Faunistical and Ecological Studies on Carabid Beetles

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021) | Viewed by 13316

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Department of Ecology, University of Debrecen, H-4032 Debrecen, Hungary
Interests: community ecology; conservation biology; urban ecology; forest ecology; agroecology; biodiversity; ecosystem services
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are one of the best-known taxa in entomology. They are common in most terrestrial habitats and geographical areas and can easily be collected using standard methods. Taxonomy, phylogeny, geographic distribution, habitat associations, and ecological requirements of carabid species are well known. Based on the above, carabids are often used as model organisms in faunistical and ecological studies. For this Special Issue I invite the submission of high-quality original research papers and reviews covering all aspects of carabid faunistic and ecology.

Prof. Tibor Magura
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Taxonmy
  • Faunistic
  • Biogeography
  • Ecology
  • Biodiversity
  • Community
  • Axonomic diversity
  • Genetic diversity
  • Functional diversity
  • Phylogenetic diversity
  • Ecosystem services
  • Ecological process

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 1051 KiB  
Article
Unequivocal Differences in Predation Pressure on Large Carabid Beetles between Forestry Treatments
Diversity 2021, 13(10), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13100484 - 03 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1654
Abstract
Carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are considered as one of the most cardinal invertebrate predatory groups in many ecosystems, including forests. Previous studies revealed that the predation pressure provided by carabids significantly regulates the ecological network of invertebrates. Nevertheless, there is no direct estimation [...] Read more.
Carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are considered as one of the most cardinal invertebrate predatory groups in many ecosystems, including forests. Previous studies revealed that the predation pressure provided by carabids significantly regulates the ecological network of invertebrates. Nevertheless, there is no direct estimation of the predation risk on carabids, which can be an important proxy for the phenomenon called ecological trap. In our study, we aimed to explore the predation pressure on carabids using 3D-printed decoys installed in two types of forestry treatments, preparation cuts and clear cuts, and control plots in a Hungarian oak–hornbeam forest. We estimated the seasonal, diurnal and treatment-specific aspects of the predation pressure on carabids. Our results reveal a significantly higher predation risk on carabids in both forestry treatments than in the control. Moreover, it was also higher in the nighttime than daytime. Contrarily, no effects of season and microhabitat features were found. Based on these clues we assume that habitats modified by forestry practices may act as an ecological trap for carabids. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of how ecological interactions between species may change in a modified forest environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Faunistical and Ecological Studies on Carabid Beetles)
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11 pages, 2201 KiB  
Article
Habitat and Landform Types Drive the Distribution of Carabid Beetles at High Altitudes
Diversity 2021, 13(4), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13040142 - 26 Mar 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1806
Abstract
The high altitude mountain slopes of the Dolomites (Italian Alps) are characterized by great habitat and landform heterogeneities. In this paper, we investigated the effect of Nature 2000 habitat and landform types in driving the high altitude ground beetle (Carabidae) distribution in the [...] Read more.
The high altitude mountain slopes of the Dolomites (Italian Alps) are characterized by great habitat and landform heterogeneities. In this paper, we investigated the effect of Nature 2000 habitat and landform types in driving the high altitude ground beetle (Carabidae) distribution in the Western Dolomites (Brenta group, Italy). We studied the carabid assemblages collected in 55 sampling points distributed in four Nature 2000 habitat types and four landform types located between 1860 and 2890 m above sea level (a.s.l.). Twenty-two species, half of them Alpine endemics, were sampled. Species richness and taxonomic distinctness did not show any significant difference among habitat types; conversely, these differences became significant when the landform type was considered. Total activity density and the frequency of brachypterous, endemic and predatory species showed significant differences between both habitat and landform types. Indicator species analysis identified twelve species linked to a specific habitat type and thirteen species linked to a specific landform type. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that altitude and vegetation cover drove the species distribution in each habitat and landform type while the aspect had a weak effect. Our results highlight the need for a geomorphological characterization of the sampling points when high altitude ground-dwelling arthropods are investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Faunistical and Ecological Studies on Carabid Beetles)
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24 pages, 2881 KiB  
Article
Effects of Pure and Mixed Pine and Oak Forest Stands on Carabid Beetles
Diversity 2021, 13(3), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13030127 - 17 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3668
Abstract
The multiple-use approach to forestry applied in Germany aims to combine timber production and habitat management by preserving specific stand structures. We selected four forest stand types comprising (i) pure oak, (ii) equal oak–pine mixtures, (iii) single tree admixtures of oak in pine [...] Read more.
The multiple-use approach to forestry applied in Germany aims to combine timber production and habitat management by preserving specific stand structures. We selected four forest stand types comprising (i) pure oak, (ii) equal oak–pine mixtures, (iii) single tree admixtures of oak in pine forest and (iv) pure pine. We analysed the effects of stand composition parameters on species representative of the larger carabid beetles (Carabus arvensis, C. coriaceus, C. hortensis, C. violaceus, Calosoma inquisitor). The main statistical methods used were correlation analyses and generalised linear mixed models. Cal. inquisitor was observed in pure oak forests exclusively. C. coriaceus and C. hortensis were absent from pure pine stands. High activity densities of C. arvensis and C. violaceus were observed in all four forest types. When assessed at the smaller scales of species crown cover proportions and spatial tree species effect zones, C. hortensis was found to be positively related to oak trees with a regular spatial distribution, whereas C. coriaceus preferred lower and more aggregated oak tree proportions. C. violaceus showed strong sex-specific tree species affinities. Information about preferences of carabid beetles is necessary for management activities targeting the adaptation of forest structures to habitat requirements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Faunistical and Ecological Studies on Carabid Beetles)
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9 pages, 455 KiB  
Article
The Permeability of Natural versus Anthropogenic Forest Edges Modulates the Abundance of Ground Beetles of Different Dispersal Power and Habitat Affinity
Diversity 2020, 12(9), 320; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090320 - 21 Aug 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2360
Abstract
Forest edges are formed by natural or anthropogenic processes and their maintaining processes cause fundamentally different edge responses. We evaluated the published evidence on the effect of various edges on the abundance of ground beetles of different habitat affinity and dispersal power. Our [...] Read more.
Forest edges are formed by natural or anthropogenic processes and their maintaining processes cause fundamentally different edge responses. We evaluated the published evidence on the effect of various edges on the abundance of ground beetles of different habitat affinity and dispersal power. Our results, based on 23 publications and 86 species, showed that natural forest edges were impenetrable for open-habitat species with high dispersal power, preventing their influx into the forest interiors, while forest specialist species of limited dispersal power penetrated and reached abundances comparable to those in forest interiors. Anthropogenic edges, maintained by continued disturbance were permeable by macropterous open-habitat species, allowing them to invade the forest interiors, while such edges (except the forestry-induced ones) deterred brachypterous forest specialists. Different permeability of forest edges with various maintaining processes can affect ecosystem functions and services, therefore the preservation and restoration of natural forest edges are key issues in both forest ecology and nature conservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Faunistical and Ecological Studies on Carabid Beetles)
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12 pages, 1398 KiB  
Article
Trait-Specific Responses of Carabid Beetle Diversity and Composition in Pinus densiflora Forests Compared to Broad-Leaved Deciduous Forests in a Temperate Region
Diversity 2020, 12(7), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12070275 - 09 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2598
Abstract
Since successful reforestation after the 1970s, Korean red pine (Pinus densiflora) forests have become the most important coniferous forests in Korea. However, the scarcity of evidence for biodiversity responses hinders understanding of the conservation value of Korean red pine forests. This [...] Read more.
Since successful reforestation after the 1970s, Korean red pine (Pinus densiflora) forests have become the most important coniferous forests in Korea. However, the scarcity of evidence for biodiversity responses hinders understanding of the conservation value of Korean red pine forests. This study was conducted to explore the patterns of carabid beetle diversity and assemblage structures between broad-leaved deciduous forests and P. densiflora forests in the temperate region of central Korea. Carabid beetles were sampled by pitfall trapping from 2013 to 2014. A total of 66 species were identified from 9541 carabid beetles. Species richness in broad-leaved deciduous forests was significantly higher than that in pine forests. In addition, the species composition of carabid beetles in broad-leaved deciduous forests differed from that of P. densiflora forests. More endemic, brachypterous, forest specialists, and carnivorous species were distributed in broad-leaved deciduous forests than in P. densiflora forests. Consequently, carabid beetle assemblages in central Korea are distinctively divided by forest type based on ecological and biological traits (e.g., endemisim, habitat types, wing forms, and feeding guilds). However, possible variation of the response of beetle communities to the growth of P. densiflora forests needs to be considered for forest management based on biodiversity conservation in temperate regions, because conifer plantations in this study are still young, i.e., approximately 30–40-years old. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Faunistical and Ecological Studies on Carabid Beetles)
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