Delivering Sustainable Dairy Products with Added Value

A special issue of Dairy (ISSN 2624-862X). This special issue belongs to the section "Milk Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2023) | Viewed by 11487

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Dairy Research, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens, Greece
Interests: food science and technology; food processing; food preservation; functional food; dairy science; dairy technology; dairy microbiology; dairy chemistry; milk quality; milk authedication; milk clotting enzymes; lipase
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Dairy Research, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens, Greece
Interests: cheese science and technology; analytical methods; effect of processing on the composition and the biochemical characteristics of milk and dairy products; indices of heat treatment; properties of yoghurt; differentiation of milk from different species; casein genotypes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interest of both researchers and consumers in the production of dairy products with improved nutritional value and biofunctional properties is constantly increasing. On the other hand, because of the environmental problems that can be caused the by-products of the dairy industry, whey, acid-whey, and buttermilk are exploited to deliver their compounds within the framework of sustainability. Hence, new ingredients and emerging technologies can be applied to formulate novel dairy products targeted to environment and circular economy.

This Special Issue aims to collect articles that concern the application of processing technologies with low energy consumption, such as alternative methods for heat treatment, non-thermal treatments, or the use of dairy by-products or other ingredients (e.g., encapsulated bioactive compounds of dairy or non-dairy origin, probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics) to improve the biofunctional properties of new dairy products. Moreover, articles about alternative packaging (e.g., edible coatings) can be included. Finally, articles on modern methods for the analysis of dairy products are also welcome.

Dr. Ekaterini Moschopoulou
Prof. Dr. Golfo Moatsou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dairy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fermented milk products
  • cheese
  • whey
  • ice cream
  • buttermilk
  • probiotics
  • encapsulation
  • edible coatings
  • non-thermal processing
  • membrane technology

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 1935 KiB  
Article
Cheese and Yogurt By-Products as Valuable Ingredients for the Production of Prebiotic Oligosaccharides
by Athanasios Limnaios, Maria Tsevdou, Eirini Zafeiri, Evangelos Topakas and Petros Taoukis
Dairy 2024, 5(1), 78-92; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy5010007 - 12 Jan 2024
Viewed by 842
Abstract
The growing global market of dairy products has led to the need for alternative approaches regarding whey valorization, which is the primary by-product of cheese and strained yogurt production. In this context, prebiotic galactooligosaccharides can be produced enzymatically from whey using commercially available [...] Read more.
The growing global market of dairy products has led to the need for alternative approaches regarding whey valorization, which is the primary by-product of cheese and strained yogurt production. In this context, prebiotic galactooligosaccharides can be produced enzymatically from whey using commercially available β-galactosidases. A comparative study was conducted to assess the production of galactooligosaccharides from sweet and acid whey, thereby employing two commercial β-galactosidases from Aspergillus oryzae and Kluyveromyces lactis. The study considered the initial lactose content and enzyme load as variables. The maximum yields of galactooligosaccharides in concentrated sweet whey (15% w/v initial lactose) and raw acid whey (3.1% w/v initial lactose) reached 34.4 and 14.7% with lactase from Kluyveromyces lactis (0.13 U/mL), respectively. The corresponding galactooligosaccharide yields for lactase from Aspergillus oryzae were equal to 27.4 and 24.8% in the most concentrated sweet and acid whey, respectively, using enzyme loads of 2 U/mL in sweet whey and 1 U/mL in acid whey. Concerning the profile of the produced galactooligosaccharides, the Kluyveromyces lactis lactase hydrolyzed lactose more rapidly and resulted in higher levels of allolactose and lower levels of 6-galactosyl-lactose, compared to the lactase from Aspergillus oryzae, and achieved in both cases a polymerization degree of up to six. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delivering Sustainable Dairy Products with Added Value)
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25 pages, 401 KiB  
Article
Descriptive Characteristics and Cheesemaking Technology of Greek Cheeses Not Listed in the EU Geographical Indications Registers
by Eleni C. Pappa and Efthymia Kondyli
Dairy 2023, 4(1), 43-67; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy4010003 - 03 Jan 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2160
Abstract
Greece has a variety of cheeses that are registered as protected designation of origin and protected geographical indications, and many others that are produced in a traditional way, without such registration. This article aims to describe the characteristics of these cheeses, which do [...] Read more.
Greece has a variety of cheeses that are registered as protected designation of origin and protected geographical indications, and many others that are produced in a traditional way, without such registration. This article aims to describe the characteristics of these cheeses, which do not bear a certification of geographical indication, in order to increase their significance. Therefore, in this work, the scientific data published about the history, production, composition, and other specific properties of some milk cheeses (Kariki, hard Xinotyri, soft Xinotyri, Kefalotyri, Kashkaval Pindos, Graviera, Manoura Sifnos, Teleme, Tsalafouti, Tyraki Tinou, Ladotyri Zakynthou, Touloumotyri, and Melichloro) and whey cheeses (Anthotyros, Myzithra, and Urda) are presented. This information may contribute to their better promotion and recognition, protecting their heritage, and supporting the local economy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delivering Sustainable Dairy Products with Added Value)
14 pages, 294 KiB  
Article
Economic Feasibility, Benefits and Challenges of On-Farm Artisanal Cheese Making in South Africa
by Faith Nyamakwere, Giulia Esposito, Ozias Mombo and Emiliano Raffrenato
Dairy 2022, 3(4), 747-760; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy3040051 - 27 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2872
Abstract
There is limited information regarding artisanal cheese making that can help entrepreneurs evaluate business opportunities and make realistic business decisions. The objective of this study was to assess the economic feasibility, benefits and challenges of on-farm artisanal cheese making. A model was designed [...] Read more.
There is limited information regarding artisanal cheese making that can help entrepreneurs evaluate business opportunities and make realistic business decisions. The objective of this study was to assess the economic feasibility, benefits and challenges of on-farm artisanal cheese making. A model was designed to evaluate the economic feasibility of processing hard pecorino-style cheese and soft fresh ricotta on four different smallholder farms. The study assumed a small-scale family-owned business with an average herd size of 10 lactating cows, using 80 L of raw milk a day to make cheese. Projected Cash Flow Statement was used to determine the economic feasibility of cheese making. Sensitivity analysis was conducted using a factor of 10% to determine the changes in net cash flows by varying the milk volume, cheese selling price and both. The positive projected cash flow after the sensitivity analysis for the four farms ranged from $24,073.84 to $33,783.5. The breakeven quantity for the four farms ranged from 325.82 kg to 357.88 kg per year.Overall, the results show that artisanal cheese making is economically viable under the given model assumptions. However, the major challenge noted is that most farmers lack knowledge in terms of the processing techniques, market opportunities and production costs involved in cheese making. Access to this information by small-scale milk producers is vital in considering cheese making as a business. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delivering Sustainable Dairy Products with Added Value)

Review

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22 pages, 421 KiB  
Review
Sustainable Approaches in Whey Cheese Production: A Review
by Thomas Bintsis and Photis Papademas
Dairy 2023, 4(2), 249-270; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy4020018 - 28 Mar 2023
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4746
Abstract
Whey cheeses have been produced from the very early steps of cheesemaking practices as a sustainable way to utilize whey, which is the main by-product of cheesemaking. Traditional whey cheeses, manufactured with similar processes, are Ricotta, Ricotta salata or Ricottone, and Ricotta fresca [...] Read more.
Whey cheeses have been produced from the very early steps of cheesemaking practices as a sustainable way to utilize whey, which is the main by-product of cheesemaking. Traditional whey cheeses, manufactured with similar processes, are Ricotta, Ricotta salata or Ricottone, and Ricotta fresca in Italy; Anthotyros, Myzithra, Manouri, Xynomyzithra, and Urda in Greece; Urda in Serbia and Romania as well as in other countries such as Israel; Lor in Turkey; Anari in Cyprus; Skuta in Croatia and Serbia; Gjetost and Brunost in Norway; Mesost and Messmör in Sweden; Mysuostur in Iceland; Myseost in Denmark; Requeijão in Portugal; and Requesón in Spain and Mexico. The production of whey cheese is based on the denaturation of whey proteins by heating to 88–92 °C. The specific processing conditions and aspects of the microbiology of whey cheeses are discussed. The special characteristics of whey cheeses, which are high pH and high moisture content, make them susceptible to microbial growth. Due to the limited shelf life of these products, extended research has been carried out to extend the shelf life of whey cheese. The sustainable preservation approaches, such as modified atmosphere packaging, addition of herbs and/or plant extracts, and bio-preservation methods are reviewed. Moreover, novel whey cheeses focused on functional properties have developed during the last 10 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delivering Sustainable Dairy Products with Added Value)
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