Dental Oncology

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 22 August 2024 | Viewed by 8972

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
College of Dentistry, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
Interests: dental oncology; oral medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dental oncology is an important part of oncology dedicated to meeting the unique dental and oral healthcare needs of oncology patients. The evolution of dental oncology as a subspecialty in oral medicine has undergone changes over the last few decades. With the daily advancement in the field of oncology, oral healthcare providers need to stay updated on therapies and possible oral complications and management.

This Special Issue, “Dental Oncology”, will publish high-quality papers on the advances and prospects in all fields of dental oncology. Original research, clinical trials and review articles are welcome for submission.

Dr. Adepitan A. Owosho
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dental oncology
  • head and neck cancer
  • oral squamous cell carcinoma
  • oral medicine
  • oral pathology
  • management and prognosis
  • osteoradionecrosis
  • medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw
  • xerostomia
  • trismus
  • stem cell transplant
  • bone marrow transplant

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 600 KiB  
Article
Prospective Cohort Study Identifies Medical Predictors of Treatment-Related Oral Toxicities in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients
by Leticia Rodrigues-Oliveira, César Rivera, Xaviera A. López-Cortés, Milena Perez Mak, Ana Leticia Mores, Cesar Augusto Migliorati, Maria Cecília Querido de Oliveira, Natalia Rangel Palmier, Luiz Alcino Gueiros, Pablo Agustin Vargas, Thaís Bianca Brandão, Alan Roger Santos-Silva and Ana Carolina Prado-Ribeiro
Dent. J. 2024, 12(4), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12040089 - 1 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1041
Abstract
The dental treatment of patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOPSCC) may be challenging for dentists. This study aimed to characterize systemic changes in patients with OOPSCC undergoing dental treatment prior to cancer therapy, with a specific focus on laboratory [...] Read more.
The dental treatment of patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOPSCC) may be challenging for dentists. This study aimed to characterize systemic changes in patients with OOPSCC undergoing dental treatment prior to cancer therapy, with a specific focus on laboratory assessments. The primary objectives included identifying potential adverse events, such as infections or bleeding, resulting from dental procedures. Additionally, the study aimed to correlate baseline patient characteristics with treatment-related toxicities. This was a prospective cohort study that included 110 OOPSCC patients referred to the Dental Oncology Service at São Paulo State Cancer Institute, Brazil, between November/2019 and December/2020. Comorbidities, sociodemographic data, medication in use, cancer treatment-related toxicities, and altered laboratory tests results were correlated. The most common comorbidities and altered laboratory results were hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, as well as elevated levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Toxicities exhibited a progressive pattern over time, encompassing oral mucositis (OM), xerostomia, dysphagia, dysgeusia, trismus, and radiodermatitis. No correlation between comorbidities and cancer treatment-related toxicities, a positive correlation between medications in use and OM, and a negative correlation between medications and dysgeusia were found. OM was associated with altered thyroxine (T4) and free thyroxine (FT4), calcium, urea, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, and syphilis. Family income and housing were OM predictors. Altered T4/FT4/urea/calcium/alkaline phosphatase/creatinine/syphilis may be useful clinical predictors of OM. Despite the elevated prevalence of comorbidities and abnormal laboratory findings, dental treatment prior to cancer treatment yielded no adverse events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Oncology)
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12 pages, 572 KiB  
Article
Screening for High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Reveals HPV52 and HPV58 among Pediatric and Adult Patient Saliva Samples
by Hunter Hinton, Lorena Herrera, Sofia Valenzuela, Katherine M. Howard and Karl Kingsley
Dent. J. 2024, 12(3), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12030056 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1246
Abstract
Previous research has demonstrated that the human papillomavirus (HPV) can infect a wide range of human tissues, including those within the oral cavity. High-risk oral HPV strains have been associated with the development and progression of oral cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinomas. [...] Read more.
Previous research has demonstrated that the human papillomavirus (HPV) can infect a wide range of human tissues, including those within the oral cavity. High-risk oral HPV strains have been associated with the development and progression of oral cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinomas. Although many studies have examined the prevalence of the high-risk strains HPV16 and HPV18, far fewer have assessed the prevalence of other high-risk HPV strains. An approved study protocol was used to identify HPV52 and HPV58 among clinical samples (n = 87) from a saliva biorepository. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and validated primers for HPV52 and HPV58 were used to facilitate this screening. This screening demonstrated that a total of n = 4/45 or 8.9% of adult saliva samples harbored high-risk HPV52, and n = 2/45 or 4.4% tested positive for high-risk HPV58. In addition, a total of n = 6/42 or 14.3% of the pediatric saliva samples tested positive for high-risk HPV, including n = 5/42 or 11.9% with HPV52 and n = 3/42 or 7.1% for HPV58. These data demonstrate the presence of the high-risk oncogenic HPV52 and HPV58 strains among both adult and pediatric clinical patient samples. More detailed longitudinal research must be conducted to determine whether this prevalence may be increasing or decreasing over time. In addition, these data strongly support public health prevention efforts, such as knowledge and awareness of the nine-valent HPV vaccine covering additional high-risk strains, including HPV52 and HPV58. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Oncology)
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Review

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14 pages, 504 KiB  
Review
Clinical and Psychosocial Impact of Communication about Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: A Scoping Review
by Lady P. A. Arboleda, Thaís C. E. Pereira, Joel B. Epstein, Cesar A. Migliorati, Saman Warnakulasuriya, Márcio Diniz-Freitas, Marcio A. Lopes and Alan R. Santos-Silva
Dent. J. 2023, 11(9), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11090209 - 4 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1310
Abstract
Delivering bad news has been widely studied in cancer, thus, this scoping review aims to identify the available evidence concerning the communication of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and their clinical and psychosocial impacts. A search was performed using electronic databases (Medline/PubMed, Scopus, [...] Read more.
Delivering bad news has been widely studied in cancer, thus, this scoping review aims to identify the available evidence concerning the communication of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and their clinical and psychosocial impacts. A search was performed using electronic databases (Medline/PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science) and one grey literature database (Google Scholar). Studies focused on communicating the diagnosis of OPMDs and the patients’ perceptions were included. Study selection and data extraction were performed by two authors in a two-phase process. Five publications were included in the qualitative analysis. Differences regarding the study design, population, OPMDs assessed, and outcomes of professional–patient communication were found in each study. Protocols for OPMD communication have not yet been reported and there is a need to standardize strategies as communication skills may provide better clinical outcomes for patients diagnosed with potentially malignant disorders. Although future studies are needed, a brief list recommending the aspects that must be communicated is proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Oncology)
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20 pages, 3578 KiB  
Review
The Role of Dental Practitioners in the Management of Oncology Patients: The Head and Neck Radiation Oncology Patient and the Medical Oncology Patient
by Adepitan A. Owosho, Katherine DeColibus, Beverly Hedgepeth, Burton C. Wood, Ritter E. Sansoni, John P. Gleysteen and David L. Schwartz
Dent. J. 2023, 11(5), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11050136 - 17 May 2023
Viewed by 2354
Abstract
This narrative review addresses the role of a dentist in the management of oncology patients, highlighting the oral complications that arise in head and neck radiation oncology patients and medical oncology patients. The prevention and management of these complications are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Oncology)
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Other

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25 pages, 891 KiB  
Systematic Review
Exploring the Risk Factors for Oral Cancer in Pakistan: A Systematic Literature Review
by Muhammad Feroz Khan, Richard P. Hayhoe and Russell Kabir
Dent. J. 2024, 12(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12020025 - 29 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1973
Abstract
Background: Oral cancer is one of the major public health issues in Pakistan and is the second most common malignancy in the country. This is mainly attributed to the widespread use of smokeless tobacco products, cigarettes, and paan without tobacco. This review aims [...] Read more.
Background: Oral cancer is one of the major public health issues in Pakistan and is the second most common malignancy in the country. This is mainly attributed to the widespread use of smokeless tobacco products, cigarettes, and paan without tobacco. This review aims to go beyond commonly discussed factors and, consequently, to provide a comprehensive picture of all the multi-faceted contributors to the high prevalence of the carcinoma of the oral cavity, including the role of human papillomavirus and genetic predisposition. The aim is to synthesise all available evidence on the predisposing factors of oral carcinoma in Pakistan. Methods: This is a comprehensive systematic review of all observational studies investigating the contributing factors of malignancy of the oral cavity in Pakistan, and it strictly follows the PRISMA guidelines. Multiple databases, such as PubMed, EBSCO CINAHL Plus, SCOPUS, and Ovid Medline, were used to find studies, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched for existing/ongoing reviews carried out on the same topic. A meta-synthesis of selected studies was carried out to create robust and statistically valid conclusions. Results: ST and cigarette smoking were found to be the major contributors to the burden of carcinoma of the lip and oral cavity. The included studies indicated that genetic predisposition and human papillomavirus could be major risk factors for the disease in the Pakistani population, but not enough research has been carried out to find their true impact. Conclusions: Smokeless tobacco, cigarette smoking, genetic predisposition, and human papillomavirus can be considered significant risk factors for oral cancer in Pakistan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Oncology)
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