Transfer of Training in Lifelong Learning Education and Beyond

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 3717

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Applied Pedagogy, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
Interests: training evaluation; transfer of learning; research methods; research competence

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Guest Editor
Department of Methods in Learning Research, University of Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg, Germany
Interests: transfer of training; professional learning; expertise development; professional vision; learner heterogeneity

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Guest Editor
Escola Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa (EUIT), 08221 Terrassa, Spain
Interests: training evaluation; transfer of learning; evidence-based nursing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Training transfer—the degree to which trainees apply what they have learned in training in their workplace—has drawn a lot of attention within the organizational context for the past few decades but little advancement has been made in other contexts. Traditionally, only employees were evaluated in their transfer to the workplace, within their job environment, but transfer of learning processes tend to start earlier in life. Some of them when studying a degree, others while studying a vocational education program, and some others when people feel they need to reinvent themselves and change profession. Thus, training transfer is no longer understood as how employees apply what they learned in training into the workplace but how students (a person who attends a learning activity and learn) transfer their learning (from degree programs, VET courses, and others) to the workplace, which includes not only organizational contexts but placement, internships, or situations in which they put into practice what they learned before. This means that the transfer process does not begin once training finishes but much earlier, usually when students are still in training because they encounter themselves in labor market situations to put into practice what they learn. 

This broader context allows us to set the starting point of transfer of training processes in lifelong learning activities, usually in vocational education or higher education programs, when the student is considered an adult. However, it is not limited to it and goes beyond. Indeed, transfer occurs way before transfer of training literature has been established and does not happen separately from learning but sometimes at the same time. It is important that scientists start to consider other situations and to explore whether the related transfer factors are or act the same as in organizational contexts.

Therefore, this Special Issue entitled “Transfer of training in Lifelong learning Education and Beyond” aims at encouraging scientists, academics, and practitioners to think outside the box of traditional contexts in which transfer of training studies have been developed over the years, such as transfer of VET placements, HE internships, employability courses, as well as refreshing or upgrading competences. This topic relates specifically with the Education Sciences journal because of their aim to contribute to the theory of education by expanding the empirical evidence about transfer of learning in lifelong learning contexts.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and systematic reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but not limited to) the following:

  • Transfer of training as a dynamic and continuous process;
  • Training transfer impact on labor market;
  • Factors that affect transfer of training in lifelong learning activities;
  • Transfer within non-traditional contexts of training;
  • Students’ transfer of training in placements or internships;
  • Transfer of training when a long-training activity (VET programs, university degrees) finishes;
  • Transfer of learning of employability courses;
  • Training transfer of refreshing or upgrading competences.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Carla Quesada-Pallarès
Prof. Dr. Andreas Gegenfurtner
Dr. Helena Roig
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • training transfer
  • lifelong learning
  • transfer environment
  • learning contexts

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 1813 KiB  
Article
Predicting Transfer of Generic Information Literacy Competencies by Non-Traditional Students to Their Study and Work Contexts: A Longitudinal Perspective
by Laurent Testers, Aldin Alijagic, Saskia Brand-Gruwel and Andreas Gegenfurtner
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14020117 - 23 Jan 2024
Viewed by 807
Abstract
Rapid developments in contemporary societies not only ask for lifelong learning but increasingly also for training in generic competencies suitable for multiple contexts and life stages. An indicator of training success is the transfer or application of new learning, a longitudinal process influenced [...] Read more.
Rapid developments in contemporary societies not only ask for lifelong learning but increasingly also for training in generic competencies suitable for multiple contexts and life stages. An indicator of training success is the transfer or application of new learning, a longitudinal process influenced by various theory- and evidence-based factors. The present study combined a multi-contextual and longitudinal approach by investigating non-traditional distance education students’ intention to transfer newly acquired generic information literacy competencies to their study and work contexts before, directly after, and three months after training. Three surveys, using a combination of Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior and Holton et al.’s Learning Transfer System Inventory model, measured the influence of performance outcomes expectations, organizational openness to change, and performance self-efficacy on intention to transfer and transfer behaviour. The participants were 82 adult educational professionals enrolled in an online information literacy course at the Open University. Partial least squares-based structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) confirmed the value of employing a multi-contextual and longitudinal approach within this specific setting. Furthermore, notably, self-efficacy appeared to predict pre-training intention in both study and work contexts and transfer behaviour in the work context. Educational implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transfer of Training in Lifelong Learning Education and Beyond)
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13 pages, 2374 KiB  
Article
Transfer of Learning of New Nursing Professionals: Exploring Patterns and the Effect of Previous Work Experience
by Helena Roig-Ester, Paulina Elizabeth Robalino Guerra, Carla Quesada-Pallarès and Andreas Gegenfurtner
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14010052 - 31 Dec 2023
Viewed by 877
Abstract
While numerous studies have focused on the learning transfer of in-company training in past decades, relatively few have explored the transfer of knowledge from university studies to the workplace, particularly in the context of nursing. Moreover, profile variables tend to be used to [...] Read more.
While numerous studies have focused on the learning transfer of in-company training in past decades, relatively few have explored the transfer of knowledge from university studies to the workplace, particularly in the context of nursing. Moreover, profile variables tend to be used to describe the sample but not to explore its effect on learning transfer. This article explores the effect of previous work experience—in health—on the learning transfer factors model among new nurses during their first year of work. A total of 196 nurses with six months to one year of experience, representing various healthcare services in Catalonia, participated in this study. We administered a 53-item questionnaire based on the Model to Evaluate Transfer in Nursing Professionals. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct groups: Cluster #1 (Academically unprepared with low self-competence), Cluster #2 (Academically unprepared but moderately self-competent), and Cluster #3 (Highly academically prepared and highly self-competent). Nurses in Cluster #3 exhibited a higher degree of learning transfer. However, we also found an interaction between previous work experience and learning transfer. To analyse these interactions, we applied non-traditional analysis techniques, including network analysis, which revealed significant differences between the models with and without work experience. This study highlights the importance of exploring transfer beyond the traditional in-company training context and identifies previous work experiences as one of the key variables that needs to be carefully examined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transfer of Training in Lifelong Learning Education and Beyond)
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24 pages, 796 KiB  
Article
Investigating Transfer Motivation Profiles, Their Antecedents and Transfer of Training
by Bastian de Jong, Joost Jansen in de Wal, Frank Cornelissen and Thea Peetsma
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1232; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121232 - 12 Dec 2023
Viewed by 904
Abstract
Despite investments of companies in employee trainings, transfer of training remains low. One component influencing transfer is transfer motivation. Recent insights have shown that different components of transfer motivation possibly independently influence transfer of training. It is therefore possible that transfer motivation profiles [...] Read more.
Despite investments of companies in employee trainings, transfer of training remains low. One component influencing transfer is transfer motivation. Recent insights have shown that different components of transfer motivation possibly independently influence transfer of training. It is therefore possible that transfer motivation profiles can be distinguished. However, it is unclear whether such motivational profiles exist. In this study, we investigated motivational profiles, how these profiles differ in antecedents influencing transfer motivation and how these profiles differ in transfer intention and transfer of training. This study does so by using the unified model of task-specific motivation (UMTM). Data were collected among 1317 participants who filled in a questionnaire representing the UMTM components directly after the training and indicated transfer after six weeks. Outcomes showed that four transfer motivation profiles could be distinguished, labeled: ‘very optimistic’, ‘moderately optimistic’, ‘personal value’ and ‘conscious’. Moreover, profiles scoring higher on motivational components scored higher on antecedents of transfer motivation, transfer intention and transfer of training. These outcomes suggest that trainings and work circumstances need to be tailored differently toward different trainees to raise their transfer motivation and transfer of training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transfer of Training in Lifelong Learning Education and Beyond)
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