Educational Justice

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2016) | Viewed by 38948

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Catholic Theology, University of Münster, D-48149 Münster, Germany
Interests: religious education and democratic citizenship; religion and civil society; religion in the public sphere; educational justice; intercultural and interreligious education; legitimacy and acceptability of religious education in the public; private schools operated by the church; gender research in theology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Educational justice continues to be a major global challenge. In many countries, children do not have any access to literacy/education/educational formation. In other countries, not all students have the opportunity to acquire primary education, although, according to the milleniums goals, the rate of primary schooling increased to 91%. However, in countries affected by conflict, the proportion of out-of-school children increased from 30% in 1999 to 36% in 2012. In European countries, such as Germany, the success in school/school attainment highly depends on the respective social background, and there exists a close relationship between social background and school success. These issues are closely linked to discrimination by sex, race, or religion. In this context, the great worldwide migration movement is a great challenge, not only today but also in future. Consequently, the schooling of so many children with a background of migration—children, who are often traumatized by their experiences of war and violence—brings with it new conflicts and tasks.

This guest-edited issue, "Educational Justice", is dealing with these issues and casts a glance at the following questions: Which concepts of justice are in the background of educational policy? How are countries, educational policy and the education on site dealing with these questions? And how is it possible to realize educational justice in the field of teaching?

Judith Könemann
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • access to literacy/educational formation
  • relationship between social background and school success
  • concepts of justice
  • educational justice in the field of teaching
  • migration and education, impact, consequences
  • best practice of educational justice

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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127 KiB  
Editorial
Educational Justice
by Judith Könemann
Educ. Sci. 2017, 7(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7020053 - 4 May 2017
Viewed by 4099
Abstract
Last year, Education Sciencies initiated a Special Issue on the topic of educational justice throughout the world. Now, the guest-edited issue has been closed [...]
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educational Justice)

Research

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220 KiB  
Article
Religious Education towards Justice: What Kind of Justice Is to Be Taught in a Christian Context?
by Monika Bobbert
Educ. Sci. 2017, 7(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7010030 - 21 Feb 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 7447
Abstract
Education is a human right. It prepares human beings for life, helps to develop individual abilities and opens up social opportunities—e.g., earning one’s own living. Religion interprets our human existence in connection to a transcendental dimension. Religion can also influence moral values and [...] Read more.
Education is a human right. It prepares human beings for life, helps to develop individual abilities and opens up social opportunities—e.g., earning one’s own living. Religion interprets our human existence in connection to a transcendental dimension. Religion can also influence moral values and behavior. The Christian religion established a basis for social life, and thus deals with religious and moral justice. As the Christian faith is understood as the identity of the qualities of love of God, of your neighbor and even of your enemy, it has to look for justice in the world. Modern Christian ethics does unfold interpersonal and global justice for all people and tries to give good reasons for moral claims. Religious education in a Christian context has to answer the question of what kind of justice is to be taught and by what means justice, as a goal of education, can be reached within such a setting. This article will unfold, from an ethical point of view, what kind of knowledge and competence teachers must have and what kind of goals can be followed with regard to their pupils or students. The results of this reflection imply certain pedagogical methods and means and exclude others—although it is not possible to go more deeply into a pedagogical discussion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educational Justice)
186 KiB  
Article
Educational Justice Due to More Education? Requests for a Solution Strategy
by Bernhard Grümme
Educ. Sci. 2017, 7(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7010021 - 24 Jan 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4807
Abstract
Why does education fail to realize educational justice? Why does religious education not play a part in contributing to educational justice to some degree, as it is technically located in the logic of its handed down biblical message? On the one hand, education [...] Read more.
Why does education fail to realize educational justice? Why does religious education not play a part in contributing to educational justice to some degree, as it is technically located in the logic of its handed down biblical message? On the one hand, education is socially testified as being at a crucial moment of educational justice, on the other hand, it is not only political and institutional determinants that seem to be opposed to that. In class, there are moments that counteract the abolition of educational injustice. Because of its complexity, confinement of interest and inner differentiation, the pressing problem of injustice in educational processes can only be processed in the complex access at the macro-, meso- and micro-level. The concern of the thoughts at hand is on their interpenetration of analytical, hermeneutical and pragmatical factors and, in that respect, we look to outline the demands on religious educational processes in religious education in schools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educational Justice)
190 KiB  
Article
Teaching for Justice in a Contradictory World
by George Reilly
Educ. Sci. 2017, 7(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7010010 - 5 Jan 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4507
Abstract
School today is caught in the dilemma of being expected to educate young people so that they can be integrated into modern industrial society. Because of structural injustices in society, not all students have equal chances in this integration process. Education in school [...] Read more.
School today is caught in the dilemma of being expected to educate young people so that they can be integrated into modern industrial society. Because of structural injustices in society, not all students have equal chances in this integration process. Education in school is also expected to impart proficiency in skills which go beyond the functional skills which a productive society needs. These softer skills can threaten the aims of modern society because they have the potential to question its underlying rationale. Young people learn these skills in their everyday lives with their peers outside of school. They form part of the cultural wealth which students bring with them to school. It is up to school to draw on this cultural wealth of students and to foster the various forms of cultural capital contained therein so that students learn not to be victims of a one-sided schooling which reproduces those injustices that pervade modern society by placing excess value on cultural assets which are favored by dominant groups in society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educational Justice)
173 KiB  
Article
Culturally Responsive Teaching: Implications for Educational Justice
by Magnus O. Bassey
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(4), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6040035 - 2 Nov 2016
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 17537
Abstract
Educational justice is a major global challenge. In most underdeveloped countries, many students do not have access to education and in most advanced democracies, school attainment and success are still, to a large extent, dependent on a student’s social background. However, it has [...] Read more.
Educational justice is a major global challenge. In most underdeveloped countries, many students do not have access to education and in most advanced democracies, school attainment and success are still, to a large extent, dependent on a student’s social background. However, it has often been argued that social justice is an essential part of teachers’ work in a democracy. This article raises an important overriding question: how can we realize the goal of educational justice in the field of teaching? In this essay, I examine culturally responsive teaching as an educational practice and conclude that it is possible to realize educational justice in the field of teaching because in its true implementation, culturally responsive teaching conceptualizes the connection between education and social justice and creates the space needed for discussing social change in society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educational Justice)
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