Recently Research on Eutectic Alloy Materials

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 3483

Special Issue Editors

School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072, China
Interests: metallurgy and material preparation under strong magnetic field; rapid solidification; melt structure transition; eutectic alloys

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steels, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China
Interests: high magnetic field; alloy solidification; electromagnetic processing of materials; X-ray tomography

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Mechatronic Engineering and Automation, Foshan University, Foshan 528011, China
Interests: solidification process; synchrotron radiation X-ray imaging

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072, China
Interests: eutectic alloys; multi-principal element alloys; non-equilibrium rapid solidification
State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China
Interests: non-equilibrium rapid solidification; liquid–liquid structural transition; multi-principal element alloys

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Eutectic alloys have always been an important structural material in engineering due to their unique self-composite microstructures and excellent casting performances. The mechanical properties of the material depend on its solidification microstructure characteristics; consequently, the solidification behavior study of microstructure evolution and anomalous eutectic and eutectic colony structure formations in undercooled binary eutectic melts have attracted considerable interest for some decades. An undercooled rapid solidification study also plays an important role in clarifying grain refinement mechanisms and developing a solidification theoretical model of eutectic alloys. Conventional eutectic alloys are composed of one or two main elements, and their performances are mainly improved by adding a small amount of other elements. In recent years, eutectic high-entropy alloys composed of multiple main elements have rapidly become a new research hotspot. The development of eutectic high-entropy alloys is without the restriction of single-phase alloys and binary eutectic alloys, which cannot have a high strength and high plasticity at the same time, providing broad development ideas for the design of new structural material systems. Since then, a series of eutectic high-entropy alloys with a high strength, high plasticity and high thermal stability have been designed and developed under the action of many unique effects, such as the sluggish diffusion of high-entropy alloys. Studies have shown that eutectic alloys with micro-sized grains exhibit a superplastic strain; therefore, eutectic refinement methods and mechanisms are always an important field worthy of further study. With the development of laser-additive manufacturing and other preparation technologies, it also provides a new way to prepare refined nano-eutectic and develop new complex eutectic alloys. It should be noted that there are still significant challenges to clarify the physical metallurgy mechanism of multi-principal element alloys and develop complex eutectic alloys on demand. Therefore, the design and preparation of controllable high-strength and good-plasticity eutectic alloys will remain the focus of future research on structural materials.

Dr. Yixuan He
Dr. Tianxiang Zheng
Dr. Zongye Ding
Dr. Jianbao Zhang
Dr. Fan Bu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eutectic alloys
  • rapid solidification
  • anomalous eutectic alloys
  • dendrite eutectic alloys
  • nano-eutectic alloys
  • eutectic high-entropy alloys

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

19 pages, 25062 KiB  
Article
Phase-Field Simulation of the Microstructure Evolution in the Eutectic Alloy NiAl-31Cr-3Mo
by Michael Kellner, Camelia Schulz, Alexander Kauffmann, Martin Heilmaier and Britta Nestler
Crystals 2023, 13(7), 1046; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13071046 - 01 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1017
Abstract
The directionally solidified eutectic alloy NiAl-(Cr,Mo) is a promising candidate for structural applications at high temperatures, due to its increased creep resistance compared to its single phase B2ordered NiAl counterpart. This system yields an eutectic trough connecting the invariant reactions of the [...] Read more.
The directionally solidified eutectic alloy NiAl-(Cr,Mo) is a promising candidate for structural applications at high temperatures, due to its increased creep resistance compared to its single phase B2ordered NiAl counterpart. This system yields an eutectic trough connecting the invariant reactions of the ternary alloys NiAl-Cr and NiAl-Mo. During directional solidification (DS) along this trough the evolved microstructures of the two-phase eutectic is changing from fibrous to lamellar and back to fibrous morphology while increasing and decreasing the amounts of Mo and Cr, respectively. To investigate these effects in the morphology, the phase-field method has proven to be predestined in the last decades. However, as the modeling of quaternary systems is challenging for the simulation with a grand potential based phase-field model, the focus of this work is on the generation of a material model for one defined compound namely NiAl-31Cr-3Mo. The modeling is validated by investigating the microstructure evolution in two- and three-dimensional simulations of the DS process for two different growth velocities and by investigating their undercooling spacing relationships. The evolving microstructures obtained from three-dimensional large-scale simulations are presented and validated with corresponding micrographs from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of directionally solidified samples with the same growth velocities. The simulation results show the theoretically expected behaviors and are in qualitative and quantitative accordance with DS experiments. The study of NiAl-31Cr-3Mo serves as the basis for a comprehensive data-driven analysis of microstructure properties and system quantities of the entire quaternary material NiAl-(Cr,Mo). With this, an accelerated design of advanced materials is promoted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recently Research on Eutectic Alloy Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

17 pages, 2364 KiB  
Review
Corrosion of Eutectic High-Entropy Alloys: A Review
by Kaiyang Li, Yunlong Zhai, Minjie Lai, Min Song, Shanfang Zou, Guojie Huang, Khurram Yaqoob, Zhangwei Wang and Naiqiang Zhang
Crystals 2023, 13(8), 1231; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13081231 - 09 Aug 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1492
Abstract
High-entropy alloys (HEAs) are emerging as a new family of alloys with equal/near-equal amounts of constituting elements and outstanding properties. In particular, eutectic high-entropy alloys (EHEAs) with alternate lamella phases possess both high strength and ductility, offering the advantage of conquering the strength–ductility [...] Read more.
High-entropy alloys (HEAs) are emerging as a new family of alloys with equal/near-equal amounts of constituting elements and outstanding properties. In particular, eutectic high-entropy alloys (EHEAs) with alternate lamella phases possess both high strength and ductility, offering the advantage of conquering the strength–ductility trade-off that could hardly be achieved by conventional alloys. While the mechanical behavior of EHEAs has been widely studied, the corrosion behavior is still not fully understood. Furthermore, the environment-induced degradation could largely decide the service life of EHEA as engineering alloys, and the eutectic structure may have a special influence on the corrosion process. This article systematically reviews the corrosion studies of EHEAs by pointing out the structural features of EHEAs, summarizing the general corrosion issues for EHEAs and identifying the specific corrosion performance of different EHEA systems. It is found that EHEAs feature micro-galvanic corrosion due to their eutectic crystal structure, and such a corrosion mode is further affected by testing time, heat treatment, temperature, and applied potential. All the corrosion-affecting factors are summarized, and future research directions are suggested, aiming at ensuring the wide engineering application of EHEAs with both high strength–ductility and corrosion resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recently Research on Eutectic Alloy Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop