Inclusive Education and Practices for Students with Disabilities

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Special and Inclusive Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 7949

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan
Interests: disability studies; economics of education; inclusive education; education policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Educational Sciences is pleased to announce a call for papers for a Special Issue on “Research and Practice in Inclusive Education”. This call for papers aims to advance the state of knowledge and expertise regarding inclusive education, and though not exclusively, we welcome submissions in the following themes: analysis of teaching challenges in inclusive education; teaching effectiveness; factors determining teachers’ thought and performances; the linkages among teachers, parents, school administrations, and students; financing and access; inclusive education policy; empirical studies on learning outcomes such as cognitive and noncognitive skills of both students with or without disabilities; COVID-19 and inclusive education.

Full papers in English, in .doc or .docx formats should be submitted by 31 December 2022. Papers submitted will be evaluated through a standard peer review process. Authors of the selected papers will be notified by email. Submission of a paper implies that the author has the intention of publishing the paper in Education Sciences, and the manuscript is original and not currently under submission at any other journal.

Dr. Kamal Lamichhane
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inclusive education
  • inclusive education and practices
  • students with disabilities
  • diversity & higher education

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 346 KiB  
Article
Supportive Factors in Inclusive Mathematics Education: Mathematics Teachers’ Perspective
by Barbora Vodičková, Petra Mitašíková and Mária Slavíčková
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13050465 - 01 May 2023
Viewed by 1856
Abstract
The aim of this study is to investigate which supportive factors positively influence inclusive mathematics education so that it is accessible to all pupils in mainstream primary and secondary school settings from the mathematics teachers’ perspectives. The study is designed as a qualitative [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to investigate which supportive factors positively influence inclusive mathematics education so that it is accessible to all pupils in mainstream primary and secondary school settings from the mathematics teachers’ perspectives. The study is designed as a qualitative descriptive study. It was conducted by collecting 16 narratives about selected pupils/students provided by mathematics teachers. In them, they described their experiences with inclusive mathematics education. Teachers provided information about their pupils with any form of disability (health, social, or other) or an increased need for support and about their situations in mathematics education and inclusion. The stories were structured by the researchers into units of meaning, numerically coded, content-analyzed, and categorized. Participants in the study were 16 mathematics teachers who were working in mainstream schools. From the stories, we identified 583 meaning units that were assigned a numerical code. Using continuous qualitative analysis procedures, we abstracted five main final categories that describe the support factors in inclusive mathematics education from the mathematics teachers’ perspective in terms of including every pupil without distinction, including those who require some level of additional support. The final categories include: 1. Identifying the pupil’s/student’s internal resources in mathematics education; 2. The mathematics teacher’s responsive approach toward the pupil/student; 3. Modifying conditions in mathematics instruction and implementing accommodations for pupils/students; 4. School-family collaboration; 5. Support mechanisms for the school as an institution in the context of inclusive mathematics education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Practices for Students with Disabilities)
18 pages, 866 KiB  
Article
Development of the Emirati Child Adaptation Scale (ECAS) for Assessing the Behavioral Adaptation Skills of Children with and without Disabilities in the UAE
by Ousha AlMuhairy, Efthymia Efthymiou, Hala ElHoweris, Mahmoud Alshathly and Abdelaziz Sartawi
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(4), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13040406 - 17 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1165
Abstract
Behavioral problems cause limitations in the social skills of children without disabilities and affect the functionality of children with disabilities. The Emirati child adaptation scale (ECAS) was developed in the UAE to provide reliable and valid information on the behavioral adaptation skills in [...] Read more.
Behavioral problems cause limitations in the social skills of children without disabilities and affect the functionality of children with disabilities. The Emirati child adaptation scale (ECAS) was developed in the UAE to provide reliable and valid information on the behavioral adaptation skills in children with and without intellectual disability (ID). The scale’s item pool consists of 651 items that identify behavioral adaptation deficits across the 10 domain–skill areas of communication, pre-academic, listening, social, self-care, self-orientation, motor skills, operational society, life, and health and safety. The scale was administered to 1542 children with disabilities and 920 children without disabilities. The scale is deemed essential, as it enables psychologists, special education teachers, health professionals, and researchers to implement a reliable psychometric tool of adaptive and behavioral functioning of 1–18-year-old individuals. The development and structure of the Emirati child adaptation scale is described and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Practices for Students with Disabilities)
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13 pages, 288 KiB  
Article
Social Capital and Posttraumatic Growth of Students with Acquired Visual Impairment in Japanese Schools for the Blind
by Erika Matsuda and Hisae Miyauchi
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(3), 256; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13030256 - 28 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1624
Abstract
The induction of posttraumatic growth (PTG) is important for realizing the reintegration of people with acquired visual impairment to society. In Japan, many of these individuals receive education at schools for the blind as enrolled students. The purpose of this study was to [...] Read more.
The induction of posttraumatic growth (PTG) is important for realizing the reintegration of people with acquired visual impairment to society. In Japan, many of these individuals receive education at schools for the blind as enrolled students. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between cognitive and structural social capital at schools for the blind and the PTG of students with acquired visual impairment. A questionnaire survey was conducted among students enrolled in vocational courses at schools for the blind throughout Japan. The results of the analysis of data from a sample of 255 students indicated that cognitive social capital with peers and teachers and structural social capital indicated by the frequency of participation in school club activities and interaction with local people were positively related to PTG. The findings highlight that social capital at schools for the blind are associated with markers of PTG in students with acquired visual impairment. Moreover, the findings highlight the value of schools for the blind with regards to the social participation of students with acquired visual impairment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Practices for Students with Disabilities)
23 pages, 269 KiB  
Article
Mentoring Postsecondary Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Faculty and Staff Mentor Perspectives
by Laura M. Heron, Rumi Agarwal and Shanna L. Burke
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(2), 213; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13020213 - 17 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1430
Abstract
As the number of inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) programs in the United States increases, a greater number of young adults with an intellectual disability (ID) are attending college. To ensure students with IDs have the same opportunity to succeed in the postsecondary education [...] Read more.
As the number of inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) programs in the United States increases, a greater number of young adults with an intellectual disability (ID) are attending college. To ensure students with IDs have the same opportunity to succeed in the postsecondary education environment as their peers without disabilities, it is critical that research is conducted to explore the support mechanisms that contribute to successful outcomes for this population. To address existing gaps in the literature, the present study involved a qualitative investigation of the experiences of faculty and staff mentors who formally mentored students with ID over the course of one academic year. Four themes provided unique insights into (1) the activities that were undertaken by faculty and staff mentors to help students meet their academic, employment, independent living, and personal development goals; (2) common challenge areas related to the mentoring program and dyad partnerships; (3) areas of student growth; and, finally, (4) how impactful the mentoring experience was for faculty and staff mentors. By providing a timely and novel contribution to the mentoring literature, the findings from this study can inform the development of mentoring programs within IPSE settings that will promote positive postsecondary outcomes for students with IDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Practices for Students with Disabilities)
13 pages, 740 KiB  
Article
Providing Access to Reading Comprehension for Greek Secondary Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities
by Georgios Ladias, Georgia Iatraki and Spyridon-Georgios Soulis
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(12), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12120921 - 14 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1160
Abstract
All students should achieve improved outcomes in academic content within general classroom and access information through reading comprehension during their daily interactions. Several adaptations and recommendations should be required for students with intellectual disabilities to access information, such as adapted texts that can [...] Read more.
All students should achieve improved outcomes in academic content within general classroom and access information through reading comprehension during their daily interactions. Several adaptations and recommendations should be required for students with intellectual disabilities to access information, such as adapted texts that can provide access to reading comprehension and help them participate equally in modern society. The current study shows promise for the use of easy to read (EtR) material combined with systematic instruction, task analysis, and prompting in facilitating Greek language lessons for students with mild intellectual disabilities. Researchers used an AB single-subject design to evaluate the effects of transcribed EtR texts for providing access to information regarding grade-aligned reading comprehension in Greek language lessons. Students with mild intellectual disabilities were assessed through baseline and intervention phases and their results showed a correlational relation between the intervention supported by EtR material and the number of students’ correct responses on the comprehension probes. In addition, social validity indicated the teaching intervention through adapted EtR texts as being practical and useful. Discussion of results, future research, and limitations are provided with a focus of the importance of teaching interventions based on EtR language that positively contribute to the accessibility and equality of people with intellectual disabilities to information. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Practices for Students with Disabilities)
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