Creating the Future of Teaching and Teacher Education – Innovative Disruption as a Catalyst for Reform

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 16541

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Education and Professional Studies, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, QLD 4222, Australia
Interests: education transformation and efficacy, with a focus on professional teacher education and school reform
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Education and Professional Studies, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4222, Australia
Interests: early childhood teacher education; teacher self efficacy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are interested to bring together researchers working in the space of evidence-based practice where innovative disruption has occurred and providing the opportunity for authors to explore how, if desired, these shifts may be sustained to shape the future in the field of teaching and/or teacher education. Alternatively, authors may wish to argue why the innovation is not to be sustained.  In both instances, evidence should be provided to tell this story. Of particular interest is innovative work in social and emotional wellbeing, digital practices, and relational trust building with key collaborators in teacher education. We are interested in reforms that have the potential to reshape and lead thinking in the teaching and/or teacher education space, and hence meet the criterion of being an innovative disruption.

We are interested in new directions that may be a direct consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic; however, we are not limiting this Special Issue to that catalyst. However, it is undeniable that teaching and teacher education has not been immune to the effects of the COVID pandemic, with many examples of adaptability and rapid responses to enable initial and professional teacher education to continue.  This might be seen as an acceleration of some initiatives that were formerly in the distance, or entirely new ways of going about aspects of teaching and/or teacher education.

This Special Issue will bring together researchers with a focus on reform and innovation, and offer hope and inspiration for the profession.

The aims of this Special Issue are to:

  • Examine evidence-based instances of innovative disruption framed in appropriate theoretical and methodological research paradigms that have led to reform in teaching and/or teacher education.
  • Examine how this disruption has led to change and the potential for sustainable reform that will shape the future.

Possible themes related to teaching/teacher education:

  • Digital disruption and innovations
  • Social and emotional wellbeing strategies and practices
  • Building collaborations and partnerships
  • Rethinking policies and practices
  • Rethinking classrooms and industrial models
  • Other innovations

In this Special Issue, original research articles and systematic quantitative literature reviews are welcome.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Donna Pendergast
Prof. Dr. Susanne Garvis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • innovative disruption
  • school reform
  • teacher education

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 563 KiB  
Article
Developing a Project-Based Learning Course Model Combined with the Think–Pair–Share Strategy to Enhance Creative Thinking Skills in Education Students
by Meng-Meng Li and Chia-Ching Tu
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030233 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1131
Abstract
The aim of this research was to produce a project-based learning (PjBL) course model that combines with the Think–Pair–Share (TPS) strategy and to determine its effectiveness in improving the creative thinking skills of education students. The sample of participants comprised 100 students from [...] Read more.
The aim of this research was to produce a project-based learning (PjBL) course model that combines with the Think–Pair–Share (TPS) strategy and to determine its effectiveness in improving the creative thinking skills of education students. The sample of participants comprised 100 students from a university in Bangkok, Thailand. Five main elements comprised the PjBL-TPS course: 1. Project Preparation (including an introduction, pairs formation, and an understanding of the project); 2. Project Pair Cooperation (including discussion, knowledge framework development in pairs, practice analysis, brainstorming, and pair feedback); 3. Project Production (including its development, testing, refinement, and presentation); 4. Project Evaluation (including giving feedback on the work of the other pairs); and 5. Project Conclusion (including reflecting on the overall experience of the project). The results show that, in their post-course exercises, the students displayed enhanced creativity in all areas of creative skills (involving fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration). The experimental group demonstrated significantly higher creativity levels compared to the control group. In addition, the post-course assessments of the self-perceived creativity improvements of the students revealed that, post-course, most of the students perceived improvements in every aspect of their creativity. Full article
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20 pages, 1693 KiB  
Article
“Teachers Are Rock Stars!” Rethinking Teaching and Teacher Education in a Post-Pandemic World: Innovative Disruption and Silver Linings
by Donna Pendergast and Mia O’Brien
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 685; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13070685 - 5 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3179
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic amplified a pre-existing global education crisis. As teachers and systems alike have pivoted to keep the education of the next generation underway, the liminal space between normal and the new normal has provided the opportunity for innovative disruption and transformation [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic amplified a pre-existing global education crisis. As teachers and systems alike have pivoted to keep the education of the next generation underway, the liminal space between normal and the new normal has provided the opportunity for innovative disruption and transformation to confront the status quo in ways that were previously unimaginable. It is in this space of possibility, in mid-2022, that 466 education stakeholders including teachers, academics, system leaders, and university students explored the idea of rethinking teaching and teacher education in a post-pandemic world. The participants of the study responded to a series of five questions about impact, spaces for transformation, and possible legacies. Inductive qualitative coding was employed to generate themes from the responses, and polling used to determine the frequency of agreement followed. Among the findings were insights into their experiences and the spaces for innovative disruption, with three areas most notable: the opportunity for valuing teachers’ expertise, noting their ‘rock star’ status during the lockdown phase of the pandemic; the need to focus on student and teacher wellbeing, equity and diversity; and the opportunity to innovate for enhanced flexibility for work structures, learning and connecting beyond the classroom. Full article
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15 pages, 766 KiB  
Article
Developing and Validating a Scale for University Teacher’s Caring Behavior in Online Teaching
by Jing Zhao, Ling Zhang and Xiangquan Yao
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(3), 300; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13030300 - 13 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2122
Abstract
Teacher caring behavior in higher education has been frequently studied in the context of face-to-face instruction. The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed the territory of high education such that synchronous or asynchronous online instruction has become an important component of college students’ learning experience. [...] Read more.
Teacher caring behavior in higher education has been frequently studied in the context of face-to-face instruction. The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed the territory of high education such that synchronous or asynchronous online instruction has become an important component of college students’ learning experience. The lack of valid and reliable scales makes it difficult to quantitatively examine teachers’ caring behavior in online contexts. Building on existing literature, we designed and implemented a three-stage study that aimed to develop and validate a scale for measuring Chinese university teachers’ online caring behavior from students’ perspectives. Results from data analysis have shown that the scale has construct validity and internal consistency reliability. The scale has revealed that teacher caring behavior in an online context consists of three latent factors, namely, inclusiveness, support, and conscientiousness. This is consistent with the existing conceptualization of teacher care as a three-dimensional construct. The scale made targeted improvement of existing scales and can be used to quantitatively examine the relationship between teachers’ caring behavior and students’ academic performance, learning motivation, learning engagement, learning self-efficacy, sense of belonging, and mental health. Full article
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17 pages, 320 KiB  
Article
Teacher Motivation to Teach in Challenging School Contexts on the Cape Flats, Western Cape, South Africa
by Desiré Christian and Yusuf Sayed
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(2), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13020165 - 3 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3633
Abstract
This study emerged from a desire to understand the motivation of teachers to teach in challenging school contexts on the Cape Flats of South Africa where the legacy of apartheid continues to impact the quality of teaching and learning as the communities experience [...] Read more.
This study emerged from a desire to understand the motivation of teachers to teach in challenging school contexts on the Cape Flats of South Africa where the legacy of apartheid continues to impact the quality of teaching and learning as the communities experience abject poverty, violence, and gang activity and have little regard for schooling, teachers, or education. This qualitative study employed an interpretative paradigm to understand the personal, lived experiences of teachers teaching in three purposively selected primary schools in Manenberg on the Cape Flats. The participants agreed to at least one semi-structured interview with follow-up questions for clarity if required. The findings suggest that the motivation of the teachers to teach at schools in a marginalised community is positively linked to the relationships they develop with their teacher community and the students and their families. If these relationships are positive, teachers are able to live out their beliefs and remain committed to the school community, which increases their perceived levels of self-efficacy and therefore their motivation to teach in the Manenberg area. Where they have support from the larger school community, their motivation is further enhanced. This motivation can be applied to countries with marginalised communities, particularly countries in the global south. Full article

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15 pages, 576 KiB  
Systematic Review
Teacher Educator Wellbeing, Stress and Burnout: A Scoping Review
by Kristina Turner and Susanne Garvis
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(4), 351; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13040351 - 28 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5467
Abstract
Research reveals that due to the intensifying demands of higher education work environments, academic staff are reporting increased levels of burnout and stress and decreasing wellbeing. Teacher educators are academic staff who are involved with teaching and research in the field of Initial [...] Read more.
Research reveals that due to the intensifying demands of higher education work environments, academic staff are reporting increased levels of burnout and stress and decreasing wellbeing. Teacher educators are academic staff who are involved with teaching and research in the field of Initial Teacher Education (ITE). This scoping review aimed to draw together research about teacher educator wellbeing, stress and burnout, and to identify where there are gaps in evidence-based knowledge. This study revealed that teacher educator wellbeing, stress and burnout is a relatively new and under-researched area, and that there is a dearth of current evidence-based literature in this field. As a result of this finding, it is recommended that extensive qualitative and quantitative research be conducted to better understand teacher educator wellbeing, stress and burnout. It is hoped that this scoping review will drive innovation and reform in ITE by identifying what is known and unknown in the field, thus informing future research to better support teacher educator wellbeing. Full article
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