Special Issue "Technologies for Pandemic Response: Trends, Insights and Future Directions"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2021) | Viewed by 2221

Special Issue Editors

Pictor Ltd., 24 Balfour Road Parnell, Auckland 1052, New Zealand
Interests: immunoassays; IVD; POC technologies; bioanalytical sciences; nanotechnology; mobile healthcare

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a need for developing technologies that are targeted specifically for the pandemic response. The current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has witnessed a continuously evolving trend in technologies, which involves technologies for the diagnosis, monitoring, management and treatment of COVID-19 subjects. A wide range of factors and scenarios, healthcare resources, production capacity, supply chains and distribution, preventive measures including lockdowns, and public awareness need to be considered to arrive at an ideal strategy for combating the pandemic and preventing its spread. There have been striking advances in in vitro diagnostics (IVDs), mobile healthcare technologies and point-of-care testing (POCT), which have significantly aided the effective diagnosis, monitoring and management of COVID-19. Several molecular, rapid antigen and serology tests have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under emergency use authorization (EUA) and are Conformité Européenne (CE) marked. Additionally, specific tests, such as SARS-CoV-2 neutralization antibody tests and fully quantitative antibody tests, for monitoring the efficacy of vaccines and convalescent plasma, have also been developed. Various smart applications for contact tracing have been beneficial for controlling the spread of SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, artificial intelligence and machine learning have facilitated the automated detection and classification of COVID-19 based on chest computed tomography scans, and the assessment of COVID-19 severity in patients. Telemedicine and digital healthcare have played a phenomenal role, illustrating their immense utility for the pandemic response. However, there is a stringent need for the extensive performance evaluation and clinical validation of technologies before they enter the market in order to ensure the safety of patients. The current pandemic has shown how hundreds of IVD kits and technologies that have not been stringently clinically validated and are lacking adequate performance data have initially been approved by the FDA under EUA and later recalled from the market. The emerging technologies will pave the way to next-generation healthcare with better health outcomes and prepare us for future pandemics.

The topics of interest for this Special Issue are specified below, although any manuscript related to the theme of the Special Issue but on other topics will also be considered.

Dr. Sandeep K. Vashist
Dr. Subramanian Murugan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • In vitro diagnostics
  • Point-of-care testing
  • Molecular testing
  • Serology testing
  • Mobile healthcare technologies
  • Biosensors
  • Biomarkers for disease severity
  • Chest computed tomography scans
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Telemedicine
  • Digital healthcare
  • Contact tracing
  • Clinical validation
  • Performance evaluation

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 1672 KiB  
Article
Analytical Validation and Clinical Application of Rapid Serological Tests for SARS-CoV-2 Suitable for Large-Scale Screening
Diagnostics 2021, 11(5), 869; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11050869 - 12 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1546
Abstract
Recently, large-scale screening for COVID-19 has presented a major challenge, limiting timely countermeasures. Therefore, the application of suitable rapid serological tests could provide useful information, however, little evidence regarding their robustness is currently available. In this work, we evaluated and compared the analytical [...] Read more.
Recently, large-scale screening for COVID-19 has presented a major challenge, limiting timely countermeasures. Therefore, the application of suitable rapid serological tests could provide useful information, however, little evidence regarding their robustness is currently available. In this work, we evaluated and compared the analytical performance of a rapid lateral-flow test (LFA) and a fast semiquantitative fluorescent immunoassay (FIA) for anti-nucleocapsid (anti-NC) antibodies, with the reverse transcriptase real-time PCR assay as the reference. In 222 patients, LFA showed poor sensitivity (55.9%) within two weeks from PCR, while later testing was more reliable (sensitivity of 85.7% and specificity of 93.1%). Moreover, in a subset of 100 patients, FIA showed high sensitivity (89.1%) and specificity (94.1%) after two weeks from PCR. The coupled application for the screening of 183 patients showed satisfactory concordance (K = 0.858). In conclusion, rapid serological tests were largely not useful for early diagnosis, but they showed good performance in later stages of infection. These could be useful for back-tracing and/or to identify potentially immune subjects. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop