Current Issue and Perspectives in Dermatopathology

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 2497

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Science and Human Oncology, Dermatological Clinic, University of Bari, Bari, Italy
Interests: dermatopathology; dermatology; skin diseases; skin tumors; soft tissue pathology; gynecopathology; neuropathology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Dermatopathological diagnostics embraces a large amount of information, as pathologies of different natures can occur at the skin level: inflammatory, immune, and accumulation pathologies, histiocytosis, and neoplastic pathologies proper. Although molecular biology is promising as a tool, dermatopathological diagnostics is still fully based on morphology and ancillary immunohistochemical techniques. In this Special Issue, we aim to collect case reports, case series, editorials, letters to the editor, original articles, and reviews that can help pathologists in daily diagnostics as well as provide a basis on which to start new insights and discoveries.

Dr. Gerardo Cazzato
Dr. Caterina Foti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dermatopathology
  • soft-tissue pathology
  • non-melanoma skin cancer
  • malignant melanoma

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 2462 KiB  
Article
Paediatric Spitzoid Neoplasms: 10-Year Retrospective Study Characterizing Histological, Clinical, Dermoscopic Presentation and FISH Test Results
by Astrid Herzum, Corrado Occella, Valerio Gaetano Vellone, Lodovica Gariazzo, Carlotta Pastorino, Jacopo Ferro, Angela Sementa, Katia Mazzocco, Nadia Vercellino and Gianmaria Viglizzo
Diagnostics 2023, 13(14), 2380; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics13142380 - 15 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 950
Abstract
Introduction: Spitzoid lesions are a wide tumour class comprising Spitz nevus (SN), atypical Spitz tumour (AST) and Spitz melanoma (SM). Materials and Methods: We conducted a single-centre-based retrospective survey on all histologically diagnosed spitzoid lesions of paediatric patients (1–18 years) of the last [...] Read more.
Introduction: Spitzoid lesions are a wide tumour class comprising Spitz nevus (SN), atypical Spitz tumour (AST) and Spitz melanoma (SM). Materials and Methods: We conducted a single-centre-based retrospective survey on all histologically diagnosed spitzoid lesions of paediatric patients (1–18 years) of the last 10 years (2012–2022). Histopathological reports and electronic records of patients were used to retrieve relevant data regarding patients’ features, clinical and dermatoscopical aspects of lesions when recorded, and FISH tests when present. Results: Of 255 lesions, 82% were histologically benign, 17% atypical, 1% malignant. Clinically, 100% of SM were large (≥6 mm) and raised; AST were mainly large (63%), raised (98%), pink (95%). Small (≤5 mm), pigmented, flat lesions correlated with benign histology (respectively 90%, 97%, 98% SN) (p < 0.0001). Dermatoscopical patterns were analysed in 100 patients: starburst pattern correlated with benign histology (26% SN (p = 0.004)), while multicomponent pattern correlated with atypical/malignant lesions (56% AST, 50% SM (p = 0.0052)). Eighty-five lesions were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): 34 (71% AST; 29% SN) were FISH-positive; 51 (63% SN; 37% AST) were FISH-negative (p = 0.0038). Discussion: This study confirmed predominant benign histology (82%) of paediatric spitzoid lesions, thus detecting 17% AST and 1% SM, highlighting the need for caution in handling spitzoid lesions. Conclusion: Until AST are considered potentially malignant proliferations and no reliable criteria are identified to distinguish them, the authors suggest a prudent approach, especially in children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Issue and Perspectives in Dermatopathology)
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3 pages, 713 KiB  
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Individual Keratinocyte Necroses in the Epidermis Are Apoptotic Keratinocytes in the Skin
by Mitsuhiro Tachibana, Hideki Hamayasu, Kazuki Tomita and Yuta Kage
Diagnostics 2023, 13(22), 3405; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics13223405 - 08 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The patient was a 44-year-old woman with Stevens–Johnson syndrome due to receiving Baktar® (sulfamethoxazole trimethoprim) medication at our outpatient dermatology clinic. The epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous adipose tissue samples showed numerous necrotic keratinocytes in the epidermis. Apoptotic nuclei were visualized as diaminobenzidine [...] Read more.
The patient was a 44-year-old woman with Stevens–Johnson syndrome due to receiving Baktar® (sulfamethoxazole trimethoprim) medication at our outpatient dermatology clinic. The epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous adipose tissue samples showed numerous necrotic keratinocytes in the epidermis. Apoptotic nuclei were visualized as diaminobenzidine brown deposits with immunoperoxidase staining for cleaved caspase-3. The cleaved caspase-3-positive findings were consistent with eosinophilic material that appeared to be necrotic cells within the epidermis. Therefore, these eosinophilic materials may be apoptotic bodies. Generally speaking, eosinophilic cells are considered necrotic keratinocytes, especially in Japan. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have used apoptotic immunohistochemical markers to examine whether these structures are apoptotic in a human specimen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Issue and Perspectives in Dermatopathology)
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