Digital Advancement and Education

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Technology Enhanced Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 May 2024 | Viewed by 4989

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department for Teaching Social Science and Communication, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 5290002, Israel
2. Academic Department of Education, Achva Academic College, Arugot 7980400, Israel
Interests: the effect of ICT on children, adolescents and youth, including new immigrants; characteristics of use in digital environments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

What characterizes members of Generations Z and Alpha? What do they like and how do they prefer to learn? What media do they use and what teaching methods are best suited for them?

Members of Generation Z were born during the period between the last years of the previous century and the beginning of the 21st century (until 2010), and members of the Generation Alpha were born after 2010.

They are considered "digital natives." They live and behave naturally within a digital environment, and a digital presence surrounds all areas of their lives.

The purpose of the Special Issue is to characterize members of Generations Z and Alpha aged 5–18 years. The Special Issue will discuss issues related to the digital advancement and education Generation Z and Alpha members, including topics such as:

  • Digital literacy;
  • Information consumption in general and visual information consumption in particular;
  • Media consumption and media use habits;
  • Ways of learning;
  • Convenience and digital immediacy in everyday life;
  • Digital games;
  • Global social relations across geographic and cultural boundaries;
  • Local and global characteristics in their lives;
  • Leisure habits;
  • Decision-making processes;
  • Friends and friendship in gaming and educational digital environments;
  • Digital natives in kindergartens and in schools.

Articles presenting empirical data will be accepted, including quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method studies. No theoretical studies or literature reviews will be accepted. An abstract of up to 250 words must be submitted by 30 November 2023. The abstract should include five keywords, the aim, background, methodology and findings. After receiving approval for submission of the article, the complete manuscript must be submitted by 1 May 2024. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website. Articles should be 4000 to 8000 words in length and follow the ACS referencing style according to the journal’s style requirements.

Dr. Gila Cohen Zilka
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Alpha generation
  • generation Z
  • identity
  • interaction
  • wellbeing
  • information and communication technology (ICT)
  • digital environment
  • lifelong learning
  • teaching/learning strategies
  • 21st century skills
  • social emotional learning (SEL)

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

17 pages, 1285 KiB  
Article
Smartphones at School: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Educators’ and Students’ Perspectives on Mobile Phone Use at School
by Megan E. Gath, Lauren Monk, Amy Scott and Gail T. Gillon
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 351; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14040351 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1264
Abstract
As smartphone ownership and use by children and youth has increased over the past decade, so has the presence of phones within the classroom. This has created unique challenges for teachers, school leaders, and policymakers. In this research study, we used a cross-sectional [...] Read more.
As smartphone ownership and use by children and youth has increased over the past decade, so has the presence of phones within the classroom. This has created unique challenges for teachers, school leaders, and policymakers. In this research study, we used a cross-sectional survey design to examine educator (n = 217) and student (n = 332) perspectives on students’ mobile phone use in New Zealand schools through a mixed-methods approach. The results indicate that both educators and students were in favour of regulating students’ phone use at the school level, but they were less in favour of a total ban approach. Most participants thought that students should not be allowed to have phones during class time, with rationale that centred around student learning and safety. Mobile phones were viewed as a distraction to student learning and compromised student safety through inappropriate use (e.g., photos and videos being taken at school and shared), cyberbullying, and social media-related issues. The findings of our research provide insights that are relevant to the development of educational policies around students’ mobile phone use at school and contribute to a broader understanding of the impacts of mobile phone use at school on child and youth achievement and well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Advancement and Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

37 pages, 5554 KiB  
Article
Proof of Concept for a Novel Social-Emotional Learning Programming: The B.E. M.Y. F.R.I.E.N.D. Framework
by Ewelina Maria Swierad and Olajide Williams
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1250; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121250 - 18 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1311
Abstract
Despite the known benefits of social-emotional learning (SEL) for children, evidence-based, culturally sensitive, and multisensory SEL programs are limited. To address existing challenges in SEL for underprivileged youth, we developed the multicomponent B.E. M.Y. F.R.I.E.N.D. (BMF) framework that capitalizes on (1) cultural tailoring [...] Read more.
Despite the known benefits of social-emotional learning (SEL) for children, evidence-based, culturally sensitive, and multisensory SEL programs are limited. To address existing challenges in SEL for underprivileged youth, we developed the multicomponent B.E. M.Y. F.R.I.E.N.D. (BMF) framework that capitalizes on (1) cultural tailoring to foster acceptability, (2) tools and strategies to build healthy habits, (3) parental engagement using the Child-Mediated Health Communication Model, (4) social engagement of teachers via peer interaction during learning experiences, and (5) multisensory learning. Each letter (component) of the BMF stands for a unique SEL skill. To test the BMF framework, we developed a proof of concept (POC) focused on one component of the BMF—mindfulness and gratitude SEL (M-letter). The POC includes a description of immersive and interactive multimedia modules with tailor-made music, digital games, cartoons, and booster activities. The outcomes from the POC will inform the development of fully powered randomized studies of each component of BMF and, ultimately, the implementation and dissemination of the entire BMF program. The Multisensory Multilevel Health Education Model (MMHEM) guided the design of the program. In the POC, we used a learning management system (LMS) platform to facilitate program scalability. The modules encompassed culturally and age-relevant real-world examples and were digitized and integrated with traditional learning approaches. This article presents qualitative and quantitative data evaluating feasibility, preliminary acceptability, and preliminary outcomes from the mindfulness and gratitude modules (letter “M” of the BMF). The studies were conducted with 4th and 5th-grade students (Studies 2–4) attending a New York City public school-affiliated after-school program in the Bronx and Queens and their teachers (Study 1). Study #1 presents the focus group data on teachers and principals; Study #2 shows the focus group data on minoritized students; Study #3 presents data from the pilot testing of study-specific outcome measures; and Study #4 presents data on the preliminary efficacy of the BMF mindfulness and gratitude modules using a within-subjects repeated measures pre-posttest study design. Results suggest that the “M” component (mindfulness and gratitude) of the BMF framework is feasible and highly engaging among minoritized children, with high acceptability among teachers and students. We also found a positive impact of the intervention on measures of gratitude and life satisfaction (preliminary efficacy). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Advancement and Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

20 pages, 3186 KiB  
Systematic Review
Digital and Information Literacy in Basic-Education Teachers: A Systematic Literature Review
by Fiorela Fernández-Otoya, Julio Cabero-Almenara, Gerber Pérez-Postigo, Jessie Bravo, Manuel Alfredo Alcázar-Holguin and Mauricio Vilca-Rodríguez
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14020127 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 2076
Abstract
Digital transformation has become constant and has forced governments to reevaluate the validity of their educational models; therefore, regarding digital and information literacy, to train teachers to improve new digital skills becomes essential. For these reasons, this research will explore the instruction of [...] Read more.
Digital transformation has become constant and has forced governments to reevaluate the validity of their educational models; therefore, regarding digital and information literacy, to train teachers to improve new digital skills becomes essential. For these reasons, this research will explore the instruction of teachers in digital and information literacy in basic education; likewise, there will be an observation of the research’s theoretical-methodological characteristics related to these variables, and, also, we will carry out an analysis of the most pertinent contributions on the impact of new literacies and competencies in the teaching–learning processes in basic education, with the purpose of obtaining a current state overview of its teacher training within the framework of the technologies’ usage linked to teaching. This review was based on the guidelines of the PRISMA protocol, and to select 56 documents, the Scopus and Web of Science (WoS) databases were used. The results show that, in the Scopus database, Spain is the country with the most research on the subject, with 29% of the total, followed by Indonesia, with 6%, and the United States, with 4%, and that the articles focus mainly on the social sciences and computer science. Likewise, in WoS, the country with the most research on the subject is Spain, with 30%, followed by Russia, with 10%, and Norway, with 8%, and the articles mainly revolve around the categories of education and communication. The research related to this topic uses a quantitative approach in 68%, a qualitative approach in 25% and a mixed approach in 7%. It was shown that there is a direct relationship between digital and information literacy and digital competency. In addition, it is also emphasized that digital and information literacy are continuous and long-term processes. More didactic proposals on digital skills would be necessary, over government policies and efforts, to achieve a community with a high level of digital and information literacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Advancement and Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop