Biomonitoring of Freshwater Ecosystems

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Freshwater Biodiversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 4407

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Conservation, School of Earth and Sustainability, College of Natural Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003-9285, USA
Interests: landscape ecology; climate change; ecohydrology; sustainability sciences; environmental sciences

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Freshwater ecosystems play a vital role in sustaining ecosystem services that are vital to human well-being. With increased pressure from land use and climate change, these ecosystems are altered at a rapid pace. There is a critical need to assess the state and changes in these systems for conservation and management. Biomonitoring provides us with a cost-effective and reliable way of assessing these changes in freshwater systems. This is because of using specific endpoints that are sensitive to disturbances. This Special Issue calls for papers on biomonitoring in freshwater systems, which could include bioindicators for biodiversity assessment, climate change impacts, land use stressors, organismal responses, habitat suitability indices, sensitivity scoring methods, sampling design, systems assessment, watershed studies, macroinvertebrate surveys, toxicity assessment, experimental methods, community assessments, biomonitoring for management, instrumentation, and biomonitoring design.

Dr. Timothy O. Randhir
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomonitoring
  • sampling design
  • modeling
  • organismal response
  • biodiversity
  • watersheds
  • freshwater ecology
  • conservation

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

17 pages, 1838 KiB  
Article
Microplastics Occurrence in Fish from Tocagua Lake, Low Basin Magdalena River, Colombia
by Lindys Miranda-Peña, Milena Urquijo, Victoria A. Arana, Roberto García-Alzate, Carlos A. García-Alzate and Jorge Trilleras
Diversity 2023, 15(7), 821; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15070821 - 29 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1644
Abstract
Following global trends, research to determine the presence and abundance of microplastics (MPs) in environmental matrices in Colombia has focused on the coastal and marine environments. However, little scientific information is available on the impact of this pollutant on wetlands and fish. In [...] Read more.
Following global trends, research to determine the presence and abundance of microplastics (MPs) in environmental matrices in Colombia has focused on the coastal and marine environments. However, little scientific information is available on the impact of this pollutant on wetlands and fish. In this study, we provided scientific data on the occurrence and abundance of MPs in water and fish from Tocagua Lake, an important wetland in the Colombian Caribbean, and the unique habitat of wild cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus). Water (72) and fish (228 individuals of six species) samples were collected during four sampling events and two climatic seasons (wet and dry). A total of 1174 microplastic particles were collected in water with an average abundance of microplastics at the six stations sampled during four sampling events of 0.96 ± 0.40 MPs/L, and 648 MPs were identified in the gastrointestinal tract of 191 individuals, corresponding to a frequency of occurrence of 83.7%. Black- and blue-colored fiber MPs were particles that predominated in both matrices (water and fish), and seven types of polymers were identified through attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. The abundance, type, and color of MPs in water and fish were not significantly different between seasons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomonitoring of Freshwater Ecosystems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

20 pages, 742 KiB  
Review
Biomonitoring for Watershed Protection from a Multiscale Land-Use Perspective
by Kaline de Mello, Ricardo Hideo Taniwaki, Diego Rodrigues Macedo, Cecília Gontijo Leal and Timothy O. Randhir
Diversity 2023, 15(5), 636; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15050636 - 8 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1962
Abstract
The types and intensification of land use in the watershed affect the living organisms in aquatic ecosystems differently; this impact will also vary according to temporal and spatial scales. Understanding these interactions is crucial in the design of biomonitoring programs to detect the [...] Read more.
The types and intensification of land use in the watershed affect the living organisms in aquatic ecosystems differently; this impact will also vary according to temporal and spatial scales. Understanding these interactions is crucial in the design of biomonitoring programs to detect the effect of different pollutants in freshwater ecosystems and improve watershed management and conservation strategies. Therefore, this paper qualitatively reviews biomonitoring studies in freshwater ecosystems to evaluate the impact of different land use types on multiple scales in watersheds. The paper is organized into four sections. The first section presents biomonitoring in different freshwater systems (streams, rivers, lakes, and reservoirs). In the second section, we describe the biomonitoring characteristics of the main land use types. In the third section, we explain how spatial and temporal scales affect biomonitoring. Finally, in the fourth section, we focus on biomonitoring planning and future prediction and discuss how to design biomonitoring programs and how to use models and eDNA in biomonitoring. Our review will assist in decision-making regarding biomonitoring programs in watersheds and will guide future studies on the different bioindicators for various land use types in diverse ecosystems worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomonitoring of Freshwater Ecosystems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop