Current Research Topics in Orthodontics

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Restorative Dentistry and Traumatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 July 2024 | Viewed by 6464

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Orthodontics, Maurice and Gabriela Goldschlager, School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Interests: orthodontics; tooth movement; diagnosis; treatment outcomes and efficacy; artificial intelligence in orthodontics
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

I have accepted the task of guest editing this Special Issue entitled “Current Research Topics in Orthodontics”. It is my intent that this issue will expand and advance our knowledge of the specialty of Orthodontics.

I would very much like this issue to encompass the latest research on clinical, basic science, and technological advances in Orthodontics.

I look forward to receiving your manuscript(s) in order to fulfill these aspirations.

Dr. Moshe Davidovitch
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biology of tooth movement
  • treatment outcomes
  • 3D printing
  • 3D imaging
  • biomechanics
  • evidence-based
  • device innovation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 919 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Effects of Carriere Motion Appliance and Twin Block Appliances in Class II Correction—A Retrospective Study
by Gilad Har Zion, Eyal Katzhendler, Amal Bader Farraj, Miryam Rabin and Shmuel Einy
Dent. J. 2024, 12(5), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12050119 - 23 Apr 2024
Viewed by 639
Abstract
This retrospective study compared Class II orthodontic non-extraction treatment using Carriere Motion Appliance (CMA) and Twin Block (TB) appliances. Methods: The treatment of 38 patients was assessed. Pre- and post-treatment cephalometric radiographs were analyzed to evaluate skeletal, dental, and soft tissue treatment outcomes [...] Read more.
This retrospective study compared Class II orthodontic non-extraction treatment using Carriere Motion Appliance (CMA) and Twin Block (TB) appliances. Methods: The treatment of 38 patients was assessed. Pre- and post-treatment cephalometric radiographs were analyzed to evaluate skeletal, dental, and soft tissue treatment outcomes and efficacy. Results: Both appliances effectively corrected the Class II molar relationship. When measured at the distal aspect of the first molar, TB achieved 4.22 mm, while CMA had a 2.55 mm correction. When measured in the mesial aspect, the CMA achieved a 3.9 mm correction. The changes in SNB and ANB were statistically significant only in the TB group. The CMA appliance demonstrated statistically significantly less protrusion of the mandibular incisors and less upper incisor retrusion without vertical changes compared to the TB appliance. The TB demonstrated statistically significant lower lip protrusion compared to the CMA. Conclusion: The CMA corrects Class II malocclusions only by exerting a dentoalveolar influence and does not demonstrate the added effects associated with TB, such as elongation of lower facial height (LFH) and less loss of lower anchorage. Nonetheless, the correction in the TB group comprised both dentoalveolar and skeletal components. The CMA promotes a multidirectional upper and lower molar movement, and despite our 2D cephalometric analysis, we were able to estimate the extent of upper molar derotation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research Topics in Orthodontics)
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15 pages, 3453 KiB  
Article
GDF15 Contributes to the Regulation of the Mechanosensitive Responses of PdL Fibroblasts through the Modulation of IL-37
by Julia Steinmetz, Albert Stemmler, Christoph-Ludwig Hennig, Judit Symmank and Collin Jacobs
Dent. J. 2024, 12(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12020039 - 13 Feb 2024
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Abstract
During orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), areas of compressive and tensile forces are generated in the periodontal ligament (PdL), a mechanoreactive connective tissue between the teeth and alveolar bone. Mechanically stimulated PdL fibroblasts (PdLFs), the main cell type of PdL, express significantly increased levels [...] Read more.
During orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), areas of compressive and tensile forces are generated in the periodontal ligament (PdL), a mechanoreactive connective tissue between the teeth and alveolar bone. Mechanically stimulated PdL fibroblasts (PdLFs), the main cell type of PdL, express significantly increased levels of growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15). In compressed PdL areas, GDF15 plays a fundamental role in modulating relevant OTM processes, including inflammation and osteoclast activation. However, the specific function of this factor in tensile areas has not yet been investigated. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of GDF15 in the mechanoresponse of human PdLFs (hPdLFs) that were exposed to biaxial tensile forces in vitro. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments, we demonstrated that GDF15 had no impact on the anti-inflammatory force response of elongated hPdLFs. Although the anti-inflammatory markers IL1RN and IL10, as well as the activation of immune cells remained unaffected, we demonstrated an inhibitory role of GDF15 for the IL-37 expression. By analyzing osteogenic markers, including ALPL and RUNX2, along with an assessment of alkaline phosphatase activation, we further showed that the regulation of IL-37 by GDF15 modulates the osteogenic differentiation potential of hPdLFs. Despite bone resorption in tensile areas being rather limited, GDF15 was also found to positively modulate osteoclast activation in those areas, potentially by adjusting the IL-37 levels. In light of our new findings, we hypothesize that GDF15 modulates force-induced processes in tissue and bone remodeling through its various intra- and extracellular signaling pathways as well as interaction partners. Potentially acting as a master regulator, the modulation of GDF15 levels may hold relevance for clinical implications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research Topics in Orthodontics)
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12 pages, 746 KiB  
Article
Upper Airway Dimensions among Different Skeletal Malocclusions: A Retrospective Observational Study by Cephalometric Analysis
by Maria Francesca Sfondrini, Simone Gallo, Maurizio Pascadopoli, Paola Gandini, Caterina Roncoroni and Andrea Scribante
Dent. J. 2024, 12(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12010012 - 3 Jan 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1903
Abstract
The aim of the present work was to investigate the upper airway dimensions in adult non-orthodontic patients, equally divided according to their skeletal class. Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, lateral cephalometric radiographs of adult patients referred for orthodontic consultation were collected. Cephalometric [...] Read more.
The aim of the present work was to investigate the upper airway dimensions in adult non-orthodontic patients, equally divided according to their skeletal class. Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, lateral cephalometric radiographs of adult patients referred for orthodontic consultation were collected. Cephalometric tracing was performed with dedicated software. For each measure, descriptive statistics were calculated. Cephalometric measurements between the different skeletal classes were compared. Linear regressions were performed between upper airway diameters and cephalometric measurements, sex and age. Significance was predetermined for p < 0.05. Results: Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 120 patients were reviewed. Nasopharynx length (NL) and depth (PD) measurements were significantly shorter in skeletal class III patients (p < 0.05). The superior pharyngeal airway space (SPAS) was found to be significantly shorter in class III patients as compared to class II patients (p < 0.05), and the mean airway space (MAS) of class I patients was found to be significantly shorter compared to class II patients (p < 0.05). Palate length (PL) values were found to be significantly longer in class I (p < 0.05). Linear regressions showed that the sella-nasion-A point angle (SNA) and Riedel’s angle between point A, the nasion and point B (ANB) significantly influenced NL and PD (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Class III patients show significantly shorter nasopharynx measurements; clinicians should consider that this sagittal discrepancy could be related to an altered anatomy of the upper respiratory tract. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research Topics in Orthodontics)
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13 pages, 472 KiB  
Review
Graphene-Based Coatings for Surface Modification and Their Applications in Fixed Orthodontics: A Scoping Review
by Arturo Garrocho-Rangel, Juan Carlos Flores-Arriaga, Cristina Zamora-Soberón, Alan Martínez-Zumarán, Socorro Ruiz-Rodríguez and Amaury Pozos-Guillén
Dent. J. 2023, 11(12), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11120285 - 11 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1542
Abstract
Background: Surface coating technology can assist fixed appliances by reducing friction, improving antibacterial characteristics, and increasing corrosion resistance. The application of functional coatings composed of graphene onto the surfaces of orthodontic brackets and archwires has been shown to enhance their mechanical qualities. The [...] Read more.
Background: Surface coating technology can assist fixed appliances by reducing friction, improving antibacterial characteristics, and increasing corrosion resistance. The application of functional coatings composed of graphene onto the surfaces of orthodontic brackets and archwires has been shown to enhance their mechanical qualities. The objective of the current study was to carry out a scoping analysis of published recent evidence on the utilization of graphene as a covering material in metallic orthodontic accessories, such as brackets and archwires; Methods: A scoping review was undertaken following the PRISMA-ScR guidelines. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Dentistry and Oral Science Source, and Google Scholar were searched between 2003 and 2023; Results: In total, 38 potential references were detected, from which 10 were selected for this review. These articles addressed the benefits of the application of graphene-oxide functional coatings onto the surface of archwires and brackets during fixed orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic graphene-oxide-based coatings provide improved surface characteristics (e.g., reduced friction and anticorrosive effects), antibacterial capabilities, and biocompatibility. These characteristics can increase the effectiveness of orthodontic therapy, improve patient comfort, and lower the likelihood of problems; Conclusion: Orthodontists should be aware of and comprehend the prerequisites for using graphene-oxide-coated archwires and brackets to fulfill needs throughout their clinical practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research Topics in Orthodontics)
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