Diversity, Ecology, and Evolution of Hydrozoans

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (18 February 2022) | Viewed by 6177

Special Issue Editor

1. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (DISAT), University of Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milan, Italy
2. Marine Research and High Education (MaRHE) Center, University of Milano-Bicocca, Magoodhoo 12030, Maldives
Interests: coral reefs; phylogenetics; Hydrozoa; biodiversity; species delimitation; integrative taxonomy; symbiosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrozoans are an important component of benthic and planktonic environments and are distributed worldwide, in both freshwater and marine ecosystems, and from shallow to deep waters. Knowledge on various aspects of hydrozoan biology is constantly updated, from the molecular to the ecosystemic level. For instance, many species have been recently demonstrated to harbor unsuspected cryptic diversity, to be involved in peculiar associations, and also to be affected by current global climate change. However, despite their known important ecological roles and continuously updated diversity, many questions on their ecology, taxonomy, and evolution are still open. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for integrative studies aimed at better understanding of multiple aspects of the ecology, diversity (both morphological and genetic), and evolution of members of the class Hydrozoa. Particular attention will be given to studies that adopt multidisciplinary approaches.

Dr. Davide Maggioni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Hydrozoa
  • gelatinous zooplankton
  • integrative taxonomy
  • symbiosis
  • species interactions
  • evolution
  • ecology
  • climate change
  • alien species

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 8027 KiB  
Article
The First Deep-Sea Stylasterid (Hydrozoa, Stylasteridae) of the Red Sea
Diversity 2022, 14(4), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14040241 - 25 Mar 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3174
Abstract
The Stylasteridae, commonly known as lace corals, is a family of colonial calcifying hydrozoans mostly inhabiting deep waters. Stylasterids show a cosmopolitan distribution but, in some areas, they are characterized by low species diversity, such as in the Red Sea, where only a [...] Read more.
The Stylasteridae, commonly known as lace corals, is a family of colonial calcifying hydrozoans mostly inhabiting deep waters. Stylasterids show a cosmopolitan distribution but, in some areas, they are characterized by low species diversity, such as in the Red Sea, where only a shallow-water species has been reported so far. With this work, we provide the first evidence of a deep-sea stylasterid inhabiting the NEOM region in the northern Saudi Arabian Red Sea, at depths ranging between 166 and 492 m. Morphological examinations revealed that this species was previously unknown and belonging to the genus Stylaster. We, therefore, describe Stylaster tritoni sp. nov., representing the first record of the genus in the Red Sea. Lastly, the phylogenetic position of the species within the Stylasteridae was evaluated, revealing a close relationship with shallow-water Indo-Pacific and Western Atlantic Stylaster species and confirming the polyphyletic nature of the genus Stylaster. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity, Ecology, and Evolution of Hydrozoans)
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17 pages, 1676 KiB  
Article
Morphogenetic Polyvariance in the Colonial Hydroid Dynamena pumila (L.)
Diversity 2021, 13(12), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13120683 - 20 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2130
Abstract
The formation of aberrant modules (internodes) of the shoot was found sporadically in the colonial hydroid Dynamena pumila from the family Sertulariidae, which is distinguished by the symmetrical two-row position of the hydrotheca on the shoot stem. Despite rare significant deviations from the [...] Read more.
The formation of aberrant modules (internodes) of the shoot was found sporadically in the colonial hydroid Dynamena pumila from the family Sertulariidae, which is distinguished by the symmetrical two-row position of the hydrotheca on the shoot stem. Despite rare significant deviations from the norm in the structure of some modules, the following modules in the shoots are formed normally. All variants of deviation from the norm (called morphovariations) are classified and, in general, are represented by four groups according to the possible reasons for their occurrence. The morphotypes are the most interesting morphological variations and look like similar modules in other genera of hydroids. Considering the position of the aberrant modules on the shoots of one colony, we can confidently infer that they were formed at different times, which undermines the assumption that deviations from the norm in morphogenesis were caused by environmental factors. All morphovariations are characterized by certain occurrences. Consequently, the described phenomenon is not limited to phenotypic plasticity, polymorphism, or sequential changes of phenotypes in the life cycle and, therefore, is singled out as a special phenomenon called morphogenetic polyvariance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity, Ecology, and Evolution of Hydrozoans)
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