Advanced Research on Oral Cancer and Dental Implants

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 5769

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Education and Research Director, ICE Postgraduate Dental Institute and Hospital, Salford M50 3XZ, UK
2. School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK
3. Department of Health and Medicine, Lancaster Medical School, University of Lancaster, Lancaster LA1 4YW, UK
Interests: oral medicine; oral cancer; dental implants; digital dentistry; diabetes mellitus; salivary molecules; biomaterials; translational research

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Guest Editor
Department of Radiography, School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK
Interests: observer performance studies; receiver operating characteristic analysis; medical imaging

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Guest Editor
1. Director, ICE Postgraduate Dental Institute and Hospital, Salford M50 3XZ, UK
2. School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK
Interests: dental implants; sinus lifting; zygomatic implants; bone regeneration; full mouth rehabilitation; reconstructive jaw surgery

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Guest Editor
1. MBE, Director, ICE Postgraduate Dental Institute and Hospital, Salford M50 3XZ, UK
2. School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK
Interests: human factors; dental implants; bone regeneration; sinus lifting; digital dentistry; oral and maxillofacial surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral cancer is the eighth most frequent cancer worldwide, with a 5% survival rate of 50%, and oral cancer is sometimes in advanced stages at the time of diagnosis. Oral squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 90% of oral cavity cancers. It is an invasive cancer, and it can spread to other parts of body. The gold standard methods for diagnosing oral cancer are also invasive, costly, time consuming, and technique-sensitive.

Dental implants are known to be the optimal treatment option for partially or fully edentulous patients. There are several risk factors associated with dental implant failure that may lead to early implant loss and that may decrease the quality of life of the patient. Therefore, it is important to understand the optimization of the procedures and how to improve the survival of dental implants and their placement. New knowledge on how to support oral cancer patients and the role of implant dentistry is still needed to develop an evidence-based approach to overcome the challenges of robust knowledge in implant dentistry.

Advances in oral cancer research are required to provide new information about non-invasive screening and diagnostic methods, cellular processes and molecular biology, chemical pathways, and the pathogenesis of cancer for the identification of biological markers and molecular-targeted therapies. Along with the evaluation of the survival of dental implants in patients who are affected by oral cancer, the timing of implant placement and anatomy site as well as the treatment dosage that are relevant to understanding implant effectiveness.

This Special Issue invites research and studies on oral cancer and implant dentistry, especially those paying particular attention to translational research and clinical trials as well as high-quality review papers that will lead to an improved understanding of oral cancer and implant dentistry as well as novel methods and techniques for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and improved prognosis of patients.

Dr. Rabia Sannam Khan
Dr. John D. Thompson
Prof. Dr. Cemal Ucer
Prof. Dr. Simon Wright
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • head and neck cancer
  • oral squamous cell carcinoma
  • dental implants
  • oral surgery
  • tissue regeneration
  • peri-implantitis
  • oral rehabilitation
  • translational oral cancer research
  • biomarkers
  • molecular analysis and chemical pathways
  • non-invasive diagnostic methods
  • minimally invasive techniques
  • CAD/CAM prosthetics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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13 pages, 10814 KiB  
Article
Dental Implants with External Hex Inclined Shoulder in Full-Arch Immediate Loading Rehabilitations of the Maxilla
by Francesco Bagnasco, Paolo Pesce, Domenico Baldi, Francesco Motta, Francesco Pera, Nicola De Angelis and Maria Menini
Dent. J. 2024, 12(5), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12050131 - 8 May 2024
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Abstract
Background: Coaxial implants with an inclined neck might overcome some problems related to angulation of the implant axis when using tilted implants. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to conduct a narrative review of the current literature and to present a [...] Read more.
Background: Coaxial implants with an inclined neck might overcome some problems related to angulation of the implant axis when using tilted implants. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to conduct a narrative review of the current literature and to present a case series comparing traditional and coaxial external hex implants in full-arch immediate loading rehabilitations of the maxilla. Methods: A total of 13 external hex tapered implants (Southern Implants) was inserted in the upper jaw of 3 patients. Each patient received two tilted implants in distal sites. In one randomly selected quadrant, the tilted implant was a standard implant, while a Co-Axis® implant with a 24° inclination of the implant shoulder was inserted on the other hemi-arch. Straight conical abutments were screwed on coaxial implants while multiunit abutments of appropriate inclination were screwed as needed on the other implants to correct their axes. Peri-implant bone level was recorded radiographically at T0 (delivery of the immediate loading prosthesis), and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months of healing and then annually. Plaque index, probing depth, and bleeding on probing were also evaluated. Cumulative implant survival rate (CSR) was calculated, and biological or technical complications were recorded as well as the operator satisfaction towards the use of coaxial implants. Results: The preliminary data collected did not show significant differences in peri-implant tissues health and maintenance over time between the two implant types. No implants failed, and both implant types proved to be favorable for full-arch rehabilitation using tilted implants. Coaxial implants facilitated the prosthodontic procedures. However, a learning curve is required in order to optimize their insertion. Conclusions: Both implants proved to be reliable and suitable for achieving clinical success in full-arch immediate loading rehabilitations, but further research with longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to confirm these preliminary outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research on Oral Cancer and Dental Implants)
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17 pages, 1977 KiB  
Systematic Review
Success Rates of Zygomatic Implants for the Rehabilitation of Severely Atrophic Maxilla: A Systematic Review
by Aleix Solà Pérez, David Pastorino, Carlos Aparicio, Marta Pegueroles Neyra, Rabia Sannam Khan, Simon Wright and Cemal Ucer
Dent. J. 2022, 10(8), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10080151 - 12 Aug 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3660
Abstract
Zygomatic implants are a treatment solution for patients with severe maxillary atrophy. This treatment option allows delivering immediate fixed teeth within 24 h. Numerous peer-reviewed publications have reported different success rates, resulting in a disagreement on the topic. Therefore, the overall efficacy and [...] Read more.
Zygomatic implants are a treatment solution for patients with severe maxillary atrophy. This treatment option allows delivering immediate fixed teeth within 24 h. Numerous peer-reviewed publications have reported different success rates, resulting in a disagreement on the topic. Therefore, the overall efficacy and predictability of this rehabilitation is still a matter of discussion. With this study, we aimed to identify the published literature on the use of zygomatic implants for the reconstruction of the severely atrophic maxilla and report the cumulative success rate (CSR) as a function of follow-up time. A systematic review of the literature on zygomatic implant for the treatment of severe maxillary atrophy was performed and 196 publications were included in the study. The cumulative success rate of zygomatic implants for the treatment of severe maxillary atrophy was 98.5% at less than 1 year, 97.5% between 1 and 3 years, 96.8% between 3 and 5 years and 96.1% after more than 5 years. The most commonly reported complications were soft tissue dehiscence, rhinosinusitis and prosthetic failures. The treatment of severe lack of bone in the upper maxilla with zygomatic implants is a safe procedure, reaching a cumulative success rate of 96.1% after more than 5 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research on Oral Cancer and Dental Implants)
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