Endodontics: From Technique to Regeneration

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 7075

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77054, USA
Interests: endodontics; root canal system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Root canal treatment has always been a very challenging dental treatment. Our main goal to preserve teeth means that the science of endodontics must keep moving forward, looking for new strategies and technologies to help to tackle a range of challenging situations, from preserving the radicular formation of the tooth by promoting revascularization techniques to finding new ways to treat the very complex root canal system and root canal obturation. New strategies to treat failed root canal treatment are also of paramount importance. 

This Special Issue aims to promote research with the aim of understanding the process of revascularization techniques, root canal instrumentation, new root canal irrigation technology, and root canal obturation techniques and materials, as well as retreatment options. Case reports that allow a better understanding of challenging clinical cases are also invited.

Prof. Dr. David E. Jaramillo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • revascularization
  • root canal instrumentation
  • root canal retreatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 8522 KiB  
Article
40-Year Outcome of Old-School, Non-Surgical Endodontic Treatment: Practice-Based Retrospective Evaluation
by Roland Frankenberger, Stephan Becker, Benedicta Beck-Broichsitter, Susanne Albrecht-Hass, Charlotte J. Behrens, Matthias J. Roggendorf and Andreas Koch
Dent. J. 2024, 12(4), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12040090 - 1 Apr 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: Non-surgical endodontic treatment has been shown to be clinically successful; however, clinical long-term data are scarce. This practice-based retrospective clinical investigation evaluated endodontic outcomes over 40 years and identified relevant clinical co-factors. (2) Methods: Two experienced dental practitioners in two different [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Non-surgical endodontic treatment has been shown to be clinically successful; however, clinical long-term data are scarce. This practice-based retrospective clinical investigation evaluated endodontic outcomes over 40 years and identified relevant clinical co-factors. (2) Methods: Two experienced dental practitioners in two different private dental practices treated 174 patients with 245 teeth from 1969 to 1993. After root canal obturation, either a new direct restoration (amalgam, resin composite, or glass-ionomer cement) or the re-cementation of a pre-existing prosthetic restoration or renewal of prosthetic restoration followed. Metal posts (operator A) or metal screws (operator B) were inserted when coronal substance loss was significant. The primary outcome (i.e., tooth survival) was achieved when the endodontically treated tooth was, in situ, painless and had full function at the end of the observation period. A secondary outcome, the impact of different prognostic factors on survival rate, was evaluated. (3) Results: The overall mean survival was 56.1% of all treated teeth after 40 years of clinical service, resulting in an annual failure rate of 1.1%. Most investigated clinical co-factors (jaw, tooth position, intracanal dressings, post/screw placement, and gender) showed no significant influence on survival. (4) Conclusions: Even with materials and techniques from the 1970s and 1980s, successful root canal treatment was achievable. Except for post-endodontic restorations, most of the evaluated factors had no significant influence on the clinical long-term survival of root canal-treated teeth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endodontics: From Technique to Regeneration)
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11 pages, 1387 KiB  
Article
Comparative Analysis of Endodontic 0.15 Stainless-Steel K-Files: Exploring Design, Composition, and Mechanical Performance
by Abayomi Omokeji Baruwa, Filipa Chasqueira, Sofia Arantes-Oliveira, João Caramês, Duarte Marques, Jaime Portugal and Jorge N. R. Martins
Dent. J. 2024, 12(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12020029 - 31 Jan 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1418
Abstract
To establish a glide path, smaller files (up to size 0.15) with tapers of 2% are commonly used as pathfinding files. They pre-shape the root canal space before transitioning to larger taper endodontic instruments, aiming to prevent procedural errors. This study aimed to [...] Read more.
To establish a glide path, smaller files (up to size 0.15) with tapers of 2% are commonly used as pathfinding files. They pre-shape the root canal space before transitioning to larger taper endodontic instruments, aiming to prevent procedural errors. This study aimed to compare the design, metal wire composition, and mechanical characteristics of seven different ISO size 15 stainless-steel hand files (K-File and C-File+). Ninety-one new stainless-steel ISO 15 K-files were mechanically tested. All files were inspected for deformations before the assessment. Dental operating microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and optical microscope analyses were conducted on four randomly selected instruments from each group, and two instruments per group underwent an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. Buckling mechanical tests were performed using an Instron universal testing machine, and microhardness was assessed using a Vickers hardness tester. The statistical analysis employed the nonparametric Mood’s median test, with a significance level set at 0.05. The instrument design analysis unveiled variations in the active blade area length and the number of spirals, while maintaining consistent cross-sections and symmetrical blades. Distinct tip geometries and surface irregularities were observed. While the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed similar compositions, the buckling strength and microhardness values exhibited variability across for all tested files. Notably, the Dentsply ReadySteel C-File+ recorded the highest buckling value (2.10 N), and the Dentsply ReadySteel K-File exhibited the lowest (1.00 N) (p < 0.05). Moreover, the Dentsply ReadySteel K-File recorded the highest microhardness value (703 HVN), while the SybronEndo Triple-Flex had the lowest (549 HVN) (p < 0.05). While similarities in cross-section design and metal wire composition were noted among the files, variations in the number of spirals and mechanical performance were also observed. Thus, all of these factors should be considered when selecting suitable files for an efficient root canal treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endodontics: From Technique to Regeneration)
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10 pages, 1630 KiB  
Article
Effect of Dentin Conditioning with EDTA and Diode Lasers on Expression of Odontoblast-like Cell Markers of Dental Pulp Stem Cells
by Gabriela Martín, Valentín Preve, Kenneth Hargreaves, Anibal Diogenes, Carolina Inostroza, Nicole Saint-Jean and Claudia Brizuela
Dent. J. 2023, 11(9), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11090210 - 4 Sep 2023
Viewed by 2320
Abstract
Regenerative endodontic procedures rely on the delivery of mesenchymal stem cells into the root canal and on the effect of local growth factors from the dentin and blood clot. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dentin conditioning with [...] Read more.
Regenerative endodontic procedures rely on the delivery of mesenchymal stem cells into the root canal and on the effect of local growth factors from the dentin and blood clot. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dentin conditioning with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diode lasers with different wavelengths (808 nm and 980 nm) on the expression of odontoblast-like cell markers. Forty dentin cylinders were divided into four groups according to the irrigation protocol: EDTA, EDTA + 808 nm diode laser, EDTA + 980 nm diode laser, and phosphate-buffered saline as the control group. Dental pulp stem cells were seeded into the previously conditioned cylinders and incubated for 14 days. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin morphoprotein-1 (DMP-1), and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1). Data analysis was performed using the Kruskal–Wallis test. The activation of EDTA with 980 nm and 808 nm diode lasers resulted in lower DSPP and DMP-1 expression than that for EDTA alone (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). The expression of TGF was similar among all groups. The highest level of expression of odontoblast-like differentiation markers was observed with EDTA alone. However, the use of an 808 nm diode laser during EDTA irrigation reduced the expression of odontoblastic differentiation markers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endodontics: From Technique to Regeneration)
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Review

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12 pages, 457 KiB  
Review
Retreatment Strategies for Cases Containing Calcium Silicate-Based Root Canal Sealers: A Comprehensive Review
by Hussain Al akam, Hyeon-Cheol Kim and Ji Wook Jeong
Dent. J. 2024, 12(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12020041 - 18 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1958
Abstract
This review explores the field of retreatment strategies for cases filled with calcium silicate-based root canal sealers. Since the introduction of calcium silicate-based materials in dentistry, calcium silicate-based root canal sealers have become popular among dentists because of their biocompatibility, bioactivity, and sealing [...] Read more.
This review explores the field of retreatment strategies for cases filled with calcium silicate-based root canal sealers. Since the introduction of calcium silicate-based materials in dentistry, calcium silicate-based root canal sealers have become popular among dentists because of their biocompatibility, bioactivity, and sealing ability. Therefore, effective retreatment strategies are indispensable. This article aims to identify the challenges associated with the removal of calcium silicate-based sealers themselves and removal of gutta-percha with the sealers during retreatment, evaluate current techniques and materials, and provide future directions for research in this field. Regarding the strategies of removal of root canal sealers, calcium silicate-based sealers are still relatively new materials for clinicians compared with traditional sealers such as epoxy- or eugenol-based sealers. First, no clinically established solvents have been reported. Second, calcium silicate-based sealers are currently utilized by clinicians in either the cold sealer-based technique or the warm vertical condensation technique. Third, the setting process of calcium silicate-based sealers generates byproducts, primarily calcium hydroxide and secondarily hydroxyapatite, that could interact with dentine. Lastly, there is a lack of clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of retreatment protocols for teeth filled with calcium silicate-based sealers. Therefore, it is important to investigate the chemo-mechanical properties of calcium silicate-based sealers themselves and their reactions to solvents and/or mechanical instruments and identify the interfacial properties of calcium silicate-based sealers with respect to dentine and gutta-percha. In addition, researchers in the clinical field need to actively gather and report data on retreatments of teeth filled with calcium silicate-based sealers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endodontics: From Technique to Regeneration)
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