Distribution of Bryophytes in a Changing World

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 6847

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Silesian Museum, Nádražní okruh 31, CZ-746 01 Opava, Czech Republic
Interests: Bryophytes, Plants, climate change, Habitat suitability models, machine learning, invasion processes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a forthcoming Special Issue on the Distribution of Bryophytes in a Changing World as an amazing and dynamic field of science.

Bryophytes are the second largest group of terrestrial plants after angiosperms, and not only for that reason, they deserve our attention. In a changing world, it is important to understand the mechanisms of change that occur, and this topic is now even more important to understand due to ongoing climate change. The ranges of individual species are changing, some are expanding, and others are disappearing, so it is important to investigate the causes and consequences of such changes. It is a dynamic field of science and despite the amazing amount of rapidly accumulating information, there are still open questions and challenges in this fascinating field. Therefore, this Special Issue is focused on those changes from a broader perspective because it is not only about changes in the occurrence of bryophytes, but also their bioindication ability, changes in connection with climate change, understanding the causes and effects of such changes, predicting the future trends and others topics related to the changing world and bryophytes.

The team at Diversity and ourselves kindly invite you to submit a manuscript focused on any of the above topics. Although specific case studies with broad implications are welcome, we encourage authors to submit large-scale and/or multi-specific studies, synthesis works, and reviews that could better enlarge our knowledge of the distribution of Bryophytes in a Changing World. If you are interested in this opportunity or have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Dr. Lukáš Číhal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bryophytes
  • distribution
  • climate change
  • habitat suitability
  • diversity
  • bioindication
  • population dynamics
  • ecological functions
  • invasion processes
  • extinction processes

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 206 KiB  
Editorial
Bryophytes in a Changing World: Understanding Distribution Patterns, Risks, and Conservation
by Lukáš Číhal
Diversity 2023, 15(5), 647; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15050647 - 10 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1553
Abstract
Bryophytes are a group of small, non-vascular plants that include mosses, liverworts, and hornworts [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Bryophytes in a Changing World)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

12 pages, 2074 KiB  
Communication
Predicting the Future Distribution of Leucobryum aduncum under Climate Change
by Puwadol Chawengkul, Patsakorn Tiwutanon, Nuttha Sanevas and Ekaphan Kraichak
Diversity 2024, 16(2), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16020125 - 15 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1586
Abstract
Leucobryum aduncum is a moss species reported in many Southeast Asian regions, often found in forests with a high humidity. Climate change may impact the future distribution of this species. This study aimed to model the current distribution and predict the impact of [...] Read more.
Leucobryum aduncum is a moss species reported in many Southeast Asian regions, often found in forests with a high humidity. Climate change may impact the future distribution of this species. This study aimed to model the current distribution and predict the impact of climate change on L. aduncum distribution in the next 50 years across Southeast Asia. In the process, relevant climate variables in the distribution of the species were also identified. The occurrence data of this species with current and future climate models from CMIP6 under moderate (SSP2) scenarios were used to predict current and future L. aduncum distributions. Under the current climate, the predicted suitable areas for L. aduncum included most mountainous areas. However, many Southeast Asian areas showed a lower probability of finding this species in the next 50 years. The distribution area of this species will dramatically decrease by 50.16% in the current area. The most important ecological variables included the “mean temperature of the driest quarter” and the “annual temperature range”. This study suggests the possible impacts of an increased temperature and the scale of climate change on the distribution of sensitive plants like bryophytes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Bryophytes in a Changing World)
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13 pages, 3293 KiB  
Article
Potential Distribution of Bryophyte, Entodon challengeri (Entodontaceae), under Climate Warming in China
by Mingyang Cong, Yongkun Li and Wenjing Yang
Diversity 2023, 15(7), 871; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15070871 - 19 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 874
Abstract
Entodon challengeri (Paris) Cardot has important environmental monitoring and medical value. It is critical we inspect the influence of climate warming on its spatiotemporal distribution pattern. Based on actual geographical distribution records and environmental datasets, a MaxEnt model coupled with ArcGIS was executed [...] Read more.
Entodon challengeri (Paris) Cardot has important environmental monitoring and medical value. It is critical we inspect the influence of climate warming on its spatiotemporal distribution pattern. Based on actual geographical distribution records and environmental datasets, a MaxEnt model coupled with ArcGIS was executed to display the potential suitable habitats of E. challengeri in China under future climate warming scenarios. We showed the following. (i) The simulation accuracy of the MaxEnt model was excellent, with an AUC value of 0.918. (ii) Annual precipitation and precipitation during the wettest month were the critical factors that restricted the distribution range of E. challengeri. (iii) Current suitable habitats were concentrated in the northern temperate zone in eastern China. (iv) Under climate warming scenarios, on the spatial scale, the distributional pattern presented a shrinkage in the south and expansion in the north, which was more obvious in the RCP8.5 than in the RCP2.6 scenario. On the time scale, shrinkage of the potential distributional range was greater in the 2070s than in the 2050s. (v) The distributional centroids shifted to the northeast. In general, future climate warming will have a great negative effect on the suitability of habitats of E. challengeri. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Bryophytes in a Changing World)
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13 pages, 3939 KiB  
Article
Climate Change May Pose Additional Threats to the Endangered Endemic Species Encalypta buxbaumioidea in China
by Yujia Liao, Xiaotong Song, Yanhui Ye, Jiqi Gu, Ruihong Wang, Zhuogabayong, Dongping Zhao and Xiaoming Shao
Diversity 2023, 15(2), 269; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15020269 - 13 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1916
Abstract
Rare and endangered plant species (REPs) are important in biodiversity conservation, and some REPs with narrow habitats are facing serious challenges from climate change. Encalypta buxbaumioidea T. Cao, C, Gao & X, L. Bai is an endangered bryophyte species that is endemic to [...] Read more.
Rare and endangered plant species (REPs) are important in biodiversity conservation, and some REPs with narrow habitats are facing serious challenges from climate change. Encalypta buxbaumioidea T. Cao, C, Gao & X, L. Bai is an endangered bryophyte species that is endemic to China. To explore the consequences of climate change on the geographic distribution of this endangered species, we used maximum entropy to predict the potential distribution of this species in China under current and three future scenarios (RCP 2.6, RCP 4.5, and RCP 8.5) of two time periods (2050 and 2070) in China and assessed its conservation gaps. Twelve species occurrence sites and nine environmental variables were used in the modeling process. The results show that E. buxbaumioidea distribution is affected mainly by the annual mean temperature, isothermality, precipitation of the coldest quarter, and NDVI. According to species response curves, this species preferred habitats with annual mean temperature from −3 to 6 °C, precipitation of the coldest quarter from 14 to 77 mm, isothermality of more than 70%, and NDVI in the second quarter from 0.15 to 0.68. Currently, the most suitable habitat for this species is mainly distributed in the Qinghai–Tibet plateau, which is about 1.97 × 105 km2. The range would sharply reduce to 0.13–0.56% under future climate change. Nature reserves overlap with only 7.32% of the current distribution and would cover a much less portion of the area occupied by the species in the future scenarios, which means the current protected areas network is insufficient. Our results show that endangered bryophyte species are susceptible to environmental stress, especially climate change; therefore, the habitats of bryophytes should be taken into account when it comes to setting up protected areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Bryophytes in a Changing World)
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