Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education—Series 3

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Higher Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 4910

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology and Education, Universidade Portucalense Infante D. Henrique, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal
Interests: higher education; active learning; student assessment; teacher evaluation; project-based learning (PBL); curriculum development; education management and administration
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Guest Editor
Department of Education and Distance Learning, Universidade Aberta (UAb), 1000-013 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: teacher education; assessment and evaluation in education; project-based learning (PBL); higher education; curriculum development; teacher collaboration
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Guest Editor
CISAS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestão, Instituto Politécnico de Viana do Castelo, 4900-498 Viana do Castelo, Portugal
Interests: higher education development and evaluation; active learning; service-learning; teachers’ development and collaboration; skills development and evaluation; process-based approach
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Education Sciences focuses on research and practice concerning assessment and evaluation in higher education. Based on the assumption that assessment and evaluation are crucial processes for the advancement of higher education, this Special Issue intends to contribute to this line of research.

Recent research on assessment in higher education shows that the most favored assessment methods continue to be examinations within a one-and-only timeframe. Therefore, despite policy recommendations, student assessment continues to be mostly focused on a unique episode and much less aimed at promoting the development of students’ competences, which remain, in most cases, outside of the assessment process. The impact of assessment methods and tasks on students’ learning processes, including their motivation, engagement, and approaches to learning, is an important issue to be discussed. Assessment should be seen as an educational development process, rather than a final outcome or winning post. For these reasons, this Special Issue welcomes submissions regarding the different dimensions and forms of assessment within higher education. This includes topics related to assessment methods (formative and summative), assessment purposes (assessment of/for/as learning), rubrics assessment, and the assessment of learning outcomes (knowledge and skills). In this line of study, we also acknowledge the need to develop research on the assessment of active learning approaches and new pedagogical methodologies, based on student-centered assessment practices, which include, but are not restricted to, self- and peer-assessment and other assessment methods that engage students directly and on their own.

Currently, the challenges, strengths, and opportunities of online and virtual assessment, which were topics already on the research agenda, are now of greater concern due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, with implications for all stakeholders. It is, therefore, relevant and urgent to produce new and alternative forms of assessment, also regarding distance learning, for higher education practitioners and stakeholders.

This Special Issue also understands the need for the continuous improvement, development, and evaluation of higher education institutions (HEI). For this reason, we welcome research on the evaluation of HEI’s organizational management processes, the evaluation of teacher performance, performance appraisal processes, the evaluation of HEI performance, pedagogical innovation in HEIs, curriculum changes, the evaluation of training programs, and the evaluation of institutional and inter-institutional practices of innovation.

Original and unpublished works reporting on empirical studies, research articles, reviews, case studies, and concept papers discussing this topic will be considered for acceptance in this issue. We look forward to your contributions!

Dr. Sandra Raquel Gonçalves Fernandes
Dr. Marta Abelha
Prof. Dr. Ana Teresa Ferreira-Oliveira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 1200 KiB  
Article
Pedagogical Assessment in Higher Education: The Importance of Training
by Isabel Fialho, Marília Cid and Marcelo Coppi
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1248; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121248 - 18 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1366
Abstract
The diversity of students reaching higher education, the skills required of the 21st-century citizen, the Bologna Declaration, and the pressure exerted by international organizations impose a pedagogical reconfiguration of teaching, learning, and assessment through the recognition of the pedagogical dimension as a component [...] Read more.
The diversity of students reaching higher education, the skills required of the 21st-century citizen, the Bologna Declaration, and the pressure exerted by international organizations impose a pedagogical reconfiguration of teaching, learning, and assessment through the recognition of the pedagogical dimension as a component of teacher professional development. We present the results of a study conducted at a university in Portugal with the following objectives: identifying conceptions and practices of pedagogical assessment and determining the influence of pedagogical training on these conceptions and practices. An online questionnaire (pre- and post-test) was administered to 31 teachers who had taken part in a training course on pedagogical assessment. It was found that: nearly half of the teachers experience difficulties in pedagogical assessment, with fairness being the main issue; the most commonly used instruments are written tests, research assignments, and reports; around two-thirds of teachers change the way they assess students, with the nature of the curricular units being the most influential factor in this decision; and there has been a change in the concept of assessment, in which the strict idea of testing, measuring, and classifying students’ knowledge has been replaced by the gathering of information for decision-making about the teaching and learning process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education—Series 3)
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12 pages, 927 KiB  
Article
User Experience of a Mobile App in a City Tour Game for International Doctoral Students
by Margarida M. Marques and Lúcia Pombo
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1221; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121221 - 07 Dec 2023
Viewed by 812
Abstract
Mobile augmented reality games (MARGs) offer exciting possibilities for enriching outdoor learning and enhancing tourism experiences. However, there is a notable gap in understanding the perspectives of doctoral students on these innovative approaches. This paper presents the results of a case study conducted [...] Read more.
Mobile augmented reality games (MARGs) offer exciting possibilities for enriching outdoor learning and enhancing tourism experiences. However, there is a notable gap in understanding the perspectives of doctoral students on these innovative approaches. This paper presents the results of a case study conducted during the 2023 EERA Summer School in Portugal, where PhD students in Education, from universities all around the globe, engaged in a MARG for sustainable development education. Seventy-three students embarked on a walking city tour, whilst playing an interdisciplinary game supported by the EduCITY Smart Learning City Environment. It comprises a web platform, an app, location games, and game creation training. Students experienced the EduCITY app, which guided them through a designated city path encompassing tourist sites, while promoting diverse learning opportunities. At the end, students provided feedback through a short and anonymous evaluation questionnaire, incorporating the user experience questionnaire and one open-ended question for improvement suggestions. This study revealed valuable insights into the doctoral students’ perspectives on the EduCITY app’s user experience, highlighting the strengths of “Attractiveness”, “Stimulation”, and “Novelty”. However, it also identified areas for improvement, particularly in “Dependability” and “Efficiency”. The analysis of the open-ended responses suggested that “Attractiveness” and “Perspicuity”, while not immediate priorities, should be considered in refinement phases as well. As more and more students recognize the importance of MARGs in education, there is a growing need for research in this field, aligning with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Goal 4. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education—Series 3)
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11 pages, 751 KiB  
Article
Enhancing Learning Outcomes in Econometrics: A 12-Year Study
by Seyhan Erden
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(9), 913; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13090913 - 08 Sep 2023
Viewed by 845
Abstract
This paper presents the findings of 12 years of data from studying the teaching of econometrics. The first course on the topic of econometrics has always been a challenging course for both students and instructors. Students come from different quantitative backgrounds, and mostly [...] Read more.
This paper presents the findings of 12 years of data from studying the teaching of econometrics. The first course on the topic of econometrics has always been a challenging course for both students and instructors. Students come from different quantitative backgrounds, and mostly with the prejudice that this is one of the most challenging courses in their academic career. We showed that using Classroom Response Systems (CRSs) such as polls closes the achievement gap between students from higher and lower quantitative levels. Besides students’ performance, we also investigated instructor performance through teaching and course evaluations utilizing data from 38 classes over the course of 12 years. We showed that the instructor performance is higher under the in-class modality compared to the online modality and showed that this gap in performance between the two modalities widens as students’ grades improve; a positive association between grades and instructor performance under the in-class modality exists; however, the association is negative under the online modality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education—Series 3)
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21 pages, 6269 KiB  
Article
Investigation of Progressive Learning within a Statics Course: An Analysis of Performance Retention, Critical Topics, and Active Participation
by Naveed Ahmed, JeeWoong Park, Cristian Arteaga and Haroon Stephen
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(6), 576; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13060576 - 02 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1092
Abstract
Previous research has demonstrated a link between prior knowledge and student success in engineering courses. However, while course-to-course relations exist, researchers have paid insufficient attention to internal course performance development. This study aims to address this gap—designed to quantify and thus extract meaningful [...] Read more.
Previous research has demonstrated a link between prior knowledge and student success in engineering courses. However, while course-to-course relations exist, researchers have paid insufficient attention to internal course performance development. This study aims to address this gap—designed to quantify and thus extract meaningful insights—by examining a fundamental engineering course, Statics, from three perspectives: (1) progressive learning reflected in performance retention throughout the course; (2) critical topics and their influence on students’ performance progression; and (3) student active participation as a surrogate measure of progressive learning. By analyzing data collected from 222 students over five semesters, this study draws insights on student in-course progressive learning. The results show that early learning had significant implications in building a foundation in progressive learning throughout the semester. Additionally, insufficient knowledge on certain topics can hinder student learning progression more than others, which eventually leads to course failure. Finally, student participation is a pathway to enhance learning and achieve excellent course performance. The presented analysis approach provides educators with a mechanism for diagnosing and devising strategies to address conceptual lapses for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses, especially where progressive learning is essential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education—Series 3)
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