Perspectives on Diagnosis and Management in Cardiac Surgery

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 957

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Adult Cardiac Surgery, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, 356 Leoforos Syggrou, 17674 Athens, Greece
Interests: evidence based medicine; cardiac surgery; thoracic aorta diseases; heart valve diseases; minimal invasive cardiac surgery; outcomes; cardiovascular disease pathologies; cardiovascular disease treatments; biomarkers in cardiovascular disease; critical care patients
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, 356 Leoforos Syggrou, Athens 17674, Greece
Interests: pediatric cardiac surgery; pediatric cardiology; congenital heart surgery; pediatric cardiology intensive care; pediatric cardiac surgery intensive care; critical care patients with congenital heart disease; outcomes after pediatric cardiac surgery; complex congenital heart disease; diagnosis; treatment; outcomes; long-term follow-up

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

New diagnostic approaches for heart and thoracic aorta diseases have arisen in the last 10–15 years. The techniques of 3D transesophageal echocardiography and 3D computed tomography angiography provide a different view for the diagnosis and management of heart and thoracic aorta diseases. Cardiac magnetic resonance has been established as an accurate diagnostic method for the assessment of cardiac anatomy and function. On the other hand, coronary computed tomography is the method of choice for revealing asymptomatic patients with severe coronary artery disease and seems that it will be one of the routine examinations for the diagnosis of patients with suspected coronary artery disease in the future. Artificial intelligence has emerged as a new method for the diagnosis and treatment for patients with heart disease. In addition, 3D printing and reconstruction of the heart and great vessels offer a valuable tool for the accurate diagnosis of acquired and congenital heart diseases. Furthermore, virtual reality and augmented reality have made their way into healthcare and can display interactive 2D and 3D images, helping physicians to achieve a detailed diagnosis and optimal management.

With great pleasure, we are looking forward to submitting your work and research (research articles and reviews) in this Special Issue.

Dr. Georgios Samanidis
Dr. Meletios Kanakis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cardiac surgery
  • artificial intelligence
  • diagnosis
  • management
  • 3D transesophageal echocardiography
  • 3D computed tomography
  • cardiac magnetic resonance
  • 3D printing and reconstruction
  • coronary computed tomography
  • computed tomography angiography

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 1508 KiB  
Article
Troponin T and Survival following Cardiac Surgery in Patients Supported with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Post-Cardiotomy Shock
by Małgorzata Celińska-Spodar, Marta Załęska Kocięcka, Ilona Kowalik, Piotr Kołsut, Ewa Sitkowska-Rysiak, Jarosław Szymański and Janina Stępińska
Diagnostics 2024, 14(1), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14010045 - 25 Dec 2023
Viewed by 757
Abstract
Background: While troponin is an established biomarker of cardiac injury, its prognostic significance in post-cardiotomy cardiogenic shock patients supported by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (PCCS–VA-ECMO) remains unclear. Objective: This study aimed to assess the correlation between early post-operative troponin T levels and both [...] Read more.
Background: While troponin is an established biomarker of cardiac injury, its prognostic significance in post-cardiotomy cardiogenic shock patients supported by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (PCCS–VA-ECMO) remains unclear. Objective: This study aimed to assess the correlation between early post-operative troponin T levels and both short-term and long-term mortality outcomes in this cohort. Methods: We evaluated 1457 troponin T measurements from 102 PCCS–VA-ECMO patients treated from 2013 to 2018 at a specialized cardio-surgical and transplantation center. Emphasis was placed on troponin concentrations at 24–48 h post-surgery, post-VA-ECMO implantation, and peak troponin levels in relation to VA-ECMO weaning, as well as 90-day and one-year mortality. Results: No significant association was observed between troponin T levels post-VA-ECMO implantation and 90-day mortality (median: 1338 ng/L for overall, 1529 ng/L for survivors vs. 1294 ng/L for non-survivors; p = 0.146) or between peak troponin levels and 90-day mortality (median: 3583 ng/L for overall, 3337 ng/L for survivors vs. 3666 ng/L for non-survivors; p = 0.709). Comprehensive multivariate models showed no correlation between troponin levels and various mortality endpoints. Notably, age, procedure urgency, type, LVEF pre-surgery, Euroscore II, prior cardiac arrest, and VA-ECMO duration were not linked with troponin release. Hemodiafiltration emerged as the strongest mortality risk factor [HR 2.4]. Conclusions: Isolated early Troponin T release and peak troponin T were not associated, while organ complications were linked with VA-ECMO weaning or short- and long-term prognosis. The results underscore the multi-organ implications of PCCS in determining survival. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perspectives on Diagnosis and Management in Cardiac Surgery)
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