher education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)
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13 pages, 277 KiB  
Article
Dependence of Socio-Emotional Competence Expression on Gender and Grade for K5–K12 Students
by Tomas Butvilas, Remigijus Bubnys, Jordi Colomer and Dolors Cañabate
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(5), 341; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12050341 - 12 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3223
Abstract
Socio-emotional education is referred to as the missing part that links academic knowledge to successes in school, family, community, workplace, and life. Socio-emotional education, in conjunction with academic instruction, aims to lay the groundwork for a sound moral education. This manuscript is aimed [...] Read more.
Socio-emotional education is referred to as the missing part that links academic knowledge to successes in school, family, community, workplace, and life. Socio-emotional education, in conjunction with academic instruction, aims to lay the groundwork for a sound moral education. This manuscript is aimed at proving that socio-emotional education may improve children’s mental health. In total, 1322 students (of grades K5–K12) participated in this study back in October 2020. A statistically validated and partially modified questionnaire according to The Limbic Performance Indicators™ (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.92, p < 0.000) was used to assess general education school students’ social–emotional competencies. The study uses an abbreviated version of the questionnaire adapted by the Lithuanian Association of Social Emotional Education, which has been adapted with the consent of the selected age group. As a result, this study explores how to determine general education school students’ knowledge and skills in socio-emotional education while also identifying the best pedagogical approaches to addressing socio-emotional education. According to research findings, students that participated in the study displayed more personal values, respect for others, internal balance, collaboration, emotional perception of others, or basic emotional needs. Personal values, respect for others, emotional perception of others, internal balance, support, and basic emotional needs were estimated to be greater in the target group of girls than in the target group of boys. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)
15 pages, 1028 KiB  
Article
Self-Concept, Prosocial School Behaviors, Well-Being, and Academic Skills in Elementary School Students: A Whole-Child Perspective
by Carina Wikman, Mara Westling Allodi and Laura Anne Ferrer-Wreder
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(5), 298; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12050298 - 21 Apr 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3274
Abstract
Whole-child development focuses on supporting not only academic but also social emotional skills. This cross-sectional study’s aim was to examine the associations between the child-rated self-concept and well-being, teacher-rated prosocial school behaviors, and academic skills (as measured by child performance tasks) and to [...] Read more.
Whole-child development focuses on supporting not only academic but also social emotional skills. This cross-sectional study’s aim was to examine the associations between the child-rated self-concept and well-being, teacher-rated prosocial school behaviors, and academic skills (as measured by child performance tasks) and to examine if there were group differences by gender for these constructs. The sample was 143 s grade students (M age = 8 years old). The results indicate that self-concept correlated highly with well-being and moderately with prosocial behaviors, while academic skills correlated moderately with prosocial behaviors. The results also show that the boys had lower average prosocial behavior (teacher-rated) and self-concept (child-rated) ratings relative to the girls. The findings indicate that prosocial behavior, well-being, and self-concept can be measured in psychometrically sound and practically meaningful ways in Swedish elementary schools. Because many of the socioemotional and behavioral constructs were correlated with academic skills, these constructs could be important targets for early academic support interventions inspired by a whole-child approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)
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21 pages, 1065 KiB  
Article
Indices of Favourable and Unfavourable Emotions in the Inter-Actional Context of the Classroom: Constructions from the Chilean Case
by Natalia Contreras-Quiroz, David Román-Soto, Sofía Druker-Ibáñez, Jorge Caldera-Mercado and Jorge Rodríguez-Becerra
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12010011 - 28 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3377
Abstract
The system for measuring the quality of education (SIMCE) is a standardised evaluation that provides results on the academic achievement of Chilean students, while also including indicators of personal and social development. Through a mixed analysis of variables extracted from these indicators, the [...] Read more.
The system for measuring the quality of education (SIMCE) is a standardised evaluation that provides results on the academic achievement of Chilean students, while also including indicators of personal and social development. Through a mixed analysis of variables extracted from these indicators, the purpose of this research study is to build a measurement system to assess the favourable and unfavourable emotions of students who took the test in 2018. To contextualise this work, a systematic literature review was carried out synthetising scientific evidence concerning emotions and the interactional context of the classroom. Through a methodological transposition, a qualitative theoretical model epistemologically grounded on radical constructivism was validated quantitatively. This transposition resulted in the construction of three indices of favourable and unfavourable emotions: motivation arising from interaction, exclusionary interaction and interactional context. The results show favourable and unfavourable emotions for learning are a variable in the SIMCE indicators that can be used to understand student academic achievement, confirming existing empirical evidence regarding the explanatory and predictive value of emotions in students’ performance. These results highlight the potential benefits of expanding on this type of research to improve the quality of Chilean education based on the resources already available in the current evaluation system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)
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17 pages, 705 KiB  
Article
Career Exploration as Social and Emotional Learning: A Collaborative Ethnography with Spanish Children from Low-Income Contexts
by Soledad Romero-Rodríguez, Celia Moreno-Morilla, David Muñoz-Villaraviz and Marina Resurrección-Pérez
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 431; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11080431 - 15 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3442
Abstract
Children’s career exploration is a critical aspect of career development. Through it, children explore the interplay between their different life roles, including those related to work (in a broad sense), learning, and education. Through career exploration, children can (re)construct the emotions derived from [...] Read more.
Children’s career exploration is a critical aspect of career development. Through it, children explore the interplay between their different life roles, including those related to work (in a broad sense), learning, and education. Through career exploration, children can (re)construct the emotions derived from the interactions between personal and contextual factors by giving meaning to life experiences. This process involves cognitive and affective activities. Evidence suggests that children from low-income contexts are more likely to drop out of school and show lower educational aspirations. Providing career exploration interventions introduces an intentional learning that allows children to develop a higher level of career awareness and increase their aspirations for the future. The sample analyzed consisted of students between 6 and 8 years old from a low-income school in Seville (Spain). The data collection methods used have been those of collaborative ethnography (e.g., unstructured interviews, student productions, and photographs). Co-analysis was the chosen method for systematizing the information used in this research. Our results have revealed a system of influences which plays an important role in the different contexts and emotions that the children derive from their interactions with different spaces and socialization agents. In short, through career exploration, children mobilize exploratory behaviors, providing emotional responses. Collaborative ethnography has been shown to be a valid process for research on career exploration as social and emotional learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)
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