Graphite/Carbon: Surface Modification and Application

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Characterization, Deposition and Modification".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2023) | Viewed by 3968

Special Issue Editor

School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430070, China
Interests: polymer nanocomposites; graphene-based functional materials; biomass carbon materials; rubber reinforcement; flexible electronics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon materials are attracting tremendous research interest because of their extraordinary properties and unparalleled advantages in energy, environmental, materials, catalysis, biomedicine, electronics, etc. The most widely used carbon materials include graphite, graphene and their derivates, carbon nanotubes, fullerene, carbon quantum dots, carbon fibers, activated carbon, carbon black, biomass-derived carbon, and so on. The applications of these carbon materials strongly depend on not only their intrinsic structural features, but also their interfacial affinity with other substrates. In this regard, modification toward the structure and surface of carbon materials as well as interface with applied substrates is crucial for their valued applications. For this reason, we would like to assemble a Special Issue titled “Graphite/Carbon: Surface Modification and Applications” and provide a platform for researchers to publish their novel and constructive studies.  

We are pleased to invite you to contribute a research or review article to this Special Issue on “Graphite/Carbon: Surface Modification and Applications”.

This Special Issue aims to highlight state-of-the-art modification technologies toward the surface of carbon nanomaterials and interfaces between carbon materials and applied substrates. Novel applications based on carbon materials are also included. The topics of interest for this Special Issue, in particular, include (but are not restricted to):

  • Novel surface modification technologies for carbon materials;
  • Functionalized modification and applications of graphite, graphene, and their derivates;
  • Characterization and analysis of carbon materials;
  • Novel carbon materials: structure and properties;
  • Carbon-based coatings;
  • Carbon films;
  • Carbon–carbon composites;
  • Applications based on carbon materials, including batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen production, water treatment, wearable electronics, sensors, catalysts, biomedicine, etc.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Can Jiang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon materials
  • coatings
  • surface modification
  • interface
  • energy storage
  • batteries
  • catalysts
  • wear resistance
  • lubricant
  • sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 4600 KiB  
Article
Metal-Free Catalytic Preparation of Graphene Films on a Silicon Surface Using CO as a Carbon Source in Chemical Vapor Deposition
by Lintao Liu, Wei Li, Zhengxian Li, Fei He and Haibing Lv
Coatings 2023, 13(6), 1052; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13061052 - 6 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1067
Abstract
The metal-free synthesis of graphene films on Si substrates, the most common commercial semiconductors, is of paramount significance for graphene application on semiconductors and in the field of electronics. However, since current research mainly uses C-H gas as the carbon source in chemical [...] Read more.
The metal-free synthesis of graphene films on Si substrates, the most common commercial semiconductors, is of paramount significance for graphene application on semiconductors and in the field of electronics. However, since current research mainly uses C-H gas as the carbon source in chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and Si does not have a catalytic effect on the decomposition and adsorption of C-H gas, it is challenging to prepare high-quality graphene on the Si surface directly. In this work, we report the growth of graphene directly on Si without metal catalysis by CVD using CO was selected as the carbon source. By controlling the growth temperature (1000–1150 °C), a process of 2–5 layers of graphene growth on silicon was developed. The electrical performance results showed that the graphene film had a sheet resistance of 79 Ω/sq, a resistivity of 7.06 × 10−7 Ω·m, and a carrier migration rate of up to 1473.1 cm2 V−1·S−1. This work would be a significant step toward the growth of graphene on silicon substrates with CO as the carbon source. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphite/Carbon: Surface Modification and Application)
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13 pages, 4064 KiB  
Article
Wide-Range-Sensing Candle Soot/Elastomer Strain Sensors with High Sensitivity
by Yuan Wang and Zhong Xiong
Coatings 2023, 13(6), 1010; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13061010 - 29 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1204
Abstract
Nowadays, flexible resistive strain sensors attract growing attention owing to their various applications in the fields of electronic skin, human health detection, body motion, etc. Unfortunately, to date, the fabrication of a high-sensitivity soft sensor under a wide-range strain through a simple and [...] Read more.
Nowadays, flexible resistive strain sensors attract growing attention owing to their various applications in the fields of electronic skin, human health detection, body motion, etc. Unfortunately, to date, the fabrication of a high-sensitivity soft sensor under a wide-range strain through a simple and cost-competitive approach is still a challenge. In this work, a facile polymer-surface-swelling-adhesion approach was developed to fabricate bilayer candle soot/poly (styrene-b-ethylene-butylene-b-styrene) elastic strain sensors, which obtained a high sensitivity performance at a wide range of strain. When the surface density of candle soot was 0.42 mg/cm2, the gauge factor (GF) values of the sensor were 113, 77, and 177 for various strain ranges of 0%–9%, 9%–60%, and 60%–100%, respectively. The sensor could detect tiny strains such as 0.1% and demonstrated a sensing time of 265 ms at 10% strain. Moreover, after 1000 cyclic loading-unloading at 30% strain, the relative resistance variations remain stable. The sensing mechanism was explained by the tunnel effect for low and medium strain ranges and contact resistance change for the high strain range. As a further step, respiration with a surgical mask, body motion, and road roughness were successfully monitored by using the sensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphite/Carbon: Surface Modification and Application)
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11 pages, 3199 KiB  
Article
The Influence of the Ion Implantation on the Degradation Level of the Coated Particles of Nuclear Fuel Samples
by Zuzanna M. Krajewska, Tomasz Buchwald, Andrzej Droździel, Wacław Gudowski, Krzysztof Pyszniak, Tomasz Tokarski and Marcin Turek
Coatings 2023, 13(3), 556; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13030556 - 5 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1107
Abstract
TRIstructural ISOtropic (TRISO)-particle fuel is nuclear fuel used in high-temperature reactors. During reactor operation, partial damage may occur to the covering layers of this fuel. The authors of the publication propose an ion implantation method as a surrogate for neutron irradiation in the [...] Read more.
TRIstructural ISOtropic (TRISO)-particle fuel is nuclear fuel used in high-temperature reactors. During reactor operation, partial damage may occur to the covering layers of this fuel. The authors of the publication propose an ion implantation method as a surrogate for neutron irradiation in the reactor core. This method makes it possible to reflect the damage that can be caused by irradiating samples in the reactor much faster and without having to deal with radioactive material. This paper presents an experiment on the p-TRISO samples, with a focus on the level of damage to the covering layers that could occur after 1, 3 and 5 years of neutron irradiation. The paper presents research conducted on both polished and unpolished p-TRISO fuel samples implanted with ions (Ne+, He+) of appropriate fluence and energy. It is necessary to determine whether the passage of time affects the occurrence of structural changes in p-TRISO fuel layers and, at the same time, whether it contributes to an increase in the probability of damage in the examined fuel material. The result of this work is confirmation that ion implantation is an efficient tool for reflecting irradiation-induced damage in the p-TRISO samples. In addition, the assumption that the sample does not need to be polished to obtain information about damage in the p-TRISO covering layers was confirmed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphite/Carbon: Surface Modification and Application)
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