Biological Invasions in a Changing World (NEOBIOTA 2022)

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity Loss & Dynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2023) | Viewed by 9949

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department of Biodiversity and Nature Tourism, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 5, 51006 Tartu, Estonia
Interests: population biology of threatened species; conservation biology; distribution ecology; nature tourism; orchid ecology; plant ecology
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Guest Editor
Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, 12618 Tallinn, Estonia
Interests: patterns, dynamic and processes of coastal ecosystems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biological invasions are one of the main direct drivers of biodiversity loss worldwide. They pose a rapidly growing threat to biodiversity, ecosystem services, sustainable development, and human wellbeing. The challenge of halting biodiversity loss and facing this problem is more and more critical in the context of climate change and current geopolitical problems. The newest scientific and practical findings regarding all kinds of biological invasions will be discussed in the next NEOBIOTA conference, “2nd International Conference on Biological Invasions: Biological Invasions in a Changing World”, being held in Tartu, Estonia, 12–16 September 2022.

The authors of selected papers presented at the conference are invited to submit extended versions to this Special Issue of the journal Diversity after the conference. Submitted papers should be extended to the size of regular research or review articles, with at least a 50% extension of new results. All submitted papers will undergo the journal’s standard peer review procedure. Accepted papers will be published in open-access format in Diversity and collected together in the Special Issue website. There are no page limitations for this journal.

Prof. Dr. Tiiu Kull
Prof. Dr. Jonne Kotta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 171 KiB  
Editorial
Biological Invasions in a Changing World: Introduction to the Special Issue
by Jonne Kotta
Diversity 2023, 15(8), 891; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15080891 - 28 Jul 2023
Viewed by 553
Abstract
Welcome to the Special Issue of the NEOBIOTA Conference Scientific Papers entitled “Biological Invasions in a Changing World” [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions in a Changing World (NEOBIOTA 2022))

Research

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13 pages, 1577 KiB  
Article
Effects of an Invasive Mud Crab on a Macroalgae-Dominated Habitat of the Baltic Sea under Different Temperature Regimes
by Imtiyaz B. Beleem, Jonne Kotta and Francisco R. Barboza
Diversity 2023, 15(5), 644; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15050644 - 09 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1425
Abstract
The risks imposed by biological invasions on marine ecosystems are increasing worldwide. The mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii has recently expanded its distribution to the northeastern Baltic Sea, where low predatory pressures and the absence of functionally similar competitors favored the establishment of the [...] Read more.
The risks imposed by biological invasions on marine ecosystems are increasing worldwide. The mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii has recently expanded its distribution to the northeastern Baltic Sea, where low predatory pressures and the absence of functionally similar competitors favored the establishment of the species. Few studies have addressed the effects of the mud crab on Baltic benthic communities and habitats. Even fewer have looked at the consequences of the invader on habitats dominated by Fucus vesiculosus, the main habitat-forming macrophyte in the Baltic Sea. The present study experimentally analyzed, under laboratory conditions, the effects of R. harrisii on Baltic F. vesiculosus habitats and associated communities under different temperatures simulating summer and winter regimes. Our results show that the effects of the mud crab are modulated by temperature, being more pronounced under summer conditions when the metabolic demands and food intake requirements are higher. The experiment provided new insights into the capacity of R. harrisii to disrupt recruitment in native snail populations, jeopardizing the persistence of healthy populations of key grazers in F. vesiculosus habitats. Moreover, our results conclusively demonstrated the capacity of the invader to decimate native blue mussel populations. The impacts on functionally relevant invertebrates can have far-reaching ecological consequences, altering the food web and disrupting entire coastal ecosystems in the Baltic Sea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions in a Changing World (NEOBIOTA 2022))
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11 pages, 1036 KiB  
Article
Prioritizing Management of Invasive Alien Species of EU Concern—A Northern Perspective
by Miia Jauni, Erja Huusela, Lauri Urho and Terho Hyvönen
Diversity 2023, 15(5), 585; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15050585 - 22 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1424
Abstract
Invasive alien species (IAS) represent one of the major threats to biodiversity globally. Each member state in the EU is required to compile a management plan for IAS of Union concern. This requires risk assessments to prioritize management measures consistent with the requirements [...] Read more.
Invasive alien species (IAS) represent one of the major threats to biodiversity globally. Each member state in the EU is required to compile a management plan for IAS of Union concern. This requires risk assessments to prioritize management measures consistent with the requirements of each EU member state. Here, we review the management priorities for the 88 IAS of Union concern based on the risk assessment scheme developed for Finland. Of 88 species, 52 had not been detected in Finland and 51 species were categorized as species that fail to succeed in Finland. Climatic conditions can be regarded as a major factor limiting the success of those species. Five primary management categories were recognized. Monitoring was deemed the primary management option for 30 species, prevention of entry into Finland for 30 species, prevention of escape into nature for 17 species, prevention of further spread and/or the management of areas with high biodiversity value for 4 species and eradication for 7 species. It is concluded that national management plans should consider local environmental conditions and adjust management options according to national risk assessments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions in a Changing World (NEOBIOTA 2022))
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13 pages, 14643 KiB  
Article
Quantifying Invasive Pest Dynamics through Inference of a Two-Node Epidemic Network Model
by Laura E. Wadkin, Andrew Golightly, Julia Branson, Andrew Hoppit, Nick G. Parker and Andrew W. Baggaley
Diversity 2023, 15(4), 496; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15040496 - 28 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1115
Abstract
Invasive woodland pests have substantial ecological, economic, and social impacts, harming biodiversity and ecosystem services. Mathematical modelling informed by Bayesian inference can deepen our understanding of the fundamental behaviours of invasive pests and provide predictive tools for forecasting future spread. A key invasive [...] Read more.
Invasive woodland pests have substantial ecological, economic, and social impacts, harming biodiversity and ecosystem services. Mathematical modelling informed by Bayesian inference can deepen our understanding of the fundamental behaviours of invasive pests and provide predictive tools for forecasting future spread. A key invasive pest of concern in the UK is the oak processionary moth (OPM). OPM was established in the UK in 2006; it is harmful to both oak trees and humans, and its infestation area is continually expanding. Here, we use a computational inference scheme to estimate the parameters for a two-node network epidemic model to describe the temporal dynamics of OPM in two geographically neighbouring parks (Bushy Park and Richmond Park, London). We show the applicability of such a network model to describing invasive pest dynamics and our results suggest that the infestation within Richmond Park has largely driven the infestation within Bushy Park. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions in a Changing World (NEOBIOTA 2022))
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16 pages, 2809 KiB  
Article
Distribution of Non-Indigenous Crayfish Species in Estonia and Their Impacts on Noble Crayfish (Astacus astacus L.) Populations
by Michael Oliewo Aluma, Lilian Pukk, Margo Hurt and Katrin Kaldre
Diversity 2023, 15(4), 474; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15040474 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1291
Abstract
Invasive non-indigenous crayfish species (NICS) are a major threat to the existence of native crayfish populations in European freshwater ecosystems. The discovery of signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus, marbled crayfish Procambarus virginalis, and spiny-cheek crayfish Faxonius limosus in Estonia has increased the [...] Read more.
Invasive non-indigenous crayfish species (NICS) are a major threat to the existence of native crayfish populations in European freshwater ecosystems. The discovery of signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus, marbled crayfish Procambarus virginalis, and spiny-cheek crayfish Faxonius limosus in Estonia has increased the risk of extinction of Estonia’s only native crayfish species, the noble crayfish Astacus astacus. The aim of this study was to give an overview of the status, distribution, and impacts of P. leniusculus, F. limosus, and Procambarus virginalis on A. astacus populations and assess the effect of trapping on NICS abundance. Annual monitoring of crayfish has been carried out since 2008 as part of A. astacus conservation and the NICS eradication plan. In this study, we present data from nine sampling locations monitored from 2010 to 2022. The spread of NICS continues to increase beyond their distribution areas, and in two sampling locations P. leniusculus and A. astacus live in sympatry. Our results suggest that trapping has a limited effect on population abundance, as NICS have already caused the extinction of two A. astacus populations. However, intensive trapping should continue simultaneously with sensitive molecular techniques to monitor the spread of NICS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions in a Changing World (NEOBIOTA 2022))
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20 pages, 2162 KiB  
Article
Ionome of Lithuanian Populations of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) and Its Relation to Genetic Diversity and Environmental Variables
by Edvina Krokaitė, Lina Jocienė, Dinara Shakeneva, Tomas Rekašius, Darius Valiulis and Eugenija Kupčinskienė
Diversity 2023, 15(3), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15030418 - 13 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1318
Abstract
Fifteen riparian populations of Lithuanian Lythrum salicaria were assessed for leaf macronutrient, micronutrient and non-essential element concentrations and compared to the former obtained molecular data at amplified fragment length polymorphism (PLP.AFLP) loci. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to profile the contents [...] Read more.
Fifteen riparian populations of Lithuanian Lythrum salicaria were assessed for leaf macronutrient, micronutrient and non-essential element concentrations and compared to the former obtained molecular data at amplified fragment length polymorphism (PLP.AFLP) loci. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to profile the contents of 12 elements in the leaves. The leaf nutrient concentrations were within normal ranges for growth and development and heavy metal concentrations did not reach toxic levels. The concentrations of macroelements such as nitrogen, potassium, calcium and magnesium were in the range of 23,790–38,183; 7327–11,732; 7018–12,306; and 1377–3183 µg/g dry mass (d. m.), respectively; the concentrations of micronutrients such as sodium, iron, zinc and copper varied in the ranges of 536–6328; 24.7–167.1; 10.88–26.24; and 3.72–5.30 µg/g d. m., respectively, and the concentrations of non-essential elements such as lead, nickel, chromium, and cadmium were in the intervals of 0.136–0.940; 0.353–0.783; 0.207–0.467; and 0.012–0.028 µg/g d. m., respectively. When comparing the maximum and minimum values for site elements of L. salicaria, the concentration of N varied by 1.6, K—1.6, Ca—1.8, Mg—2.3, Na—6.1, Fe—6.8, Zn—2.4, Cu—1.5, Pb—6.9, Ni—2.2, Cr—2.2, and Cd—2.3 times. The coefficient of variation (CV) of element concentrations in sites was moderate to large: N—15.4%, K—14.3%, Ca—18.6%, Mg—24.8%, Na—50.7%, Fe—47.0%, Zn—24.9%, Cu—14.5%, Pb—57.1%, Ni—30.11%, Cr—26.0%, and Cd—38.6%. Lythrum salicaria populations growing near regulated riverbeds were characterized by significantly (p < 0.05) lower concentrations of Ca and Mg, and significantly (p < 0.05) higher concentrations of N, K, Fe, Na, Ni, Cr and Cd. The PLP.AFLP was negatively correlated with concentrations of N, Na, Fe, Ni, Cr, and Cd. The L. salicaria population with the lowest leaf N and Na concentration showed the highest genetic polymorphism (PLP.AFLP = 65.4%), while the least polymorphic population (PLP.AFLP = 35.0%) did not show extreme concentrations of either element. In conclusion, our elemental analysis of L. salicaria populations showed that ionomic parameters are related to genomic parameters, and some habitat differences are reflected in the ionomes of the populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions in a Changing World (NEOBIOTA 2022))
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22 pages, 5174 KiB  
Article
Occurrence of Gastrointestinal Parasites in Synanthropic Neozoan Egyptian Geese (Alopochen aegyptiaca, Linnaeus 1766) in Germany
by Ella F. Fischer, Sabine Recht, Juan Vélez, Linda Rogge, Anja Taubert and Carlos R. Hermosilla
Diversity 2023, 15(3), 388; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15030388 - 08 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1915
Abstract
Various studies have shown that the transmission and passage of alien and native pathogens play a critical role in the establishment process of an invasive species and its further spread. Egyptian geese (Alopochen aegyptiaca) are neozotic birds on various continents. They [...] Read more.
Various studies have shown that the transmission and passage of alien and native pathogens play a critical role in the establishment process of an invasive species and its further spread. Egyptian geese (Alopochen aegyptiaca) are neozotic birds on various continents. They live not only in the countryside near fresh water bodies but also in urban habitats in Central Europe with close contact to humans and their pets. Although their rapid distribution in Europe is widely debated, scientific studies on the anthropozoonotic risks of the population and studies on the present endoparasites in Egyptian geese are rare worldwide. In the present study, 114 shot Egyptian geese and 148 non-invasively collected faecal samples of wild Egyptian geese from 11 different Federal States in Germany were examined. A total of 13 metazoan endoparasite species in 12 different genera were identified. The main endoparasites found were Hystrichis tricolor, Polymorphus minutus, and, in lesser abundance, Cloacotaenia sp. and Echinuria uncinata. Adult stages of Echinostoma revolutum, an anthropozoonotic heteroxenic trematode, were found in 7.9% of the animals examined postmortem. This species was additionally identified by molecular analysis. Although Egyptian geese live in communities with native waterfowl, it appears that they have a lower parasitic load in general. The acquisition of generalistic parasites in an alien species and the associated increased risk of infection for native species is known as “spill-back” and raises the question of impacts on native waterfowl. Differences between animals from rural populations and urban populations were observed. The present study represents the first large-scale survey on gastrointestinal parasites of free-ranging Egyptian geese. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions in a Changing World (NEOBIOTA 2022))
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