Women's Research in Dentistry

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2024 | Viewed by 8347

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, 4200-393 Porto, Portugal
2. i3S, Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal
Interests: oral microbiology

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Guest Editor
Dental Clinic - Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Science and Public Health, University of Brescia, ASST-Spedali Civili, 25121 Brescia, Italy
Interests: paediatric dentistry; oral medicine; chemotherapy-related oral complications

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Guest Editor
Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Gundulićeva 5, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: orthodontics; dental materials; temporomandibular disorders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a new Special Issue for Dentistry Journal—“Women’s Research in Dentistry”—to celebrate and highlight the international achievements of female researchers in the field.

We invite researchers to submit their work on topics across all areas of dentistry. While we encourage contributions in which the lead/senior author is female, we welcome submissions from all authors, irrespective of their gender identity.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Benedita Sampaio-Maia
Dr. Elena Bardellini
Prof. Dr. Senka Meštrović
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 13173 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Nano- and Micro-Silica on the Setting Time and Microhardness of Conventional Glass–Ionomer Cements
by Zeynep A. Güçlü, Şaban Patat and Nichola J. Coleman
Dent. J. 2024, 12(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12030054 - 27 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1411
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the incorporation of 2, 4 or 6 wt% of amorphous nano- or micro-silica (Aerosil® OX 50 or Aeroperl® 300 Pharma (Evonik Operations GmbH, Essen, Germany), respectively) on the net setting [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the incorporation of 2, 4 or 6 wt% of amorphous nano- or micro-silica (Aerosil® OX 50 or Aeroperl® 300 Pharma (Evonik Operations GmbH, Essen, Germany), respectively) on the net setting time and microhardness of Ketac™ Molar (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) and Fuji IX GP® (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) glass–ionomer cements (GICs) (viz. KM and FIX, respectively). Both silica particles were found to cause a non-linear, dose-dependent reduction in setting time that was within the clinically acceptable limits specified in the relevant international standard (ISO 9917-1:2007). The microhardness of KM was statistically unaffected by blending with 2 or 4 wt% nano-silica at all times, whereas 6 wt% addition decreased and increased the surface hardness at 1 and 21 days, respectively. The incorporation of 4 or 6 wt% nano-silica significantly improved the microhardness of FIX at 1, 14 and 21 days, with no change in this property noted for 2 wt% addition. Micro-silica also tended to enhance the microhardness of FIX, at all concentrations and times, to an extent that became statistically significant for all dosages at 21 days. Conversely, 4 and 6 wt% additions of micro-silica markedly decreased the initial 1-day microhardness of KM, and the 21-day sample blended at 4 wt% was the only specimen that demonstrated a significant increase in this property. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the nano- and micro-silica particles were well distributed throughout the composite structures of both GICs with no evidence of aggregation or zoning. The specific mechanisms of the interaction of inorganic nanoparticles with the constituents of GICs require further understanding, and a lack of international standardization of the determination of microhardness is problematic in this respect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women's Research in Dentistry)
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10 pages, 898 KiB  
Article
Dental Maturation in Two Groups of Children Born in 1969–1973 and 2005–2010
by Astrid Rathcke Poulsen and Liselotte Sonnesen
Dent. J. 2023, 11(11), 248; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11110248 - 25 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1283
Abstract
This study compared differences in dental maturation and dental age in Scandinavian children born in 1969–1973 and 2005–2010. The study was based on 130 ethnic Scandinavian children, who were divided in two groups corresponding to the time periods and matched on age and [...] Read more.
This study compared differences in dental maturation and dental age in Scandinavian children born in 1969–1973 and 2005–2010. The study was based on 130 ethnic Scandinavian children, who were divided in two groups corresponding to the time periods and matched on age and sex. Each group consisted of 65 children (30 girls, 35 boys, mean age 9.29 years and 9.30 years, respectively). Dental maturation was analysed by orthopantomographs, in accordance with Demirjian and Haavikko. Dental age was analysed by orthopantomographs in accordance with Demirjian. Boys and girls were analysed separately by linear regression analysis adjusted for age. For the children born in 2005–2010, teeth matured significantly earlier (Demirjian: 0.21 maturities, CI 95% 0.11–0.31, p < 0.000. Haavikko: maxilla: 0.39 maturities, CI 95% 0.21–0.56, p < 0.000. Mandible: 0.42 maturities, CI 95% 0.17–0.67, p = 0.001) and the dental age was significantly higher (Demirjian: 6.04 months, CI 95% 0.23–0.77, p < 0.000) in comparison with the children born in 1969–1973. In conclusion, the teeth of Scandinavian children born 2005–2010 matured significantly earlier than those of children born in 1969–1973. The results may prove valuable in forensic dentistry, pedodontics, and for the timing of pedodontic and orthodontic treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women's Research in Dentistry)
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12 pages, 1908 KiB  
Article
Resistance of PETG Materials on Thermocycling and Brushing
by Luka Šimunović, Tadeja Blagec and Senka Meštrović
Dent. J. 2023, 11(5), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11050135 - 16 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1686
Abstract
The aim was to assess the impact of thermocycling and brushing on the surface roughness and mass of PETG material—the most commonly used for orthodontic retainers. A total of 96 specimens were exposed to thermocycling and brushing with three different kinds of toothbrushes [...] Read more.
The aim was to assess the impact of thermocycling and brushing on the surface roughness and mass of PETG material—the most commonly used for orthodontic retainers. A total of 96 specimens were exposed to thermocycling and brushing with three different kinds of toothbrushes depending on the number and thickness of the bristles. Surface roughness and mass were evaluated three times: initially, after thermocycling, and after brushing. In all four brands, both thermocycling and brushing increased surface roughness significantly (p < 0.001), with Biolon having the lowest and Track A having the highest. In terms of brushing, only Biolon samples showed statistically significant increased roughness after brushing with all three types of brushes, in comparison to Erkodur A1, where differences were not statistically significant. Thermocycling increased the mass of all samples, but a statistically significant difference was found only in Biolon (p = 0.0203), while after brushing, decreased mass was found in all specimens, statistically significant only in Essix C+ (CS 1560: p = 0.016). PETG material showed instability when exposed to external influences- thermocycling produced an increase in roughness and mass, and brushing mostly caused an increase in roughness and decrease in mass. Erkodur A1 demonstrated the greatest stability, whereas Biolon demonstrated the lowest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women's Research in Dentistry)
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11 pages, 1025 KiB  
Article
Five-Year Clinical Performance of Complex Class II Resin Composite and Amalgam Restorations—A Retrospective Study
by Maria Jacinta M. C. Santos, Heleine Maria C. Rêgo, Imad Siddique and Abbas Jessani
Dent. J. 2023, 11(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11040088 - 24 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3119
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the clinical performance of posterior complex resin composite (RC) and amalgam (AM) restorations after a five-year period. One hundred and nineteen complex Class II restorations placed by dental students were evaluated using the USPHS [...] Read more.
The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the clinical performance of posterior complex resin composite (RC) and amalgam (AM) restorations after a five-year period. One hundred and nineteen complex Class II restorations placed by dental students were evaluated using the USPHS criteria. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Mann–Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests at a 0.05 level of significance. After five years, the percentages of clinically satisfactory complex Class II RC and AM restorations were 78% and 76.8%, respectively. The main reasons for the failure of AM restorations included secondary caries (Bravo—10.1%), defective marginal adaptation (Charlie—8.7%), and fracture of the tooth (Bravo—7.2%). RC restorations presented failures related to the fracture of the restoration (Bravo—16%) and defective marginal adaptation (Charlie—8.2%). There was a significantly higher incidence of secondary caries for AM restorations (AM—10.1%; RC—0%; p = 0.0415) and a higher number of fractures for RC restorations (AM—4.3%; RC—16%; p = 0.05). Regarding anatomy, AM restorations presented a significantly higher number of Alfa scores (49.3%) compared to RC restorations (22.4%) (p = 0.0005). The results of the current study indicate that complex class II RC and AM restorations show a similar five year clinical performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women's Research in Dentistry)
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