Special Issue "Consumer Behavior, Skin Type, and Usage of Cosmetic Products: Determinants and Implications for Cosmetic Counseling"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 41109

Special Issue Editors

UCIBIO/REQUIMTE, MedTech-Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Drug Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira nº 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
Interests: antioxidants; natural products; sunscreens and anti-aging cosmetics; phototoxicity; photostability and photoprotection; mechanical and sensory characterization of topical formulations; patient centric design of topical products; health literacy in cosmetology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. CNC - Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Center for Innovative Biomedicine and Biotechnology (CIBB), University of Coimbra, 3004-531 Coimbra, Portugal
2. CICS-UBI Health Sciences Research Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Beira Interior, 6201-001 Covilhã, Portugal
Interests: product development; vaginal and dermal delivery systems; in vitro models for product characterization; natural ingredients; consumer preferences
UCIBIO, REQUIMTE, Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Centre of Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: pharmaceutical technology; biopharmacy; pharmacokinetics; pharmaceutical nanotechnology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Progress in the cosmetic industry has increased the consumption of cosmetic products. With more cosmetics on the market today than ever before, it becomes obvious that they play a critical role in everyday life. However, reliable data regarding the usage patterns of cosmetic products are not readily available. Moreover, skin and hair care routines vary widely among consumers, and understanding the determinants of consumer behavior is still a challenge. While trends towards natural and sustainable products are ongoing, new tendencies will arise in a rapidly changing society. Additionally, the diagnosis of skin type is evolving while new technologies are developed and new insights into skin physiology are disclosed. Cosmetic counseling in pharmacies/healthcare settings is becoming more sophisticated and knowledgeable. Effective cosmetic counseling is supported by an objective evaluation of skin type and an understanding of consumer lifestyle and preferences. Therefore, it is essential to document the scientific evidence behind counseling.

This Special Issue will cover different aspects of the usage of cosmetic products across countries and times, and the behavior of consumers towards cosmetic products alongside examples of methodologies and systems for skin type evaluation. Discussion on implications for cosmetic counseling is also welcome.

Dr. Isabel Martins de Almeida
Dr. Rita Palmeira-de-Oliveira
Prof. Dr. José Manuel Sousa Lobo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (9 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

15 pages, 3492 KiB  
Article
Use of Cosmetic Creams and Perception of Natural and Eco-Friendly Products by Women: The Role of Sociodemographic Factors
Cosmetics 2023, 10(3), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics10030078 - 12 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1849
Abstract
The present work seeks to understand the use of cosmetic creams and the perception of natural and eco-friendly products by women and to explore the impacts of their personal characteristics. The study was designed using two approaches: (i) an investigation into the role [...] Read more.
The present work seeks to understand the use of cosmetic creams and the perception of natural and eco-friendly products by women and to explore the impacts of their personal characteristics. The study was designed using two approaches: (i) an investigation into the role of personal characteristics on the frequency of use and amount spent on cosmetic creams; and (ii) an understanding of the perception of natural and eco-friendly cosmetic creams by the use of check-all-that-apply (CATA) questions. Results showed that scholarity has a strong influence on the use of cosmetic creams; women with a postgraduate education reported higher frequency of use and spending on cosmetic creams and showed an awareness of natural and eco-friendly cosmetics. The subject of natural and eco-friendly cosmetic creams is not something that most of the women that participated were aware of, and the CATA technique proved to be a valuable tool to discover this. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 768 KiB  
Article
User Experience in Cosmetics: Perception Analysis Regarding the Use of an Anti-Aging Moisturizer
Cosmetics 2023, 10(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics10010033 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2331
Abstract
One of the most important characteristics of aging skin is dehydration, which is why the use of moisturizing products is very important, especially with increasing age. Thus, the user’s experience when using a product is interesting for the companies to develop specific cosmetics [...] Read more.
One of the most important characteristics of aging skin is dehydration, which is why the use of moisturizing products is very important, especially with increasing age. Thus, the user’s experience when using a product is interesting for the companies to develop specific cosmetics not only considering the physiological needs of each skin, but also according to the preference of a group if there is any. For this, a moisturizer was developed, containing an antioxidant active, ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate, whose sensory characteristics were evaluated by 33 Brazilian women between 30 and 60 years old. The results showed that the formulation was well accepted by all subjects, regardless of their age group, initial hydration, or the presence of visible signs of skin aging. It is suggested that the presence of the active ingredient in different concentrations caused a different perception of the formula for specific attributes such as the aqueous residue, film formation, and the feelings of oiliness and stickiness to the skin after application. These results suggest that the perception of the sensory characteristics of the product was more related to the nature and proportion of the compounds than to the age of the subjects. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 1873 KiB  
Article
Development and Validation of an Instrument to Appraise the Tolerability, Safety of Use, and Pleasantness of a Cosmetic Product
Cosmetics 2023, 10(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics10010015 - 12 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2154
Abstract
Background: Acceptability tests are designed to demonstrate that there is no chance that cosmetics would irritate or distress users in day-to-day situations. Objectives: to develop and validate a tool or scale that dermatologists, general practitioners, and other healthcare professionals can employ to assess [...] Read more.
Background: Acceptability tests are designed to demonstrate that there is no chance that cosmetics would irritate or distress users in day-to-day situations. Objectives: to develop and validate a tool or scale that dermatologists, general practitioners, and other healthcare professionals can employ to assess a cosmetic product’s tolerability, safety of usage, and pleasantness. Methods: A three-step modified Delphi technique was used in the consensus process. Two rounds of online surveys and a final face-to-face meeting were performed. Fifty experts for the Delphi panel were chosen to reflect a holistic array of expertise and perspectives in pharmacovigilance, dermatology, and cosmetic safety assessments. In round 1, 80 statements and 115 statements related to skin tolerance and cosmetic safety/efficacy, respectively, were distributed to all members of the expert panel. The expert panel was asked to rate the extent to which they agreed with each statement in the questionnaire using a 5-point Likert scale and given a chance to include a remark beside each item. A statement had to receive 80% of the panel’s approval to be accepted. Results: A total of 50 professional experts were recruited in the Delphi questionnaire rounds (response rate = 63%). The expert panel reached a consensus on 30 statements to evaluate skin tolerability and 34 statements to evaluate cosmetic safety and efficacy (agreement rate level ≥ 80%). The experts also proposed a generic, systematic approach that would allow patients to report both functional and physical symptoms in addition to those discovered during an examination (clinical signs). The confrontation of these symptoms determines whether the investigated cosmetic product is ultimately cutaneously acceptable. Conclusion: The tool that was proposed during this study offered good content validity. Future studies are recommended to test the developed tools in practice to evaluate the good skin compatibility and the safety and quality of cosmetics in the UAE and other nations. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 676 KiB  
Article
An Exploratory Study to Identify the Gender-Based Purchase Behavior of Consumers of Natural Cosmetics
Cosmetics 2022, 9(5), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics9050101 - 03 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4944
Abstract
Consumers have become more open to the use of natural cosmetics. The production of natural cosmetics has grown in recent years because of demand from consumers who are concerned about skin health, product quality, and beauty. The presence of harmful chemicals in cosmetics [...] Read more.
Consumers have become more open to the use of natural cosmetics. The production of natural cosmetics has grown in recent years because of demand from consumers who are concerned about skin health, product quality, and beauty. The presence of harmful chemicals in cosmetics has made consumers realize the importance of being “natural”. This paper focused on identifying the factors that influence Indian consumers’ purchase intentions and purchase behavior towards natural cosmetics. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) was used to study the purchase intentions and purchase behavior of male and female consumers of natural cosmetics. In India, there has, in recent years, been a growing demand among males for cosmetics and specifically natural cosmetics. We studied the differences between male and female consumers’ purchase intentions and purchase behaviors by using the structural equation modeling of SmartPLS 3.0. A study of 335 women and men in India revealed that Attitude towards Environment and Natural Cosmetics had a positive influence on Purchase Intention and, subsequently, Purchase Behavior. There was also a positive influence of Perceived Behavioral Control on Purchase Intention. Product Knowledge had an indirect impact on Purchase Intention through Attitude towards Environment and Natural Cosmetics, as well as an indirect impact on Purchase Behavior through Purchase Intention. Subjective Norms was the only factor that did not have a significant positive impact on Purchase Intention and Purchase Behavior. However, the influences of the variables on Purchase Intention and Purchase Behavior did not differ between male and female consumers, thereby offering evidence of the similarity between men and women in their natural cosmetics purchase behavior. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 4348 KiB  
Article
Usage Patterns and Self-Esteem of Female Consumers of Antiaging Cosmetic Products
Cosmetics 2022, 9(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics9030049 - 11 May 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 10597
Abstract
Aging is an irreversible process of the human body, resulting from a progressive decrease in the biological functions of the organs, including the skin. This study analyzed the relationship between usage patterns of different types of anti-aging cosmetic products, sociodemographic variables, appearance schemes, [...] Read more.
Aging is an irreversible process of the human body, resulting from a progressive decrease in the biological functions of the organs, including the skin. This study analyzed the relationship between usage patterns of different types of anti-aging cosmetic products, sociodemographic variables, appearance schemes, psychological morbidity, perfectionism, and aging perception of aging with self-esteem. This cross-sectional study included a sample of 260 women, aged between 25 and 64 years, who are users of anti-aging cosmetics and/or aesthetic treatments. Participants were assessed on psychological morbidity (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), appearance schemes (Appearance Schemas Inventory—Revised), perfectionism (Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale), aging perceptions (Brief Aging Perceptions Questionnaire), and self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale). The use of facial-firming cosmetics positively correlated with self-esteem. The results of regression analysis revealed that psychological morbidity and perfectionism contribute negatively to self-esteem, while marital status, professional status, and aging perceptions (positive consequences) contribute positively. According to the results, intervention programs to promote women’s self-esteem should focus on the reduction in psychological morbidity and the promotion of adaptive patterns of perfectionism and address aging perceptions. Longitudinal studies might help explain the complex relationship between the use of anti-aging cosmetic products and psychological variables, particularly self-esteem in women. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1512 KiB  
Article
Microalgae as a Sustainable, Natural-Oriented and Vegan Dermocosmetic Bioactive Ingredient: The Case of Neochloris oleoabundans
Cosmetics 2022, 9(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics9010009 - 09 Jan 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4065
Abstract
“Vegan” and “sustainable” characteristics are strong claim trends behind the development of innovative skincare, fragrances, and makeup products. This created a need in the market for compliant ingredients. To date, there have been no records evidencing the use of the microalgae Neochloris oleoabundans [...] Read more.
“Vegan” and “sustainable” characteristics are strong claim trends behind the development of innovative skincare, fragrances, and makeup products. This created a need in the market for compliant ingredients. To date, there have been no records evidencing the use of the microalgae Neochloris oleoabundans (NA) in dermocosmetics. Therefore, we studied the applicability of such a natural compound in this context. NA was cultivated, and the scavenging activity (SA) of the NA extracts was evaluated. The highest SA was from the aqueous extract (54.8% ± 2.1%), being higher than that of the positive control. Two hydrogels were prepared with 1.0% ammonium acryloyldimethyltaurate/VP copolymer: (1) control gel; and (2) gel with a 1.0% NA aqueous extract. In vivo experiments were performed in healthy male and female volunteers with skin phototypes of II–IV. The stratum corneum (SC) hydration and the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were measured in the forearm of participants to determine their biocompatibility. This parameter was determined by skin bioengineering measurements, confirming that SC hydration and TEWL were not affected by the samples. The laser Doppler measurements results showed a delayed erythema onset in the sites, where the NA hydrogel was applied. The results confirmed the biocompatibility and the anti-inflammatory activity of an innovative ingredient derived from microalgae suitable for a natural and vegan lifestyle. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

13 pages, 549 KiB  
Review
Consumer Behavior, Skin Phototype, Sunscreens, and Tools for Photoprotection: A Review
Cosmetics 2023, 10(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics10020039 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3421
Abstract
Sunscreens and photoprotection tools along with consumer habits and behaviors, can mitigate the skin damage caused by excessive solar radiation. For example, protecting oneself in the shade, avoiding inadequate sun exposure at times of higher incidence of UVB radiation (between 10:00 a.m. and [...] Read more.
Sunscreens and photoprotection tools along with consumer habits and behaviors, can mitigate the skin damage caused by excessive solar radiation. For example, protecting oneself in the shade, avoiding inadequate sun exposure at times of higher incidence of UVB radiation (between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.), wearing clothes with sun protection factors, applying sunscreens at the correct amounts and intervals, and wearing glasses with anti-UVA and UVB lenses are effective measures for protecting an individual. Therefore, the objective of this review was to highlight the importance of photoprotection for all skin phototypes, as skin cancer is a worldwide public health problem. In this review of the scientific literature on the Scopus platform between 2015 and 2022, we addressed the most common behaviors among different individuals and their phototypes, the importance of clarifying population habits against solar radiation, and the use of sunscreens and photoprotection tools to provide advice on healthy and safe sun exposure. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 336 KiB  
Review
An Overview of Methods to Characterize Skin Type: Focus on Visual Rating Scales and Self-Report Instruments
Cosmetics 2023, 10(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics10010014 - 11 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 6459
Abstract
Skin type classification is important because it provides guidance for professionals and consumers to recommend and select the most appropriate cosmetic products and skin care protocols and it is also important in clinical research. Several methods have been proposed for classifying skin typologies [...] Read more.
Skin type classification is important because it provides guidance for professionals and consumers to recommend and select the most appropriate cosmetic products and skin care protocols and it is also important in clinical research. Several methods have been proposed for classifying skin typologies such as non-invasive bioengineering tools (examples: Corneometer® and Sebumeter®), visual and tactile methods (subjective methods that evaluate skin appearance, texture, temperature, and abnormalities), artificial intelligence-based tools and instruments (examples: visual rating scales, and self-report instruments). Examples of known visual rating scales used to classify skin aging are the Griffiths Photonumeric Scale, the Glogau Scale, and the SCINEXA Scale. The Fitzpatrick Skin Phototype Classification and the Baumann Skin Type System are some of the self-report instruments used for skin type classification. Despite the diversity of methods to classify skin type and degree of skin aging, data on instruments are scarce and not adequately compiled. Validation in larger samples and with individuals of different ethnicities and geographic locations is needed to promote a more universal use. Visual rating scales and instruments are interesting tools that allow the skin to be promptly and efficiently examined, without using costly or complex equipment, and are very useful in a clinical or self-assessment context. Full article
14 pages, 2274 KiB  
Review
Psychological Aspects of Sensitive Skin: A Vicious Cycle
Cosmetics 2022, 9(4), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics9040078 - 29 Jul 2022
Viewed by 3022
Abstract
Sensitive Skin Syndrome (SSS) has been the subject of intense research in the past several years. Recent reviews confirm that about 40% of the population report moderate or very sensitive skin, and an additional 30% report slightly sensitive skin. Although certain phenotypes are [...] Read more.
Sensitive Skin Syndrome (SSS) has been the subject of intense research in the past several years. Recent reviews confirm that about 40% of the population report moderate or very sensitive skin, and an additional 30% report slightly sensitive skin. Although certain phenotypes are more susceptible, anyone can suffer from SSS and this condition can manifest in all anatomic sites. A wide variety of environmental and lifestyle factors can trigger SSS symptoms of itching, stinging, burning, pain, and tingling. In order to avoid such triggers, the SSS individuals often alter their behaviors and habits such as restricting their daily activities, and modifying the use of everyday products that non-sensitive individuals take for granted. In addition, there is an association between SSS and some common psychological problems. Sensitive skin symptoms such as itching, stinging, burning and pain can result in sleep disorders, fatigue, stress and anxiety. Conversely, lack of sleep and stress from external sources can make the SSS sufferer more prone to the symptoms. This becomes a vicious cycle that impacts consumers’ quality of life and well-being. We are beginning to understand the importance of the underlying causes that can impact skin conditions. However, in order to better understand the SSS individual, we need to also be aware of the psychological factors that can trigger and/or worsen this skin condition, as well as the psychological stresses the condition places on the individual. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop