Special Issue "Advances in Composite Electrodes Materials"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials for Energy Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 3857

Special Issue Editors

Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
Interests: novel composite electrode materials; supercapacitor composite electrodes; composite battery electrodes; nanocomposite electrodes; characterization of composite electrodes; composite energy material electrodes; composite ceramic electrodes
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
Interests: supercapacitor composite electrodes; composite battery electrodes; composite materials for solar cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in composite electrode materials are greatly needed for high technology in renewable energy harvesting and high-power density storage systems. Due to their tremendous technological potential for producing innovative materials with custom properties and performance profiles much beyond those of the existing ones, advanced composite electrode materials are of considerable interest in both basic science and practical research. Our primary focus is on the creation of composite materials in the form of thin films or nanoparticles for use in a variety of energy storage or harvesting, catalysis, and water purification technologies. Composites created in this way could be created using a variety of physical and chemical techniques, with their morphology, size, shape, crystallinity, flaws, surface area, and homogeneous stoichiometry all potentially modified and tuned using growth mechanisms. The development of materials for composite electrodes, including their synthesis, characterization, and applications, is covered in this Special Issue of Crystals, entitled "Advances in Composite Electrodes Materials", along with the most recent developments in the creation of composite electrode materials with process-dependent properties. This Special Issue was created to discuss cutting-edge synthesis and characterization methods and potential applications in light of numerous recent discoveries and advancements in emerging and composite electrode materials, which are anticipated to motivate and arm researchers from the academic and industrial worlds with fresh ideas for advancements in composite electrode materials.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Composite energy material electrodes;
  • Nanoparticle composites;
  • Nanomaterial composite electrodes;
  • Composite thin-film electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells.

Prof. Dr. Fabian I. Ezema
Dr. Chinwe Nwanya
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • novel composite electrodes
  • supercapacitor composite electrodes
  • composite battery electrodes
  • nanocomposite electrodes
  • characterization of composite electrodes
  • composite energy material electrodes
  • composite ceramic electrodes
  • properties of composite electrodes
  • modeling of composite electrodes
  • carbon composite electrodes

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 5649 KiB  
Article
Crystal Structure, Ionic Conductivity, Dielectric Properties and Electrical Conduction Mechanism of the Wyllieites Na1.5Mn3.5(AsO4)3 and Na1.5Mn3Fe0.5(AsO4)3
Crystals 2023, 13(8), 1251; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13081251 - 14 Aug 2023
Viewed by 516
Abstract
Na1.5MnII3MnIII0.5(AsO4)3 and Na1.5MnII3FeIII0.5(AsO4)3 compounds were synthesized via a high-temperature solid-state combustion reaction. The obtained samples were submitted to structural, morphological, and [...] Read more.
Na1.5MnII3MnIII0.5(AsO4)3 and Na1.5MnII3FeIII0.5(AsO4)3 compounds were synthesized via a high-temperature solid-state combustion reaction. The obtained samples were submitted to structural, morphological, and electrical characterizations. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that both compounds crystallize in the monoclinic system with the space group P21/c. The lattice parameters were determined to be a = 6.78344 Å, b = 12.93830 Å, c = 11.22825 Å, and β = 98.5374° for Na1.5MnII3MnIII0.5(AsO4)3, and a = 6.76723 Å, b = 12.9864 Å, c = 11.256 Å, and β = 98.8636° for Na1.5Mn2+3Fe3+0.5(AsO4)3. The structures consist of octahedral MnII and MnIII or FeIII ions connected by sharing edges, forming infinite chains. These chains are further connected by AsO4 tetrahedra, resulting in a three-dimensional anionic framework with tunnels parallel to the a-direction and cavities according to the c-direction. The structural models were validated using bond valence and charge distribution analyses. In addition to the structural characterization, the electric results depended on the crystal structures, indicating the potential of the studied materials for being used in several applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Electrodes Materials)
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12 pages, 3726 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Performance of Highly Stable Cathode Material Ag2V4O11 for Aqueous Zinc-Ion Battery
Crystals 2023, 13(4), 565; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13040565 - 27 Mar 2023
Viewed by 997
Abstract
One of the hottest research topics at present is the construction of environmentally friendly and secure aqueous zinc-ion batteries (AZIBs) using an aqueous electrolyte instead of an organic electrolyte. As a result of their diverse structure, valence state, high theoretical specific capacity, and [...] Read more.
One of the hottest research topics at present is the construction of environmentally friendly and secure aqueous zinc-ion batteries (AZIBs) using an aqueous electrolyte instead of an organic electrolyte. As a result of their diverse structure, valence state, high theoretical specific capacity, and other benefits, vanadium-based materials, which are frequently employed as the cathode of AZIBs, have drawn the attention of many researchers. The low cycle stability of zinc ion batteries (ZIBs) is mostly caused by the disintegration of the vanadium-based cathode materials during continuous charge and discharge. In this work, using 3M Zn(CF3SO3)2 as the electrolyte and hydrothermally synthesized Ag2V4O11 as the cathode material, the high-rate performance and extended cycle life of ZIBs were evaluated. The effects of different hydrothermal temperatures on the microstructure, capacity, and cycle stability of the Ag2V4O11 cathode material were examined. The experimental results show that Ag2V4O11 exhibits a typical intercalation-displacement process when used as the cathode material. The multiplicative performance and cycle stability of the cathode material were significantly enhanced at a hydrothermal temperature of 180 °C. Ag2V4O11-180 has a high discharge specific capacity of 251.5 mAh·g−1 at a current density of 0.5 A·g−1 and a long cycle life (117.6 mAh·g−1 after 1000 cycles at a current density of 3 A·g−1). According to the electrochemical kinetic investigation, the cathode material has a high pseudocapacitive charge storage and Zn2+ diffusion coefficient. This is attributed to the large layer spacing and the Ag+ anchored interlayer structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Electrodes Materials)
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11 pages, 4899 KiB  
Article
Synergistic Effect of the KBrO3 Electron Acceptor on the Photocatalytic Performance of the Nb-TiO2 Nanocomposite for Polluted Phenol Red Wastewater Treatment
Crystals 2022, 12(12), 1758; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst12121758 - 04 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 877
Abstract
In this work, the effect of KBrO3 on the photodegradation mechanism of Nb-TiO2 nanocomposites was analyzed. The photocatalytic activities of Nb-TiO2 were evaluated by using a high concentration of phenol red (PR). Nb-TiO2 nanocomposites were fabricated by a simple sol–gel [...] Read more.
In this work, the effect of KBrO3 on the photodegradation mechanism of Nb-TiO2 nanocomposites was analyzed. The photocatalytic activities of Nb-TiO2 were evaluated by using a high concentration of phenol red (PR). Nb-TiO2 nanocomposites were fabricated by a simple sol–gel route with new experimental conditions. HRTEM and EDX were used to study the structural properties of the Nb-TiO2 nanocomposites. KBrO3 decreased the degradation time of 20 mg·L−1 of phenol red to 110 min, shorter than that in our previous work without KBrO3. In addition, the results showed that the addition of KBrO3 led to a significant degradation process, which reached an efficiency of 95%. The fast decomposition of the PR pollutants was due to the charge transfer between the KBrO3 and Nb-TiO2 nanocomposites in the wastewater treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Electrodes Materials)
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15 pages, 4391 KiB  
Article
Investigation of Chemical Bath Deposited Transition Metals/GO Nanocomposites for Supercapacitive Electrodes
Crystals 2022, 12(11), 1613; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst12111613 - 11 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1061
Abstract
In this work, the chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique was utilized in the synthesis of transition metals/GO nanocomposites (Co3O4/MnO2/NiO/GO) for applications in supercapacitor electrodes. The nanocomposites after characterization showed that the electrically conductive nature and wide surface [...] Read more.
In this work, the chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique was utilized in the synthesis of transition metals/GO nanocomposites (Co3O4/MnO2/NiO/GO) for applications in supercapacitor electrodes. The nanocomposites after characterization showed that the electrically conductive nature and wide surface area of graphene oxide (GO) accounted for its incorporation into the nanocomposites. The synergy between the nanocomposites accounts for their improved performance and stable phase. The XRD results revealed cubic, orthorhombic, cubic, and mixed phases for the Co3O4/GO (CG), MnO2/GO (MG), NiO/GO (NG), and Co3O4/MnO2/NiO/GO (CMNG), respectively; their morphologies showed platelet nanoparticles with few agglomerates, with an average particle size of 69 ± 12 nm, 37 ± 09 nm, 58 ± 36 nm, and 36 ± 08 nm, respectively. For the produced materials, electrochemical results revealed maximum specific capacitance values of 2482 F/g from cyclic voltammograms and 1280.48 F/g from the galvanometric test. The results showed that the composites outperform single transition metal oxide (TMO) electrodes, with graphene oxide boosting the electrode performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Electrodes Materials)
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