Multimedia-Based Digital Learning

Editor


E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Engineering Department, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD)/IEETA, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: signal & image processing and applications; study devices & systems; multimedia-based teaching/learning methods and tools

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the rise of digital in all areas of our lives, we are seeing an increase in the use of digital services in learning. A variety of media, such as text, symbols, images, pictures, audio, video, and animations, have been designed to assist digital learning with tools that can be used in presentations, classroom or laboratory learning, simulations, e-learning, computer games, and virtual reality; thereby, students/ employees can learn basic knowledge and visualization skills through the Internet. The use of ICT in teaching transforms the learning environment from teacher-centred to learner-centred; the use of learning tools and applications provides students a stimulating experience so that they attain a better understanding of concepts.

Digital multimedia technology brings about improvement in teaching and learning. However, there are a number of limitations in this technology, such as unfriendly programming or user interface, single target group and area, lack of required knowledge and skill, and high cost of maintenance among others. It is important to explore advanced mobile technology with several multimedia components to enhance teaching and learning processes across a diverse group of learners.

In this Topic Collection, we will research all aspects of the area of multimedia technologies in digital learning, from mobile applications for teaching and learning to multimedia learning environments and virtual laboratories. Submissions should describe original, significant, and unpublished work. Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Advanced classroom technologies
  • Animation and 3D applications
  • Blended learning
  • Collaborative learning
  • Collaborative virtual environments
  • Computational thinking
  • Curriculum content design and development
  • Distance education
  • E-Assessment
  • Educational games and software
  • Educational multimedia
  • Educational robotics
  • Educational systems design
  • E-Learning initiatives
  • E-Learning platforms
  • E-tutoring
  • Internet
  • Learning analytics
  • Learning management systems
  • Managed learning environments
  • Mobile learning
  • Online classroom
  • Online/virtual laboratories
  • Open access education
  • Simulation and animation
  • Smartphones and mobile applications
  • Web-based learning communities

Dr. Manuel Reis
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Digital is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

2024

Jump to: 2023

20 pages, 1953 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Augmented Reality on Very Young Learners’ Motivation and Learning of the Alphabet and Vocabulary
by Eleni Korosidou
Digital 2024, 4(1), 195-214; https://doi.org/10.3390/digital4010010 - 13 Feb 2024
Viewed by 535
Abstract
This study aspires to contribute some initial results to the growing area of research regarding technology potential in the field of early foreign language literacy. An experiment was conducted to examine very young learners’ alphabet and vocabulary learning and retention in an early [...] Read more.
This study aspires to contribute some initial results to the growing area of research regarding technology potential in the field of early foreign language literacy. An experiment was conducted to examine very young learners’ alphabet and vocabulary learning and retention in an early foreign language (FL) learning context when implementing augmented reality (AR) applications, while very young learners’ motivation was also assessed. A pilot intervention was implemented in a state school in northern Greece. The participants (n = 26) were primary school first-graders (5.5–6 years old) and were assigned into two groups, experimental (13) and control (13). To examine the effects of the intervention, this current study employed two instruments: (a) a pre-test–post-test model to assess young learners’ alphabet and vocabulary learning during three phases and (b) a questionnaire to assess their motivation during the learning process. The findings of this study reveal that both groups displayed significant improvements in FL alphabet and vocabulary learning; however, there are statistical differences in favor of the experimental group regarding long-term alphabet and vocabulary learning and retention. Furthermore, qualitative results regarding children’s perceptions of the technology used indicate that AR was highly appealing and motivating to participating students. Full article
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2023

Jump to: 2024

23 pages, 3871 KiB  
Article
Analysis of the Learning Process of Computer Programming Logic in an 8-Year-Old Elementary School Student at Home through the Scratch Program
by Victor García
Digital 2024, 4(1), 69-91; https://doi.org/10.3390/digital4010002 - 25 Dec 2023
Viewed by 774
Abstract
This paper presents a study guide and an analysis of its use in the computer programming learning process of an 8-year-old elementary school student through the Scratch program. The research’s objective is to explore and understand how this individual student approaches learning programming [...] Read more.
This paper presents a study guide and an analysis of its use in the computer programming learning process of an 8-year-old elementary school student through the Scratch program. The research’s objective is to explore and understand how this individual student approaches learning programming skills and tackles challenges within the Scratch environment. An individual case study approach was adopted at home, combining qualitative and quantitative methods to gain a comprehensive insight into the student’s learning process. The study was conducted without grant support, and the researcher actively participated as an educator and observer in the student’s learning sessions. Performance was assessed, and a semi-structured interview was conducted to inquire about the student’s experiences, motivations, and interests regarding programming in Scratch, as well as their feelings after the training. Additionally, the student’s activities during programming sessions were meticulously recorded, and projects created in Scratch were analyzed to assess progress and understanding of concepts. The findings of this research have the potential to contribute to the field of programming education and provide valuable insights into how young elementary school-aged individuals can acquire computer and programming skills in an interactive environment such as Scratch. The results obtained demonstrate that using the proposed guide to introduce elementary school students to programming at home, with parents acting as educators, is feasible. Therefore, it helps facilitate access to this knowledge, which is currently limited for many individuals in an official educational setting. Full article
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22 pages, 8263 KiB  
Article
Using Virtual Reality to Support Retrieval Practice in Blended Learning: An Interdisciplinary Professional Development Collaboration between Novice and Expert Teachers
by Pamela Cowan and Rachel Farrell
Digital 2023, 3(3), 251-272; https://doi.org/10.3390/digital3030016 - 12 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1675
Abstract
This small-scale study comprised an evaluation of a teacher professional learning experience that involved the collaborative creation of resources using immersive virtual reality (VR) as a retrieval practice tool, specifically focusing on the open access aspects of the SchooVR platform. SchooVR offers teachers [...] Read more.
This small-scale study comprised an evaluation of a teacher professional learning experience that involved the collaborative creation of resources using immersive virtual reality (VR) as a retrieval practice tool, specifically focusing on the open access aspects of the SchooVR platform. SchooVR offers teachers and students tools to enhance teaching and learning by providing a range of virtual field trips and the ability to create customised virtual tours aligned with curriculum requirements. By leveraging the immersive 360° learning environment, learners can interact with content in meaningful ways, fostering engagement and deepening understanding. This study draws on the experiences of a group of postgraduate teacher education students and co-operating teachers in Ireland and Northern Ireland who collaborated on the creation of a number of immersive learning experiences across a range of subjects during a professional learning event. The research showcases how immersive realities, such as VR, can be integrated effectively into blended learning spaces to create resources that facilitate retrieval practice and self-paced study, thereby supporting the learning process. By embedding VR experiences into the curriculum, students are given opportunities for independent practice, review, and personalised learning tasks, all of which contribute to the consolidation of knowledge and the development of metacognitive skills. The findings suggest that SchooVR and similar immersive technologies have the potential to enhance educational experiences and promote effective learning outcomes across a variety of subject areas. Full article
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19 pages, 3949 KiB  
Article
Teaching Data Science with Literate Programming Tools
by Marcus Birkenkrahe
Digital 2023, 3(3), 232-250; https://doi.org/10.3390/digital3030015 - 08 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1595
Abstract
This paper presents a case study on using Emacs and Org-mode for literate programming in undergraduate computer and data science courses. Over three academic terms, the author mandated these tools across courses in R, Python, C++, SQL, and more. The onboarding relied on [...] Read more.
This paper presents a case study on using Emacs and Org-mode for literate programming in undergraduate computer and data science courses. Over three academic terms, the author mandated these tools across courses in R, Python, C++, SQL, and more. The onboarding relied on simplified Emacs tutorials and starter configurations. Students gained proficiency after undertaking initial practice. Live coding sessions demonstrated the flexible instruction enabled by literate notebooks. Assignments and projects required documentation alongside functional code. Student feedback showed enthusiasm for learning a versatile IDE, despite some frustration with the learning curve. Skilled students highlighted efficiency gains in a unified environment. However, the uneven adoption of documentation practices pointed to a need for better incorporation into grading. Additionally, some students found Emacs unintuitive, desiring more accessible options. This highlights a need to match tools to skill levels, potentially starting novices with graphical IDEs before introducing Emacs. The key takeaways are as follows: literate programming aids comprehension but requires rigorous onboarding and reinforcement, and Emacs excels for advanced workflows but has a steep initial curve. With proper support, these tools show promise for data science education. Full article
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28 pages, 11354 KiB  
Article
Location-Based Augmented Reality for Cultural Heritage Education: Creating Educational, Gamified Location-Based AR Applications for the Prehistoric Lake Settlement of Dispilio
by Alexandros Kleftodimos, Maria Moustaka and Athanasios Evagelou
Digital 2023, 3(1), 18-45; https://doi.org/10.3390/digital3010002 - 15 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3144
Abstract
Today, augmented reality (AR) applications are being used in many fields, such as advertising, entertainment, tourism, and education. Location-based augmented reality (AR) is a technology where interactive digital content is associated with real-world locations and their geo-based markers. The merging of the real-world [...] Read more.
Today, augmented reality (AR) applications are being used in many fields, such as advertising, entertainment, tourism, and education. Location-based augmented reality (AR) is a technology where interactive digital content is associated with real-world locations and their geo-based markers. The merging of the real-world environment with the digital content occurs when the user reaches these locations. Location-based AR applications are typically experienced using mobile devices with the ability to report the user’s location via GPS. These applications are increasingly used in education, since it has been shown that they positively affect student satisfaction and engagement. Furthermore, it is known in the literature that learner satisfaction and engagement increase when gamification and storytelling techniques are incorporated into the educational process. The aim of the study is to present two location-based, educational augmented-reality applications that utilize gamification and storytelling to provide cultural heritage knowledge about a prehistoric lake settlement. The study also aims to provide ideas and guidance to educators who wish to create applications that transform educational visits to archeological sites and museums into engaging augmented-reality experiences. Both applications underwent a preliminary evaluation using a sample of 71 higher-education students and a sample of 58 school students. The findings showed that the applications scored well in aspects such as ease of use, student satisfaction, and perceived educational usefulness. Full article
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