Tribological Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Cold-Sprayed Coatings

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion, Wear and Erosion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 5869

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Hyperion Materials & Technologies, P.I.Roca, Carrer de la Verneda, 12, 24, 08107 Martorelles, Spain
Departament de Ciència i Enginyeria de Materials (CEM), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: surface engineering; thermal spray coatings; optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy; phase transformation; characterization techniques; high temperature wear; sliding wear; abrasive wear; fatigue wear; frettig wear; cavitation and erosion wear; electrochemical corrosion; hot corrosion; oxidation; residual stresses
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Materials Science and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Tampere University, 33100 Tampere, Finland
Interests: materials science; surface engineering; coating technology; thermal spraying; cold spraying; anti-icing coatings; characterization and testing; coating properties and performance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cold gas dynamic spraying, or simply cold spraying (CS), is a solid-state coating technology that has been gaining more and more popularity since it was patented at the end of last century, not only among people working in the thermal spray industry for coating and repairing purposes, but also as an additive manufacturing process that allows building up bulk metal parts layer by layer.

Despite first being investigated for ideally low melting point and ductile metallic materials, as they have a low yield strength and exhibit significant softening at elevated temperatures, this never avoided spreading the challenge to deposit higher strength materials, even ceramics and cermets.

Primarily based on the plastic deformation of depositing powder particles at high velocity onto the substrate, CS avoids any unwanted phase transformation or oxidation occurring in conventional thermal spraying processes, where the thermal energy input leads to full or partial melting of feedstock. Powder characteristics, geometric variables, and processing parameters can result in different microstructures and, consequently, changes on the mechanical, tribological and corrosion properties of the deposit. In order to improve the quality of the coatings, several studies have been performed using post-deposition treatments, i.e., laser irradiation, to enhance coating adhesion and to reduce interconnected porosity. Additionally, heat treatment has been explored with the aim to release plastic strain and make the microstructure more uniform. These topics are of current relevance and make the industries consider the technology an interesting alternative to other processes, leading to potential investment.

The scope of the present Special Issue focuses on recent studies exploring different aspects that may affect either deposits so that the surface properties of less wear- or corrosion-resistant substrates are improved, or to bulk additively manufactured components produced by means of CS. Wear studies may include sliding friction, abrasion, erosion, cavitation, and fatigue performance. Studies on corrosion may include wet corrosion and high-temperature corrosion/oxidation. The following concepts affecting such properties are revised:

  • Single or multiphase materials deposited by means of cold spray;
  • Influence of different deposition parameters as well as spraying gun systems. Deposition can be produced either by high-or low-pressure cold spraying;
  • Influence of different powder morphologies;
  • Analysis of residual stresses and how they can affect the resulting properties;
  • Effect of post-deposition treatments;
  • Computer modeling, simulation to predict coating properties, performance, durability, and reliability in service environments.
Dr. Núria Cinca
Dr. Heli Koivuluoto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cold spray coatings
  • corrosion resistance
  • wear resistance
  • mechanical properties

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 4884 KiB  
Article
Electrochemical Corrosion Characterization of Submicron WC-12Co Coatings Produced by CGS and HVAF Compared with Sintered Bulks
by Núria Cinca, Olivier Lavigne, Riberto Nunes Peres, Susan Conze, Soeren Hoehn, Sergi Dosta, Heli Koivuluoto, Chung Kim, Fernando Santos da Silva, Ville Matikainen, Reza Jafari, Elena Tarrés and Assis Vicente Benedetti
Coatings 2022, 12(5), 620; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12050620 - 02 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2001
Abstract
The electrochemical corrosion performance of WC-12 wt% Co in coating and bulk forms has been evaluated in a 3.56 wt% NaCl solution. The coatings were deposited by means of thermal spray techniques, i.e., cold gas spraying (CGS) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) spraying, [...] Read more.
The electrochemical corrosion performance of WC-12 wt% Co in coating and bulk forms has been evaluated in a 3.56 wt% NaCl solution. The coatings were deposited by means of thermal spray techniques, i.e., cold gas spraying (CGS) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) spraying, while bulks with different WC sizes were manufactured by conventional pressing and sintering. Microstructural characterizations and phase composition determinations were carried out using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Differences in WC grain size and morphology, carbide dissolution, and cobalt binder phase transformation are discussed according to the inherent characteristics of each processing method. Together with surface roughness (polished/as-sprayed), these features have been observed to directly affect the electrochemical corrosion performance. Electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential, polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and polarization curves) showed that the as-sprayed CGS coating presented an electrochemical behavior similar to those of the bulk materials. This was attributed to the higher metallic character of this coating in comparison to that of the HVAF coating. The polished HVAF coating showed anodic activity lower than those of the bulk samples, most likely due to the presence of cobalt–tungsten carbide phases and eventually the lower amount of Co available for dissolution. Finally, the as-sprayed HVAF coating showed very high resistivity due to the presence of surface oxides generated during the deposition process. Full article
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14 pages, 4980 KiB  
Article
Microstructure and Properties of Cold Sprayed NiCrAl Coating on AZ91D Magnesium Alloy
by Xiangwei Zhao, Tianshun Dong, Binguo Fu, Guolu Li, Qi Liu and Yanjiao Li
Coatings 2021, 11(2), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11020193 - 07 Feb 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2665
Abstract
Herein, a NiCrAl coating was prepared on the AZ91D magnesium alloy by cold spraying technology. The microstructure, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of the cold sprayed NiCrAl coating were studied and compared with two NiCrAl coatings prepared by plasma spraying. The results showed [...] Read more.
Herein, a NiCrAl coating was prepared on the AZ91D magnesium alloy by cold spraying technology. The microstructure, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of the cold sprayed NiCrAl coating were studied and compared with two NiCrAl coatings prepared by plasma spraying. The results showed that the porosity of the two-plasma sprayed NiCrAl coatings was 3.21% and 2.66%, respectively, while that of the cold sprayed NiCrAl coating was only 0.68%. The hardness of the cold sprayed NiCrAl coating (650 HV0.1) was higher than those of the two-plasma sprayed NiCrAl coatings (300 HV0.1, 400 HV0.1). In the abrasion resistance test, the cold sprayed NiCrAl coating showed a lower friction coefficient (0.346), less wear volume (3.026 mm3), and superior wear resistance accordingly compared with the two-plasma sprayed NiCrAl coatings. Moreover, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) morphology at the bottom of the wear trace of the cold sprayed NiCrAl coating showed a compact mechanically mixed layers (MML) structure, and its wear mechanism was mainly abrasive wear, with some fatigue wear. In the electrochemical test, the corrosion current density of the cold sprayed NiCrAl coating (4.404 × 10−2 A·cm−2) was much lower than those of two plasma sprayed coatings (25.96 A·cm−2, 26.98 A·cm−2), indicating that the cold sprayed NiCrAl coating had superior corrosion resistance. Therefore, preparing a cold sprayed NiCrAl coating is a feasible method to comprehensively improve the wear resistance and corrosion resistance of the AZ91D magnesium alloy. Full article
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