Critical Issues in Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Diseases

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2024 | Viewed by 1257

Special Issue Editors

Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece
Interests: pediatric surgery; neonatal surgery; pediatric urology; urinary tract infections; vesicoureteral reflux; obstructive uropathies; undescended testes; hypospadias
Pediatric Respiratory Unit, Department of Pediatrics, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece
Interests: respiratory physiology; lung development; asthma; cariopulmonary exercise testing
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We live in an era of enormous technological advancements in every field of medicine. Pediatrics and pediatric subspecialties have been significantly influenced by this evolution, which has led to both advancements and setbacks. Paraclinical diagnostic interventions allow us to identify congenital and other diseases with speed and efficacy that our predecessors in medical practice could never have imagined. The use of ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, molecular and biochemical examinations, genetic assays, is evolving day by day, proving essential tools for pediatric medicine, while novel pharmaceutical factors and treatment interventional modalities provide solutions to difficult—and in many cases, formerly uncurable—conditions. However, these diagnostic conveniences have often negatively affected clinical practice, particularly medical history and clinical examination, especially among younger clinicians. Furthermore, the ease of the use of pharmaceutical agents has led to drug overuse, as exemplified by the bacterial resistance resulting from overuse of antibiotics.

In this Special Issue, we will explore the diagnostic and therapeutic experiences of colleagues in various sectors of pediatrics and their associated specialties. We are seeking original articles and comprehensive reviews which investigate the advancements in diagnosis and management of pediatric diseases, and how they have affected clinical practice. We are particularly interested in works that address researchers’ difficulties, complications, and concerns, and in their proposals for future practice.

Dr. Xenophon Sinopidis
Dr. Sotirios Fouzas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatrics
  • neonatology
  • pediatric endocrinology
  • pediatric pulmonary disease
  • pediatric surgery
  • pediatric infectious diseases
  • pediatric nephrology
  • pediatric cardiology
  • pediatric radiology
  • pediatric gastroenterology
  • pediatric nephrology
  • pediatric urology
  • pediatric oncology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 596 KiB  
Article
Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Activin-A and Clusterin in Children and Adolescents with Obesity or Type-1 Diabetes Mellitus
Diagnostics 2024, 14(4), 450; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14040450 - 19 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Inflammation plays a crucial role in diabetes and obesity through macrophage activation. Macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), activin-A, and clusterin are chemokines with known roles in diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study is to investigate their possible diagnostic and/or early prognostic values [...] Read more.
Inflammation plays a crucial role in diabetes and obesity through macrophage activation. Macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), activin-A, and clusterin are chemokines with known roles in diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study is to investigate their possible diagnostic and/or early prognostic values in children and adolescents with obesity and type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: We obtained serum samples from children and adolescents with a history of T1DM or obesity, in order to measure and compare MCP-1, activin-A, and clusterin concentrations. Results: Forty-three subjects were included in each of the three groups (controls, T1DM, and obesity). MCP-1 values were positively correlated to BMI z-score. Activin-A was increased in children with obesity compared to the control group. A trend for higher values was detected in children with T1DM. MCP-1 and activin-A levels were positively correlated. Clusterin levels showed a trend towards lower values in children with T1DM or obesity compared to the control group and were negatively correlated to renal function. Conclusions: The inflammation markers MCP-1, activin-A, and clusterin are not altered in children with T1DM. Conversely, obesity in children is positively correlated to serum MCP-1 values and characterized by higher activin-A levels, which may reflect an already established systematic inflammation with obesity since childhood. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Issues in Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Diseases)
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13 pages, 1438 KiB  
Article
Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Autism Parenting Stress Index (APSI) among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Diagnostics 2023, 13(20), 3259; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics13203259 - 19 Oct 2023
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Abstract
(1) Background: This study aimed to validate the Greek version of the Autism Parenting Stress Index (APSI) among parents of children with ASD. (2) Methods: The translated version was administered to 113 parents (Male: 12, Female: 101, 39.24 years old, SD 6.70, age [...] Read more.
(1) Background: This study aimed to validate the Greek version of the Autism Parenting Stress Index (APSI) among parents of children with ASD. (2) Methods: The translated version was administered to 113 parents (Male: 12, Female: 101, 39.24 years old, SD 6.70, age range, 25–58) of children diagnosed with ASD and 127 parents (Male: 24, Female: 103, 41.08 years old, SD 6.22, age range: 27–56) of typically developing children. (3) Results: Significant differences between the APSI total scores and three domains between groups were observed. Although the initial factor structure could not be replicated, the APSI’s internal consistency was excellent (a = 0.914), with a high positive item–total correlation (0.900–0.917). The APSI’s test–retest reliability was excellent, showing an ICC equal to 0.922 [95%, CI: 0.900–0.940]. The APSI’s total score cut-off point was equal to 12.00 (AUC 0.845, p < 0.001) with a sensitivity of 0.839 and 1-specificity of 0.220. A principal component analysis of the 13 items, using varimax rotations, identified three factors, which explained approximately 45.8% of the overall variance. (4) Conclusions: The Greek version of the APSI exhibited discriminant validity for measuring parents of children with ASD. Greek health professionals can use it to assess the stress experienced by parents of children with ASD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Issues in Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Diseases)
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