Advanced Bioactive Glasses and Ceramic Coatings

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Ceramic Coatings and Engineering Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1995

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Centre for Energy Research, 1121 Budapest, Hungary
Interests: bioceramics; composites; functional ceramics; biopolymers; corrosion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is a matter of great pleasure to invite you to contribute to present Special Issue on “Advanced Bioactive Glasses and Ceramic Coatings”.

Ceramics are very useful and versatile materials. They can be used in many ways and forms in industry or in the biomedical field. The ceramics utilized in biomedical areas are called bioceramics or bioglasses. Bioceramics as well as bioglasses can be used as replacements for hard tissues in human bodies in order to repair damaged bones, owing to their unique chemical and mechanical properties. Moreover, they can also be used in dentistry as injectable bone cements, coatings on implants in orthopaedics, scaffolds in tissue engineering, or as drug carriers. In addition, the glass-ceramic materials can combine the advantageous properties of each component, such as porosity, toughness, and mechanical strength. Bioactive glasses are regarded as a class of bioceramic materials. They also possess appropriate biocompatibility and bioactivity in biological environments. The other main advantage of bioglasses and bioceramics is that they can form a strong chemical bond at the interface when they applied as special coatings, promoting their integration into the bone tissues and stimulate cell proliferation and differentiation. To date, three main types of bioactive glasses are known: silicate-based glass (SiO2), phosphate-based glass (P2O5), and borate-based glass (B2O3). However, there is intensive research on developing new types of bioglasses and bioceramics by doping them with other bioactive elements or minerals, thus improving their bioactivity.

Dr. Monika Furko
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioceramic coatings
  • biodegradable ceramic composites
  • bioactive glasses
  • calcium phosphates
  • biocompatibility

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 5114 KiB  
Article
Innovation and Evaluations of 3D Printing Resins Modified with Zirconia Nanoparticles and Silver Nanoparticle-Immobilized Halloysite Nanotubes for Dental Restoration
by Karwan Rashid Darbandi and Bassam Karem Amin
Coatings 2024, 14(3), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14030310 - 02 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Additive manufacturing technologies can be used to fabricate 3D-printed dental restorations. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of the functionalized loading of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) nanoparticles and silver-nanoparticles-immobilized halloysite (HNC/Ag) nanotubes into 3D printing resins. We created 3D printing resins [...] Read more.
Additive manufacturing technologies can be used to fabricate 3D-printed dental restorations. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of the functionalized loading of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) nanoparticles and silver-nanoparticles-immobilized halloysite (HNC/Ag) nanotubes into 3D printing resins. We created 3D printing resins by adding different mass fractions of ZrO2 and HNC/Ag. First, six groups of samples containing ZrO2 were prepared, comprising five groups with different mass fractions and one control group of ZrO2 containing 1 to 16 %wt. Different mass fractions of HNC/Ag fillers were combined with the ZrO2 mixture and resin at the ideal ratio from 1 to 7.5 %wt. The mechanical characteristics of 3D resin that we assessed were the flexural strength, flexural modulus, fracture toughness, and the microhardness. Additional rates of ZrO2 4 %wt. and HNC/Ag 5 %wt. significantly increase the flexural strength, flexural modulus, and fracture toughness compared to the control group (p < 0.001). ZrO2 16 %wt. and HNC/Ag 5 %wt. were found to be significantly harder compared to the other groups (p < 0.001). The amounts of NPs that can be added to 3D printing resin modification appears to be 4 %wt., and HNC/Ag 5 %wt. can be advantageous in terms of fracture toughness, flexural strength, and flexural modulus. All additions of nanoparticles raised the resin’s hardness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Bioactive Glasses and Ceramic Coatings)
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10 pages, 1222 KiB  
Article
The Emission of Volatile Components during Laboratory Vitrification When Using Fly Ash and Other Waste to Obtain Ceramic Coatings
by María Belén Almendro-Candel, Pío Callejas, María Ángeles Montealegre, Jesús María Rincón and Manuel M. Jordán Vidal
Coatings 2023, 13(11), 1966; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13111966 - 18 Nov 2023
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Abstract
For decades, a significant amount of research has been conducted on the vitrification of mixtures of all kinds of industrial wastes, especially fly ash, both from thermal power plants and municipal waste incinerators. Although the possibility of creating glass from all types of [...] Read more.
For decades, a significant amount of research has been conducted on the vitrification of mixtures of all kinds of industrial wastes, especially fly ash, both from thermal power plants and municipal waste incinerators. Although the possibility of creating glass from all types of fly ash has been proven through such research, these studies barely focused on the emission of volatile components that takes place during vitrification processes at high temperatures. This is why, after identifying the types of volatilisation that can occur, we characterised the gasses that are emitted during the vitrification of some types of fly ash and other waste in a laboratory furnace. In order to do so, we analysed the Cl2 and SO2 gasses emitted using the DTA/TG/FTIR techniques, as well as the losses of H2O and CO2. The authors also measured the volatilizations directly from the mouth of the furnace using gas chromatography syringes and analysed the possible emission of dioxins. This study is the first analysis of volatile elements of this kind, after numerous vitrifications in recent decades which ignored the volatilisations that occur when using fly ashes. Although the various types of fly ash used generate emissions of Cl2 and SO2, their use as a by-product on an industrial level could be recommended if previous thermal and washing treatments are conducted. These would minimise the above emissions, enabling the use of said fly ash in the production of glasses for commercial frits, even if an efficient industrial-scale gas cleaning system would apply. Furthermore, an appropriate optimised design of its formulation would make it possible to structurally link some of these gaseous components to the glass structure. These types of results will make it possible to calculate the volatilization when vitrifying certain types of industrial waste on an industrial level, although these studies would require prior assessment in a pilot plant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Bioactive Glasses and Ceramic Coatings)
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