Epitaxial Growth and Application of Metallic Oxide Thin Films

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 1522

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Stewart Blusson Quantum Matter Institute, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Interests: superconducting materials; epitaxial film growth; X-ray spectroscopy; thin films

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Guest Editor
Canadian Light Source (CLS) ,University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
Interests: solid state spectroscopy; thin film deposition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oxides are abundantly found in nature, encompassing insulators, semiconductors, as well as (good and bad) metals. Of these, metallic films are of particular interest. Metallic thin films as electrical conducting layers or contacts are essential components in electronic and spintronic devices. Itinerant electrons in quantum materials interact strongly with lattice, spin, and charge degree of freedom, leading to interesting electrical and magnetic properties and useful functionalities. Epitaxial growth that can control film stoichiometry and thickness, strain, as well as defects serves as a versatile experimental method for engineering material properties. Further, integrating different materials by epitaxial growth could create new physical properties at the boundary of two materials, i.e., at the interface. For instance, superconductivity, ferromagnetism, and high-mobility electron gases have been discovered recently at two-dimensional oxide interfaces.

This Special Issue aims to present a collection of articles describing recent advances in the epitaxial growth of oxide films using various epitaxy techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), pulsed laser deposition (PLD), atomic layer deposition (ALD), and sputtering deposition, and will also provide new results and insights into the physical properties and their application. The topics, with more emphasis on film synthesis and application, cover the theoretical design of novel materials, synthesis and characterization of oxide films, and device development based on metallic thin films.

Dr. Fengmiao Li
Dr. Ronny Sutarto
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • metallic oxide films
  • epitaxial growth
  • oxide interfaces
  • molecular beam epitaxy
  • pulsed laser deposition
  • atomic layer deposition
  • sputtering deposition

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 4830 KiB  
Article
Study of AlN Epitaxial Growth on Si (111) Substrate Using Pulsed Metal–Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition
by Muhammad Iznul Hisyam, Ahmad Shuhaimi, Rizuan Norhaniza, Marwan Mansor, Adam Williams and Mohd Rofei Mat Hussin
Crystals 2024, 14(4), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst14040371 - 16 Apr 2024
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Abstract
A dense and smooth aluminium nitride thin film grown on a silicon (111) substrates using pulsed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition is presented. The influence of the pulsed cycle numbers on the surface morphology and crystalline quality of the aluminium nitride films are discussed [...] Read more.
A dense and smooth aluminium nitride thin film grown on a silicon (111) substrates using pulsed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition is presented. The influence of the pulsed cycle numbers on the surface morphology and crystalline quality of the aluminium nitride films are discussed in detail. It was found that 70 cycle numbers produced the most optimized aluminium nitride films. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images show a dense and smooth morphology with a root-mean-square-roughness of 2.13 nm. The narrowest FWHM of the X-ray rocking curve for the AlN 0002 and 10–12 reflections are 2756 arcsec and 3450 arcsec, respectively. Furthermore, reciprocal space mapping reveals an in-plane tensile strain of 0.28%, which was induced by the heteroepitaxial growth on the silicon (111) substrate. This work provides an alternative approach to grow aluminium nitride for possible application in optoelectronic and power devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epitaxial Growth and Application of Metallic Oxide Thin Films)
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10 pages, 4921 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Sputtering Target Density on the Crystal and Electronic Structure of Epitaxial BaTiO3 Thin Films
by Fugang Qi, Shaoqin Peng, Jiachang Bi, Shunda Zhang, Guanhua Su, Peiyi Li, Jiahui Zhang, Tengteng Zhang, Weisong Zhou, Ruyi Zhang and Yanwei Cao
Crystals 2024, 14(4), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst14040304 - 26 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Barium titanate (BaTiO3) is a promising material for silicon-integrated photonics due to its large electro-optical coefficients, low loss, high refractive index, and fast response speed. Several deposition methods have been employed to synthesize BaTiO3 films. Magnetron sputtering is one of [...] Read more.
Barium titanate (BaTiO3) is a promising material for silicon-integrated photonics due to its large electro-optical coefficients, low loss, high refractive index, and fast response speed. Several deposition methods have been employed to synthesize BaTiO3 films. Magnetron sputtering is one of these methods, which offers specific advantages for growing large-scale films. However, there is a scarcity of studies investigating the effect of sputtering target density on the quality of BaTiO3 films. Therefore, this study aims to uncover the effect of sputtering targets on the crystal and electronic structures of epitaxial BaTiO3 thin films. Two BaTiO3 ceramic targets were sintered at different densities by altering the sintering temperatures. The crystal structure and chemical composition of the targets were then characterized using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Subsequently, BaTiO3 epitaxial films were grown by magnetron sputtering using these two targets. The crystal and electronic structures of the BaTiO3 films were analyzed using high-resolution X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Notably, the BaTiO3 films grown with high-density targets show superior quality but contain oxygen vacancies, whereas those films synthesized with low-density targets display high surface roughness. These findings provide insights into the effect of sputtering target density on the crystal and electronic structures of epitaxial BaTiO3 thin films. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epitaxial Growth and Application of Metallic Oxide Thin Films)
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