Current Advances in Pediatric Odontology

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 September 2024 | Viewed by 6170

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Centre for Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine, Philipps University of Marburg, Georg-Voigt-Strasse 3, D-35033 Marburg, Germany
Interests: prevention; epidemiology; questionnaires; cariology; caries diagnostics; caries management; dental anxiety; molar incisor hypoplasia (MIH)

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Guest Editor
Department of Special Care Dentistry, Witten/Herdecke University, Alfred-Herrhausen-Strasse 50, 58455 Witten, Germany
Interests: special care dentistry; oral epidemiology; prevention; fluorides; cariology; healthcare research; rare diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The caries burden of children and adolescents in industrialized countries has been reduced in recent decades. Between 1994 and 2020, for example, the incidence of caries in 12-year-olds in Central Europe was reduced by more than 80%. This resulted in less need for invasive restorative therapies in the permanent dentition. As a result, the focus of pediatric dentistry was increasingly directed towards other disease patterns, such as severe early childhood caries (sECC) and molar incisor hypoplasia (MIH).

Gentle caries management based on modern methods of caries diagnosis and minimally invasive intervention with the aim of largely preserving healthy tooth structure has also become increasingly important in recent years. However, children and young people with disabilities, chronic diseases and/or rare diseases have benefited much less or not at all from this trend. The dental care of this population group represents a particular challenge for dentists.

These positive developments give reason to collect and publish various papers on the subject in a Special Issue with the topic “Current Advances in Pediatric Odontology”. The focus is on epidemiological trends, on the development and optimization of prevention programs for small children, school children and risk groups, including chronically ill and otherwise disadvantaged children. Updates to procedures for the reconstruction of deciduous and permanent teeth should also be taken into account. Finally, the diagnosis and assessment of dental fear and how to deal with it in children also plays an important role.

For a large proportion of children and young people with disabilities, dental care in cooperation with other health care providers also includes improving tongue and swallowing function.

Prof. Dr. Klaus Pieper
Prof. Dr. Andreas G. Schulte
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • prevention
  • fluorides
  • oral epidemiology
  • cariology
  • caries diagnostics
  • caries management
  • dental anxiety
  • molar incisor hypoplasia (MIH)
  • special care dentistry
  • healthcare research
  • rare diseases

Published Papers (4 papers)

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10 pages, 557 KiB  
Article
Possible Etiological Factors for the Development of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) in Austrian Children
by Sarra Altner, Ivan Milutinovic and Katrin Bekes
Dent. J. 2024, 12(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12030044 - 20 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Background: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental enamel defect that primarily affects the first permanent molars and sometimes the incisors. Its increasing prevalence worldwide has raised clinical concerns, yet its exact cause remains unknown. This study aimed to assess potential factors influencing [...] Read more.
Background: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental enamel defect that primarily affects the first permanent molars and sometimes the incisors. Its increasing prevalence worldwide has raised clinical concerns, yet its exact cause remains unknown. This study aimed to assess potential factors influencing MIH development by analyzing the medical history of children aged 6 to 12 years using a questionnaire. Methods: This study included 100 children aged 6–12 years diagnosed with MIH during dental examination, and 100 age-matched children in the non-MIH (healthy) group from the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna. The parents of the participants completed a two-page questionnaire regarding possible etiological factors of MIH. Results: The data analysis involved 100 children with MIH (mean age 8.5; ±1.3; 52% female) and 100 children in the healthy group (mean age 9.2; ±1.3; 42% female). The optimized binary logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between MIH development and cesarean-section delivery (OR = 3; CI = [1.5–6.2]) and sixth disease (roseola) (OR = 3.5; CI = [1.5–8.0]). Conclusions: This study suggests that cesarean-section delivery and sixth disease (roseola) might increase the likelihood of MIH development in children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Advances in Pediatric Odontology)
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10 pages, 597 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Dental Anxiety in Children: Reliability and Validity of the Questionnaire to Assess Dental Anxiety in Children (QADA-C)
by Jutta Margraf-Stiksrud and Klaus Pieper
Dent. J. 2024, 12(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12020023 - 26 Jan 2024
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Abstract
This study presents a measure to assess dental anxiety in children. To gain a better understanding of children’s fear and anxiety in the dental setting, instruments to gather data with high quality are necessary and missing, especially in the German language. Based upon [...] Read more.
This study presents a measure to assess dental anxiety in children. To gain a better understanding of children’s fear and anxiety in the dental setting, instruments to gather data with high quality are necessary and missing, especially in the German language. Based upon the facet approach, the Questionnaire to Assess Dental Anxiety in Children (QADA-C) includes items concerning anxiety reactions in thinking, behavior, and feelings in the form of short statements. The item formulation was adapted for children of the target age (9–11 years), and items were presented with pictures of dental situations. Item and reliability analyses in a sample of 1019 children showed the good quality of the instrument (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.89), and the validity indicators revealed its ability to differentiate high-anxiety, low-anxiety, and non-anxious children with an overall sum score. This score was proven to correlate with oral health criteria (decayed/missing/filled teeth, oral health behavior, oral health knowledge). Its easy administration and appropriateness for children make the questionnaire applicable in the dental office for clinical purposes as well as in research contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Advances in Pediatric Odontology)
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10 pages, 2023 KiB  
Article
Improving the Communication of Dental Findings in Pediatric Dentistry by Using Intraoral Scans as a Visual Aid: A Randomized Clinical Trial
by Nelly Schulz-Weidner, Marina Gruber, Eva May Schraml, Bernd Wöstmann, Norbert Krämer and Maximiliane Amelie Schlenz
Dent. J. 2024, 12(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12010015 - 17 Jan 2024
Viewed by 2285
Abstract
The aim of this first randomized clinical trial (RCT) was to determine whether intraoral scans (IOS) can be used as a visual aid to improve the communication of dental findings in pediatric dentistry. Therefore, 60 children (mean age 10.1 ± 3.3 years) and [...] Read more.
The aim of this first randomized clinical trial (RCT) was to determine whether intraoral scans (IOS) can be used as a visual aid to improve the communication of dental findings in pediatric dentistry. Therefore, 60 children (mean age 10.1 ± 3.3 years) and their accompanying parents/primary caregivers (PGs) were examined between July 2022 and February 2023. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups: half of the participants were informed of the children’s dental findings including treatment plans by verbal explanation alone (control group, n = 30), while the other half were informed using IOS (Trios 4, 3Shape) as a visual aid to support the verbal explanation (study group, n = 30). Both groups then completed a questionnaire regarding their children’s diagnosis, treatment needs, planned therapy, and oral hygiene. Statistical analysis was performed using a t-test (p < 0.05). Overall, there was a significant difference between the two groups (p < 0.001) in terms of understanding the current oral situation of their children. While 85.5 ± 17.3% (mean ± standard deviation) of the answers were correct in the study group, only 57.2 ± 17.8% of the participants in the control group were capable of answering the questions correctly. In particular, the control group had difficulties answering the questions about treatment needs and therapy correctly. Within the limitations of this first pilot study, IOS can be clearly recommended as a visual aid to improve the communication of dental findings with PGs in pediatric dentistry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Advances in Pediatric Odontology)
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15 pages, 25720 KiB  
Case Report
Full-Mouth Rehabilitation of a 15-Year-Old Girl Affected by a Rare Hypoparathyroidism (Glial Cell Missing Homolog 2 Mutation): A 3-Year Follow-Up
by Yohann Flottes, Eléonore Valleron, Bruno Gogly, Claudine Wulfman and Elisabeth Dursun
Dent. J. 2024, 12(5), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12050130 - 7 May 2024
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Abstract
Objective: Familial isolated hypoparathyroidism is a rare genetic disorder due to no or low production of the parathyroid hormone, disturbing calcium and phosphate regulation. The resulting hypocalcemia may lead to dental abnormalities, such as enamel hypoplasia. The aim of this paper was to [...] Read more.
Objective: Familial isolated hypoparathyroidism is a rare genetic disorder due to no or low production of the parathyroid hormone, disturbing calcium and phosphate regulation. The resulting hypocalcemia may lead to dental abnormalities, such as enamel hypoplasia. The aim of this paper was to describe the full-mouth rehabilitation of a 15-year-old girl with chronic hypocalcemia due to a rare congenital hypoparathyroidism. Clinical considerations: In this patient, in the young adult dentition, conservative care was preferred. Onlays or stainless-steel crowns were performed on the posterior teeth, and direct or indirect (overlays and veneerlays) were performed on the maxillary premolars, canines, and incisors, using a digital wax-up. The mandibular incisors were bleached. The treatment clearly improved the patient’s oral quality of life, with fewer sensitivities, better chewing, and aesthetic satisfaction. The difficulties were the regular monitoring and the limited compliance of the patient. Conclusion: Despite no clinical feedback in the literature, generalized hypomineralized/hypoplastic teeth due to hypoparathyroidism in a young patient can be treated as amelogenesis imperfecta (generalized enamel defects) with a conservative approach for medium-term satisfactory results. Highlights: This study provides new insights into the management of enamel hypoplasia caused by familial isolated hypoparathyroidism, helping to improve patient outcomes in similar cases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Advances in Pediatric Odontology)
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