Digital Dentures

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 13511

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Gunduliceva 5, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: digital dentures; complete denture materials; occlusal splints; occlusion; mechanical properties of dental materials; jaw tracking devices; temporomandibular joint

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Guest Editor
School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Gunduliceva 5, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: dental practice; prosthodontics; orofacial pain; oral health

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Gunduliceva 5, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: dentistry; prosthodontics

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Digital technology is changing our practice every day, especially in prosthodontics, with 3D printers and scanners becoming an integral part of the routine workflow. Fixed dental prostheses are hard to imagine without CAD/CAM technology, both additive and subtractive, and the approach to removable complete and partial dentures has also evolved. The most recent literature describes many new protocols, materials, suggestions, and applications of digital technology in the fabrication of removable complete dentures.

Today’s rapid technological evolution makes it hard for both researchers and clinicians to keep up with the latest developments, and a lack of research poses potential challenges to integrating novel technologies in the custom workflow. The research process, which ends with manuscript publication, takes considerable time. Due to this unavoidable delay, the publication of independent studies will always somewhat lag behind the appearance of novel technologies and materials.

The upcoming Special Issue focuses on novel technologies and materials for removable complete denture fabrication and aims to provide a clinical and scientific update. We cordially invite all contributors to present new studies, systematic reviews, and narrative reviews focused on digital dentures.

Possible topics for this Special Issue include but are not limited to:

  • Milled dentures;
  • 3D-printed dentures;
  • Occlusion;
  • Virtual articulator;
  • Digital impression;
  • CAD/CAM denture materials;
  • Acrylic resin;
  • Polyamide resin;
  • Denture teeth materials;
  • Mechanical properties of digital denture materials;
  • Occlusal splint;
  • Digital denture fabrication protocol;
  • Systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

Dr. Samir Čimić
Prof. Dr. Tomislav Badel
Prof. Dr. Robert Ćelić
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • digital prosthodontics
  • digital dentures
  • complete denture
  • additive and subtractive manufacturing
  • dental materials
  • acrylic resin
  • CAD/CAM
  • denture teeth
  • digital impression
  • occlusal splint
  • virtual articulator

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 1927 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Comparison of Three Intraoral Scanners for Implant—Supported Dental Prostheses
by Vitória Costa, António Sérgio Silva, Rosana Costa, Pedro Barreiros, Joana Mendes and José Manuel Mendes
Dent. J. 2022, 10(6), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10060112 - 15 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3848
Abstract
With continuing technological developments, there have been advances in the field of fixed prosthetics, particularly in impression-taking techniques. These technological advances mean that a wide variety of diagnostic and/or rehabilitation possibilities can be explored without the need for physical models. The aim of [...] Read more.
With continuing technological developments, there have been advances in the field of fixed prosthetics, particularly in impression-taking techniques. These technological advances mean that a wide variety of diagnostic and/or rehabilitation possibilities can be explored without the need for physical models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of three intraoral scanners used in oral implant rehabilitation using an extraoral scanner as a reference and varying the scanning area. Three models representing different clinical scenarios were scanned 15 times by each intraoral scanner and three times by the extraoral scanner. The readings were analyzed and overlaid using engineering software (Geomagic® Control X software (Artec Europe, Luxembourg)). Statistically significant differences in accuracy were found between the three intraoral scanners, iTero® (Align Technology Inc., San Jose, CA, USA), Medit® (Medit®: Seoul, Korea), and Planmeca® (Planmeca®: Helsinki, Finland). In all clinical scenarios, the iTero® scanner had the best trueness (24.4 μm), followed by the Medit® (26.4 μm) and Planmeca® (42.1 μm). The Medit® showed the best precision (18.00 μm) followed by the iTero® (19.20 μm) and Planmeca® (34.30 μm). We concluded that the iTero® scanner had the highest reproducibility and accuracy in the clinical setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Dentures)
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15 pages, 4956 KiB  
Article
Digital Dental Models: Is Photogrammetry an Alternative to Dental Extraoral and Intraoral Scanners?
by Francesca Zotti, Luca Rosolin, Massimo Bersani, Andrea Poscolere, Davide Pappalardo and Nicoletta Zerman
Dent. J. 2022, 10(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10020024 - 7 Feb 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3711
Abstract
Background: 3D models are nowadays part of daily clinical practice. Photogrammetry is a brand-new method for transforming small objects into 3D models while keeping their original shape and size. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, in terms of precision [...] Read more.
Background: 3D models are nowadays part of daily clinical practice. Photogrammetry is a brand-new method for transforming small objects into 3D models while keeping their original shape and size. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, in terms of precision and trueness, of a digital dental model acquired with photogrammetry compared with those obtained using extraoral scanners and intraoral scanners, starting from the same plaster model. Methods: A plaster model was converted into a digital model using photogrammetry, an extraoral scanner and an intraoral scanner. Different references were measured twice at a distance of 30 min for each model, on the digital models using the software Blender and on the plaster model using a calibre. The Interclass Correlation Coefficient was calculated for each pair of measurements. A volumetric analysis was performed by superimposing the digital models. The coefficient of variation was calculated. A two-way ANOVA test was conducted. Results: For each reference, the coefficient of variation was less than 3%, and the two ANOVA tests resulted in a non-significant value in both cases (p > 0.05). The volumetric analysis demonstrated good agreement between the models derived from the different acquisition methods. Conclusions: Photogrammetry seems to be a good method for acquiring digital models starting from a plaster model, all the methods tested seem to be good for obtaining an accurate three-dimensional digital model. Other studies are needed to evaluate clinical efficacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Dentures)
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Review

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11 pages, 593 KiB  
Review
The Shear Bond Strength between Milled Denture Base Materials and Artificial Teeth: A Systematic Review
by Vladimir Prpic, Amir Catic, Sonja Kraljevic Simunkovic, Lana Bergman and Samir Cimic
Dent. J. 2023, 11(3), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11030066 - 1 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2086
Abstract
The data about bond strength between digitally produced denture base resins and artificial teeth are scarce. Several studies investigated shear bond strength values of milled denture base resins and different types of artificial teeth. The purpose of the present study was to compare [...] Read more.
The data about bond strength between digitally produced denture base resins and artificial teeth are scarce. Several studies investigated shear bond strength values of milled denture base resins and different types of artificial teeth. The purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the available evidence through a systematic review. A bibliographic search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science to assess adequate studies published up to 1 June 2022. This review followed the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. The appropriate studies that determined the shear bond strength values between milled denture base resins and artificial teeth were selected. The initial search identified 103 studies, which were included in the PRISMA 2020 flow diagram for new systematic reviews. Three studies met the inclusion criteria, and all of them present a moderate risk of bias (score 6). Two studies found no statistical differences between heat-polymerized and CAD/CAM (milled) denture base materials when attached with different types of artificial teeth, while one study showed higher values of CAD/CAM (milled) denture base materials. Bonding agents ensure bonding strength at least similar to the conventional methods. In order to improve the quality of future studies, it would be advantageous to use a larger number of specimens with standardized dimensions and a blinded testing machine operator to decrease the risk of bias. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Dentures)
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Other

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12 pages, 5239 KiB  
Case Report
Digital Workflow for Edentulous Patients with Implant-Supported Fixed Prostheses: A Fully Digital Technique
by Seung Wook Jung, Yi-Qin Fan and Chunui Lee
Dent. J. 2022, 10(9), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10090174 - 15 Sep 2022
Viewed by 2910
Abstract
Dentists have made prostheses using traditional methods, which are inconvenient and time-consuming. It includes functional impression taking, plaster model production, wax rim production, intermaxillary relationship and occlusal plane setting, artificial tooth arrangement, denture polymerization, polishing, etc. To make prostheses in this way, the [...] Read more.
Dentists have made prostheses using traditional methods, which are inconvenient and time-consuming. It includes functional impression taking, plaster model production, wax rim production, intermaxillary relationship and occlusal plane setting, artificial tooth arrangement, denture polymerization, polishing, etc. To make prostheses in this way, the patient has to visit the dentist several times, and it takes a long time for them to receive treatment. In addition, the potential for errors associated with the denture-manufacturing process and the use of denture materials has always existed. However, the recent use of digital technology in dentistry has made it possible to create digital prostheses. Several techniques for the immediate loading of implants with a fixed prostheses in edentulous patients have been developed. However, these techniques are partially digital techniques that include laboratory work for prosthesis fabrication. This article aimed to describe a fully digital technique for implant-supported fixed prostheses. It includes intra-oral scanning of edentulous patients, implant placement planning, and final prosthesis fabrication. This technique facilitates a simple and more efficient immediate restoration after implant placement without using stone casts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Dentures)
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