Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Diagnosis to Identification of Novel Therapeutic Targets and Minimally Invasive Treatments

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2022) | Viewed by 4620

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Division of Urology, European Institute of Oncology-IRCCS, 20141 Milan, Italy
Interests: cancer cells; cancer biology; prostate cancer; urology; prostate; bladder cancer; urologic oncology; cancer metastasis; oncology; doppler ultrasonography
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Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Unit of Oncologic Minimally- Invasive Urology and Andrology, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy
Interests: renal cell carcinoma; prostate cancer; bladder cancer; robotic surgery; biomarkers
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Department of Urology, University of Verona, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata Verona- Polo Chirurgico Confortini - Borgo Trento, Verona, Italy
Interests: renal cell carcinoma; prostate cancer; bladder cancer; robotic surgery; biomarkers
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Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation – Urology, Andrology and Kidney Transplantation Unit - University of Bari « Aldo Moro », 70124 Bari, Italy
Interests: renal cell carcinoma; prostate cancer; bladder cancer
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Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation – Urology, Andrology and Kidney Transplantation Unit - University of Bari « Aldo Moro », 70124 Bari, Italy
Interests: renal cell carcinoma; prostate cancer; bladder cancer
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Department of Urology, University of Bologna, S-Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy
Interests: renal cell carcinoma; prostate cancer; bladder cancer; robotic surgery
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1. Division of Urology, European Institute of Oncology-IRCCS, Milan, Italy
2. Department of Oncology and Haematology-Oncology, Università degli studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Interests: renal cell carcinoma; prostate cancer; bladder cancer; robotic surgery
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1. Division of Urology, European Institute of Oncology-IRCCS, Milan, Italy
2. Department of Oncology and Haematology-Oncology, Università degli studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Interests: renal cell carcinoma; prostate cancer; bladder cancer; robotic surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most frequent malignancy affecting the adult kidney and the twelfth most common cancer. The pathophysiology of RCC is complex and arises from a combination of gene mutations (i.e., VHL, PBMR1, SETD2, BAP1, etc.) in addition to other factors such as diabetes, obesity, smoking, and hypertension. In the early stages, the disease is frequently asymptomatic and incidentally diagnosed by imaging, having a good prognosis; conversely, RCC has a high mortality rate in advanced phases, due to poor responses to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The progressive introduction of high-throughput technologies and recent studies of molecular and genomic profiling have shed new light on the pathophysiology of RCC. Moreover, in recent years, there has been a growing interest in identifying tumor markers not only for diagnostic purposes but also to improve the predictive power of clinical and pathological parameters. This Special Issue of Diagnostics aims to collect studies on minimally invasive treatment and translational research for the management and diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Biomedicines.

Dr. Matteo Ferro
Prof. Dr. Andrea Minervini
Prof. Dr. Alessandro Antonelli
Dr. Angelo Porreca
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Lucarelli
Dr. Michele Battaglia
Prof. Dr. Ditonno Pasquale
Prof. Dr. Riccardo Schiavina
Prof. Dr. Ottavio De Cobelli
Dr. Gennaro Musi
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • renal cell carcinoma
  • biomarker
  • molecular biology
  • diagnosis
  • prognosis
  • pathology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1829 KiB  
Article
Small Renal Masses without Gross Fat: What Is the Role of Contrast-Enhanced MDCT?
by Gerta Repeckaite, Kristina Zviniene, Justina Jankauskiene, Algidas Basevicius and Daimantas Milonas
Diagnostics 2022, 12(2), 553; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12020553 - 21 Feb 2022
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Abstract
Increased detection of small renal masses (SRMs) has encouraged research for non-invasive diagnostic tools capable of adequately differentiating malignant vs. benign SRMs and the type of the tumour. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has been suggested as an alternative to intervention, therefore, it is [...] Read more.
Increased detection of small renal masses (SRMs) has encouraged research for non-invasive diagnostic tools capable of adequately differentiating malignant vs. benign SRMs and the type of the tumour. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has been suggested as an alternative to intervention, therefore, it is important to determine both the capabilities and limitations of MDCT for SRM evaluation. In our study, two abdominal radiologists retrospectively blindly assessed MDCT scan images of 98 patients with incidentally detected lipid-poor SRMs that did not present as definitely aggressive lesions on CT. Radiological conclusions were compared to histopathological findings of materials obtained during surgery that were assumed as the gold standard. The probability (odds ratio (OR)) in regression analyses, sensitivity (SE), and specificity (SP) of predetermined SRM characteristics were calculated. Correct differentiation between malignant vs. benign SRMs was detected in 70.4% of cases, with more accurate identification of malignant (73%) in comparison to benign (65.7%) lesions. The radiological conclusions of SRM type matched histopathological findings in 56.1%. Central scarring (OR 10.6, p = 0.001), diameter of lesion (OR 2.4, p = 0.003), and homogeneous accumulation of contrast medium (OR 3.4, p = 0.03) significantly influenced the accuracy of malignant diagnosis. SE and SP of these parameters varied from 20.6% to 91.3% and 22.9% to 74.3%, respectively. In conclusion, MDCT is able to correctly differentiate malignant versus uncharacteristic benign SRMs in more than 2/3 of cases. However, frequency of the correct histopathological SRM type MDCT identification remains low. Full article
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8 pages, 2493 KiB  
Article
PSMA-PET/CT in Patients with Recurrent Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Histopathological Correlations of Imaging Findings
by Falk Gühne, Philipp Seifert, Bernhard Theis, Matthias Steinert, Martin Freesmeyer and Robert Drescher
Diagnostics 2021, 11(7), 1142; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11071142 - 23 Jun 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2153
Abstract
PET/CT with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted tracers has been used in the diagnosis and staging of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). For ccRCC primary tumors, PET parameters were shown to predict histologic grade and features. The aim of this study [...] Read more.
PET/CT with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted tracers has been used in the diagnosis and staging of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). For ccRCC primary tumors, PET parameters were shown to predict histologic grade and features. The aim of this study was to correlate PSMA PET/CT with histopathological findings in patients with metastatic recurrence of ccRCC. Patients with ccRCC who underwent PSMA-targeted PET/CT and subsequent histopathological evaluation of suspicious lesions were included. Specimens underwent immunohistochemical marking. Lesion diameter, volume and tracer uptake were correlated with the extent and intensity of molecular PSMA expression and with clinical findings. Twelve PET-positive lesions of nine patients were evaluated. Eleven ccRCC metastases and one prostate carcinoma were detected histopathologically. Molecular PSMA expression was detected in all lesions, which intensity and distribution did not correlate with PET parameters. PSMA-targeted PET/CT is a feasible tool for the evaluation of patients with ccRCC but cannot reliably predict histologic features of metastases. PSMA may also be expressed in malignant lesions other than ccRCC, leading to incidental detection of these tumors. Full article
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