Clinical Oral Implants and Periodontal Research

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 January 2023) | Viewed by 27356

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
Interests: biocompatibility; bone; biomaterial science; biomaterial engineering; biomaterials; tissue engineering; implant dentistry; tissue regeneration; bone regeneration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Osseointegrated dental implants have been proven to solve problems associated with oral rehabilitation and have shown improved results in dentistry. However, some requirements for implant placement and success are bone quantity and quality; a correct diagnosis and treatment plan; and the application of digital tools, which have currently enhanced the precision of the results obtained. Thus, oral rehabilitation has continually been investigated, and new devices, biomaterials, and procedures have emerged—or have been compared—in order to improve quality of life. Moreover, esthetic results have been requested by patients, and soft grafts and new materials are being studied to achieve suitable and comprehensive results.

Within this background, this Special Issue would like to gather the best of implantology and periodontology, from basic research to advanced oral rehabilitation, showing digital technologies, surgical approaches, and reconstructions.

Authors conducting studies on these themes are welcome to submit original research, reviews, and short communications, case series, and case reports.

Dr. Gustavo Fernandes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • implant dentistry
  • periodontics
  • grafts
  • digital
  • rehabilitation
  • grafts
  • biomaterial
  • surgical approach
  • prosthetic procedure

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

10 pages, 2404 KiB  
Article
A 3D Digital Analysis of the Hard Palate Wound Healing after Free Gingival Graft Harvest: A Pilot Study in the Short Term
by Tiago Marques, Sara Ramos, Nuno Bernardo Malta dos Santos, Tiago Borges, Javier Montero, André Correia and Gustavo Vicentis de Oliveira Fernandes
Dent. J. 2022, 10(6), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10060109 - 13 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2135
Abstract
Purpose: Within this context, this pilot study aimed to evaluate the healing dynamics process of the hard palate after free gingival graft harvesting in the short term (3 months), utilizing digital imaging technology and tridimensional analysis software. Furthermore, assessing the results found to [...] Read more.
Purpose: Within this context, this pilot study aimed to evaluate the healing dynamics process of the hard palate after free gingival graft harvesting in the short term (3 months), utilizing digital imaging technology and tridimensional analysis software. Furthermore, assessing the results found to verify the existence of a relationship between gender or age with tissue loss. Materials and Methods: For connective-tissue harvesting, fifteen patients with gingival recessions type (RT) 1 and RT2 were selected. On the surgery day (before the procedure) and after three months, palatal impressions were taken in all patients, and cast models were done for posterior model scanning. The following variables were analyzed: mean thickness alterations (x¯ TA), maximum thickness loss (MTL), mean maximum thickness loss (x¯ MTL), and volume alterations (VA). A descriptive and bivariate analysis of the data was done. The data were submitted for statistical evaluation and were significant if p < 0.05. Results: Fifteen patients were analyzed, 11 females (73.3%) and four males (26.7%). The patients’ average age was 28 ± 8.52 years (ranging between 16 and 48 years old). The palatal wound region’s mean thickness and volume changes were −0.26 mm (±0.31) and 46.99 mm3 (±47.47 mm3) at three months. There was no statistically significant result correlating age/gender with any variable evaluated. Conclusions: Connective tissue graft harvesting promoted changes with a standard volume and thickness loss of palatal soft tissue. A 3D digital evaluation was a non-invasive method with a reproducible technique for measuring thickness or volume after connective tissue is collected. There was no relationship between age/gender and any variables analyzed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Oral Implants and Periodontal Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 5578 KiB  
Article
A Novel Approach to Immediate Implants: The CastleWall Surgical Technique
by Cameron Castle
Dent. J. 2022, 10(4), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10040062 - 6 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2803
Abstract
Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the volumetric stability around immediate implants, in which a 360-degree socket-shield was retained using the CastleWall Surgical Technique (CWST). Material and methods: This retrospective study examined the results of the CWST used for 25 [...] Read more.
Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the volumetric stability around immediate implants, in which a 360-degree socket-shield was retained using the CastleWall Surgical Technique (CWST). Material and methods: This retrospective study examined the results of the CWST used for 25 consecutive patients, involving 31 immediate implants. Silicone impressions taken prior to extraction, and at a review appointment were converted to STL files and compared. The median follow-up time was 14.2 ± 5.5 months. Volumetric changes and gingival recession on both buccal and lingual sites were measured. Papillary height changes were also evaluated from available photographs taken before and after treatment. Patients in the study completed a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for evaluation of post-operative discomfort and overall satisfaction with this procedure. Results: All implants integrated successfully without complications. Mean loss of buccal and lingual tissue was 0.30 ± 0.32 mm and 0.17 ± 0.27 mm, respectively. Mean recession at the mid-buccal and mid-lingual gingival margin was 0.66 ± 0.64 mm and 0.87 ± 0.84 mm, respectively. Mean recession of the mesial and distal papilla was 0.26 ± 0.55 mm and 0.29 ± 0.52 mm, respectively. Patients reported 97.74 ± 5.60% satisfaction with this procedure using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), with minimal post-operative discomfort. Conclusions: The results of this study showed excellent soft tissue stability and aesthetics were achieved using the CWST, with minimal postoperative pain. The other main advantage of retaining a 360-degree socket-shield, is there is more available surface area to lock the implant to the shield to prevent shield migration over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Oral Implants and Periodontal Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

13 pages, 404 KiB  
Review
Effects of Multibracket Orthodontic Treatment versus Clear Aligners on Periodontal Health: An Integrative Review
by Aaron Jacob David Partouche, Filipe Castro, Ana Sofia Baptista, Liliana Gavinha Costa, Juliana Campos Hasse Fernandes and Gustavo Vicentis de Oliveira Fernandes
Dent. J. 2022, 10(10), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10100177 - 21 Sep 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2736
Abstract
Objective: This integrative review aimed to identify studies comparing the periodontal health in patients wearing multibracket orthodontic appliances and clear aligners. Materials and methods: An integrative literature search was performed through different databases, PubMed/Medline, PMC, and the Cochrane Library. This work [...] Read more.
Objective: This integrative review aimed to identify studies comparing the periodontal health in patients wearing multibracket orthodontic appliances and clear aligners. Materials and methods: An integrative literature search was performed through different databases, PubMed/Medline, PMC, and the Cochrane Library. This work was submitted to a search strategy following the PICO method and included the focus question: “Could the chosen orthodontic appliance change significantly the oral hygiene of the patient, impairing the periodontal health?” This work included analytical and controlled studies on humans published between 2005 and 2020, in the English language, establishing a comparison of the periodontal status in patients undergoing orthodontic multibracket and clear aligners therapies. The main periodontal indexes assessed were plaque index (PI), pocket depth (PD), gingival index (GI), and bleeding on probing (BoP). Results: The electronic research displayed 386 articles on PMC, 106 on PubMed, and 40 on the Cochrane Library. After removal, just 25 articles were selected for full-text screening, but just eight studies were eligible for this integrative review. It was enumerated that 204 patients were treated with aligners and 294 with multibracket orthodontic appliances, mainly elastomeric ligated brackets. Only the plaque index displayed a significant difference between the two groups and general data obtained showed a better control for periodontal health in the clear aligners. Limitations such as age, malocclusion severity, therapeutic choice, and different time measure was observed. In addition, the oral hygiene instruction and follow-up by a professional were different, and the role of malocclusion was not present in the studies. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, better results for periodontal health were found in the clear aligners. Therefore, more studies are necessary to affirm that aligners are synonymous with better gingival conditions in comparison with multibracket appliances. Other variables such as oral hygiene instructions, motivation, and supportive treatment tend to be more prevalent than the type of appliance itself in the periodontal evaluation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Oral Implants and Periodontal Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 789 KiB  
Review
Efficiency and Safety of Dental Implantation in the Area of Hyperdense Jaw Lesions: A Narrative Review
by Kimya Taghsimi, Andrey Vyacheslavovich Vasilyev, Valeriya Sergeevna Kuznetsova, Angelina Vladimirovna Galtsova, Varditer Agabekovna Badalyan and Igor Ivanovich Babichenko
Dent. J. 2022, 10(6), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10060107 - 10 Jun 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 14802
Abstract
Background. Mineralized lesions of the jaws are often found incidentally on radiographs and computed tomography. Most of them are benign, and only a few rare cases are associated with malignant transformation. However, there is little clinical data on successful rehabilitation with implants in [...] Read more.
Background. Mineralized lesions of the jaws are often found incidentally on radiographs and computed tomography. Most of them are benign, and only a few rare cases are associated with malignant transformation. However, there is little clinical data on successful rehabilitation with implants in patients with mineralized lesions. This narrative review aimed to study the efficiency and safety of dental implantation in the area of hyperdense lesions. Materials and Methods. A PubMed, Google Scholar, and Science Direct database search was carried out with keywords and manually. Results. The literature exploration identified 323 articles; only 19 of them matched the search criteria and reported cases about dental implantation in the lesion area. It has been shown that in 84.2% of described cases, dental implantation was successful: in the osteoid osteoma, odontoma, cementoblastoma, idiopathic osteosclerosis, and condensing osteitis areas dental implantation was performed without any complications. The possibility of lesion recurrence and implant failure limited the use of dental implants in the area of osteoblastoma and cemento-osseous dysplasia. Although most cases of dental implantation in hyperdense jaw lesions were successful and were not accompanied by complications, further research is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Oral Implants and Periodontal Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

13 pages, 686 KiB  
Systematic Review
Mechanical Factors Implicated in Zirconia Implant Fracture Placed within the Anterior Region—A Systematic Review
by Lauryn Attard, Victoria Lee, Jennifer Le, Chloe Lowe, Vipra Singh, Jacky Zhao and Dileep Sharma
Dent. J. 2022, 10(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj10020022 - 2 Feb 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3660
Abstract
Background: To analyze the fracture resistance of zirconia implants within the anterior region and evaluate whether zirconia–zirconia implants can be a viable alternative to titanium implants. Methods: Four online databases (Cochrane Library, Ovid, PubMed, and Scopus) were searched for the period of January [...] Read more.
Background: To analyze the fracture resistance of zirconia implants within the anterior region and evaluate whether zirconia–zirconia implants can be a viable alternative to titanium implants. Methods: Four online databases (Cochrane Library, Ovid, PubMed, and Scopus) were searched for the period of January 2011 to July 2021. All studies that analyzed the in vivo clinical outcome of two-piece implants in the anterior region in English language were included. Results: The search strategy identified 242 studies. Of these studies, three studies were included for qualitative synthesis based on the pre-determined eligibility criteria. The results showed that there is significant difference in biological results, fractal behavior and other complications between one-piece and two-piece zirconia implants. Two-piece zirconia implants demonstrated favorable longevity and success rates within anterior maxillary in short-term trials. Conclusions: Although factors involved in fractures have been identified—sandblasting, implant diameter, occlusal load, age and implant coating—there is limited quantitative assessment to gauge the fracture resistance of two-piece zirconia implants. Hence, further research with long-term clinical evidence is required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Oral Implants and Periodontal Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop